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Tred

Ramble on...

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I guess this is the place to post a "ramble", so here goes.

Last saturday I am finishing off my yardwork, putting the riding mower back into the garage. It's a beautiful day in the neighborhood, and in Kansas City in general. Beautiful skies, probably one of the last wonderful weekends before winter closes it's icy grip on us, and the temps begin to drop. After I closed the garage door, and begin to walk up the driveway, I notice this small pain in a lymph node up in my upper right groin area? Each step as I work my way up the driveway, is becoming more intense.

I think to myself, "Awe, not today. I already have other plans."

The wife & I were getting together with another couple, to discuss our upcoming cruise plans, and go out to dinner. Within the hour, the pain intensified enough, I knew we had to go to the hospital. Matter of fact, I gave my wife the keys to my truck. Twenty minutes later, we arrive at the hospital, and even though it's 82* out there, I am freezing! Walking to the emergency room door, I keep drifting to my right. A person greets us and asks us "What is the problem today?"

I begin to explain that, I have had this before, it's called CELLULITIS. I explained that a little over 5 years ago, when the wife and I were dating, I almost died from this. When my (then girlfriend) wife got me to the emergency room, they told her I was about 12 hours away from death. I was in septic shock, and running a temperature of 105 something. Letting him know I was no stranger to this, I let him know this was round III. The next thing I know, my loving wife interrupts, and I am whisked away in a wheel chair?

Once in the evaluation room, they are scurrying around like rodents? As usual, I am cracking jokes, and being my usual charming self. Then again, whoosh! I am off to my room. Several doctors walk through, look at my leg, walk out. I wake up Sunday afternoon after (what I consider) taking a short nap. And I am having trouble remembering the day before? I look over at my wife, and ask WTF happened?

It seems that while I was being admitted, my conversation began to "wander away" from the question asked. Then the guy took my temperature. 107.2 degrees!!! That's the reason I was whisked off so quickly. They spent over 24 hours trying to get my temperature back down. AND, try & fight the cellulitis in my leg. As soon as the began pushing massive quantities of super antibiotics through me, they took me up to a room. Then they kept a close eye on me, to make sure the fever went back down.

Of course with the super antibiotics attacking the infection in my leg, my leg begins to S W E L L. Like twice as big as my left leg. Not to mention the pain involved with stretching your skin like a drumhead! So, they have been heading off the pain with morphine. Needless to say, I have been a bit loopy for a couple of days. The wife wouldn't bring my laptop till I could hold a conversation for more than 45 seconds. LOL She said when I could talk to her for a few minutes, I could have the laptop. (Good women are good to find!​) God only knows where I would have gone on the internet, or what I would have said to whom???

Now, out of all that, what bothers me the most is how fast I went from perfectly normal, to critical care. 4 hours, maybe? Back in 2009, I was almost killed by this, CELLULITIS. We (the doctor & I) have no idea how I contracted it. We do know, once you have it, you never lose it. It is like a "staph infection", but it's not really? I was attacked with this again, last year in mid-October. That hospital stay I quit smoking. BTW-Its almost been an whole year. It took a week for me to get out of the hospital.

I really need to work with the infectious disease doctor and knock this stuff out. Until this bout, I had not been offered an "after care" doctor to work with me on getting rid of it. I should go home in a couple of days, if not tomorrow. So, I will quit rambling on, and end this here.

Thanks for listening.
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