• How to (re)paint a loco?

    OK, so once I've finished my tunnel project and done some grass, bushes & trees, I want to try repainting my GP40 to my freelanced line's color scheme... I've got a hundred questions...

    Looks like the process goes something like this, as far as I've been able to glean:

    1) Decide on a color scheme
    2) Disassemble the shell, removing the windows if possible
    3) If windows nonremovable, mask over them.
    4) Strip off the old paint job (yes/no? how?)
    5) Paint the base color coat (should this be the light or the dark color?)
    6) Mask off the stripes and lines for the "accent" color
    7) Paint the accent color
    8) Touch up.
    9) Paint details (railings, horn, etc.)
    10) Add decals
    11) Hit with dullcote
    12) Weather
    13) Reassemble

    Great. A baker's dozen steps. So, the questions:
    1) What kind of tape do you use to mask
    2) Should I strip off the old paint? If so, how?
    3) For the base color, should I use the lighter or darker color?
    4a-4d) Any recommendations for laser-print custom decals? I've found DecalPaper.com... any better places? Should I have someone print them for me? If so, who? I do have access to a color laser printer.
    5) What did I forget??
    This article was originally published in forum thread: How to (re)paint a loco? started by TwinDad View original post
    Comments 4 Comments
    1. TwinDad's Avatar
      TwinDad -
      Update.


      I spent a bit of time during my vacation adding details and cleaning/sanding a few spots.

      I've added a pair of ditch lights to the short hood end, sunshades to the cab windows, and I have the 3-chime horn ready to install as soon as I decide exactly where to put it. Filled in some holes and sanded. I've also got the railings cleaned and ready to install.

      Photos aren't very good. It was very bright and hard to tell if I had the focus right. I'll get better shots later.

    1. Geep's Avatar
      Geep -
      One making material I have used for years on scale models, especially clear canopies of aircraft, is Bare Metal Foil, the chrome variety. It is a very thin metal, with some elasticity to it, so you can cut a strip off the backing sheet, burnish it down with a rubber eraser (it conforms to details) and use it like masking tape. What's even better is if you have a light touch, you can trim it on the model in place, getting perfect lines. You have to use a new Xacto blade and go easy.

      Its best to have a tag end on the foil that you can lift when you want to remove it, sometimes it sticks pretty good. A wooden chisel-tip skewer will get the stubborn pieces. I have masked this way for years. If I need a long straight line on relatively flat surfaces, Tamiya tape is the way to go, but going over curves or int corners or compound curves, over detial like rivets and such, the foil is my favorite.
    1. TwinDad's Avatar
      TwinDad -
      Quote Originally Posted by Geep View Post
      One making material I have used for years on scale models, especially clear canopies of aircraft, is Bare Metal Foil, the chrome variety.
      Bare Metal Foil? I'm not familiar with this. Where does one get it? Do you mean aluminum foil like you use in the kitchen, or some kind of specialty material?
    1. Geep's Avatar
      Geep -
      Quote Originally Posted by TwinDad View Post
      Bare Metal Foil? I'm not familiar with this. Where does one get it? Do you mean aluminum foil like you use in the kitchen, or some kind of specialty material?
      You get it at hobby shops. Car modelers use it for chrome bumpers and aircraft modelers like myself, in older times, would cover bare metal aircraft with it. They have it in dull aluminum, chrome, and several other finishes. Bare Metal Foil is the company name. The chrome seems to be the most useful for masking purposes.