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Thread: N Scale Airport: What to fly?

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    Default Here is a good .......

    ...site for model aircraft of all vintages.http://www.herpa.de/Click on the 'English' link for english, unless you read Dutch.Most of their stuff is 1:500 scale, but there is plenty of 1:200 and 1:160 scale models if you take the time to search for them.I have several of these and they are absolutely superb in authenticity, details, and craftsmanship.
    (The voices I hear in my head may not be real, but sometimes they come up with a good idea.)

    Have fun.

    Moose

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    Default WildManDJ wrote: I'm

    Quote Originally Posted by WildManDJ
    I'm wanting to do an N scale airport, where would I find right scale planes, choppers and such?Thanks Wild Man[Mod note: Moved to a more appropriate forum. It is hardly a question for administrators!!![img]/modules/tinymce/tinymce/jscripts/tiny_mce/plugins/emotions/images/smiley-laughing.gif[/img] - BDC]
     i have a airport on my layout and i found the airplanes at walmart. they have all sorts of planes made by matchbox. choppers, private jets, rescue planes, and passenger jets. hope this helps. Life is Fragile. Live Everyday as if YOU Know Its Your Last.
    Life is Fragile. Live Everyday as if YOU Know Its Your Last.

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    Default Thank for the help guys,

    Thank for the help guys, I'm really new at this.Wild Man

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    Default WildManDJ wrote: I'm

    Quote Originally Posted by WildManDJ
    I'm wanting to do an N scale airport, where would I find right scale planes, choppers and such?Thanks Wild Man[Mod note: Moved to a more appropriate forum. It is hardly a question for administrators!!![img]/modules/tinymce/tinymce/jscripts/tiny_mce/plugins/emotions/images/smiley-laughing.gif[/img] - BDC]
    *Wildman;If you want some airport ideas, check out Steven Prince's Unitrack layout w/ airport in the Kato Photo Gallery http://www.katousa.com/gallery/...He has a huge collection of Worldwide 1/160 scale trains and 1/144 scale planes from WWII to present. http://www.katousa.com/gallery/Steven-Prince*HTH*Keith

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    Default wow thanks for asking this

    wow thanks for asking this i am curious too (im a student pilot) ive always wanted an airfield on my umpcoming layoutmy question is how long should a small landing strip be?sorry for hijacking this thread [img]/modules/tinymce/tinymce/jscripts/tiny_mce/plugins/emotions/images/smiley-wink.gif[/img]
    :P42::P40:
    Known as UPSD70M on the YT
    I also own just about every scale besides S and Narrow Gauge.
    91B MO National Guard

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    Default I have found all my

    I have found all my airplanes at either hobby shopes or wal mart. may also cheak ebay. Hobby town usa seens to have a good supply of small airplans although not perfectly the right scale.
    -Bruce
    Dayton N-trak
    PKB Paint Shops

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    Default Airports?

    Hey Allmodernkatogottohaveit,We would love to see some pictures. How does the stuff from Matchbox scale out?
    Best,
    Tony

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    Default Nscaler711,*How small an

    Nscaler711,
    *
    How small an airstrip do you want?* Here is an ancient small one that used to exist near the area where I live:
    *
    http://www.airfields-freeman.com/MD/Airfields_MD_Frederick.html
    *
    The small runway was 2350' long or 14.7' in N scale.* I suspect you will want to apply judicial compression to any runway you build.* Or have it continue off to the sunset in the backdrop....
    *
    Charles

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    Default N Scale Airport: What to fly?

    WildManDJMy few centsepending on your interests there is always the alternative of an aerial topdressing (cropdusting) airstrip.You wouldn't require any infrastructure or buildings - only a windsock on a pole to indicate the wind direction, an area for the aircraft to turn around on after landing so that it can reposition itself for take off with the next load, and a length of reasonably straight and flat grass* for the strip itself.You could need to construct a simple low walled*rectangle*for fertiliser-storage.*The aircraft-types could be quite varied, and range from a Piper Cub or some similar small type - perhaps a Stearman, *to a modified C-47 (Seriously!).* The owner of the operation could possibly have a microlite of some sort hangered off to one side - all very prototypical.Hope this helps.Komata"TVR - serving the Northern Taranaki . . . "
    Komata "TVR - serving the Northern Taranaki . . . "

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    Default Personally, I call 1:144

    Personally, I call 1:144 close enough.* If that is ok with you, check out stuff from Minicraft, 21st century toys, Revell, and others. *My personal favorites so far are from Minicraft, a C-97 and C-54. They are excellent kits and I may be incorperating them into a module in the near future.Here is the 97'http://img99.imageshack.us/img99/8016/10120815401nx7.jpg*
    http://img36.imageshack.us/img36/5152/signatureszp.jpg

    Modeling Pennsylvania's River and Bayard Branches, 1954-1979

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    Default pics

    Quote Originally Posted by Gargoyle
    Hey Allmodernkatogottohaveit,We would love to see some pictures. How does the stuff from Matchbox scale out?
    how do i post pics i tried to the other day but couldnt figure out how to so i just gave up. if you can help i will post them. dont know how they scale out but they look good in my book and they are pretty close to the 1:160 scale if you ask me.reggieLife is Fragile. Live Everyday as if YOU Know Its Your Last.
    Life is Fragile. Live Everyday as if YOU Know Its Your Last.

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    Default Site Help > Creating new

    Site Help > Creating new content > Adding images to content
    Bryan
    “Simplicity is the ultimate sophistication.” ~ Leonardo da Vinci (1452–1519)

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    Default *Sorry I just saw this

    *Sorry I just saw this post now. There was an entire Airport N scale on ebay a while back. Anyways there's lots of hangers made, and older Terminals around. I had been kicking around the idea of having an airport in my city but it's getting to the point where my city layout is going to be so large now I'm not sure If I'll have room. There's lots of planes jets etc made in the 1:150 1:144 and 1:160 scale.I'm frustrated because I've been looking for a good quality N scale Helicopter or a few of them and they are all garbage looking to me.I'm still looking for that.
    My flickr account... "collection of N scale city structures"
    http://www.flickr.com/photos/5506372...7612768739708/


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    Default

    Not enough real N scale aircraft available.

    I wrote to GHQ about this and they did not seem to keen
    on making any.

    I'd like to see some pewter or resin Cessnas or Pipers like you would find at a small country airport.

    Since I'm a pilot I'd like to be able to have a little aviation on my model railroad.

    Model Power makes a V-22 Osprey tilt rotor in 1/160 so I'll prob get a couple of those and plant them somewhere with an army truck or two nearby.

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    A Piper Cub (good stand-in for a small, short runway airplane) has a minimum takeoff distance of about 750 feet at MSL. Longer at higher altitudes. That scales out to about 4.6 feet (56 inches). That's about as short as you could go if you want to realistically model a full-length runway. Most commercial airport runways are at least 10 times that length.

    Given most viewer's sense of scale and knowledge of airplanes you could probably model it as considerably shorter, and nobody would be the wiser.

    Yer basic airstrip could be as simple as a flat strip of grass fairly long and about 50 scale feet wide (or less), with a windsock and a Quonset hut for a hanger. That'd do for most crop dusters, biplanes, Cubs, and even WWII fighters. For more modern stuff you're going to want concrete, with numbers and all that.

    I, too, am thinking about squeezing the end of a runway and a small plane somewhere on my layout, but I haven't found where, yet. Most likely it'll just be the end, with the "runway" extending into the backdrop.

    Oh, if you want to be "realistic" (and if you don't already know this), the numbers on the end of the runway are the compass bearing when facing down the runway, to the nearest 10 degrees. (so runway 27 points due West, and runway 36 points due North). Since most runways are double ended, the number on the other end will be the opposite bearing. This helps pilots check that (a) they're on the right runway, and (b) their compass isn't broken.

    Oh, and for the truly space-challenged, a helipad atop a tall building would be a nice addition. Doesn't need to be much bigger than the rotor blades, just a flat square pad with a windsock and a way to get down.

    Google Earth/Maps is your friend here. Airport runways (even small airstrips) are even easier to spot on a satellite picture than railroad tracks. Plus they're large enough you can see all the detail you need, right from the aerial photo.

    One more thing... prototypically, that 750 feet would be really pushing it for all but the most STOL of aircraft, even at sea level. More likely you'd see well over 1,000 feet, to allow for all the variables of weather, ground condition, engine power, payload weight, altitude, and so on.

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    Default

    FWIW this is an older post but usefull info none the less.
    Here is a bit of info on Meigs Field in Chicago. It was in use tell 2003.

    The runway at Meigs Field was nearly 3,900 feet (1,200 m) long and 150 feet (46 m) wide. In addition, there were four public helicopter pads at the south end of the runway, near McCormick Place

    This info was used from http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Meigs_Field There is some usefull info on that airport there.

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    Quote Originally Posted by Roque View Post
    FWIW this is an older post but usefull info none the less.
    ...
    Yes, you are correct, a year old in fact!

    As has been said many times, there is absolutely nothing wrong with resurrecting an older thread, especially if you have useful information to add. Just note the fact so that everything is kept in context!

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    Try this page to search N Scale stuff only:

    http://www.herpa.de/collect/(S(steog...s=0&lang=en-GB
    http://www.willoughbyandrockridge.com

    "I wash born here, an I wash raished here, and dad gum it, I am gonna die here, an no sidewindin' bushwackin', hornswagglin' cracker croaker is gonna rouin me bishen cutter." -Gabby Johnson

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    Herpa, the Micro-Trains of airplanes:

    http://www.herpa.de/collect/(S(steog...press=&thumb=1

    http://www.willoughbyandrockridge.com

    "I wash born here, an I wash raished here, and dad gum it, I am gonna die here, an no sidewindin' bushwackin', hornswagglin' cracker croaker is gonna rouin me bishen cutter." -Gabby Johnson

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    Quote Originally Posted by TwinDad View Post
    A Piper Cub (good stand-in for a small, short runway airplane) has a minimum takeoff distance of about 750 feet at MSL. Longer at higher altitudes. That scales out to about 4.6 feet (56 inches). That's about as short as you could go if you want to realistically model a full-length runway. Most commercial airport runways are at least 10 times that length.

    Given most viewer's sense of scale and knowledge of airplanes you could probably model it as considerably shorter, and nobody would be the wiser.

    Yer basic airstrip could be as simple as a flat strip of grass fairly long and about 50 scale feet wide (or less), with a windsock and a Quonset hut for a hanger. That'd do for most crop dusters, biplanes, Cubs, and even WWII fighters. For more modern stuff you're going to want concrete, with numbers and all that.

    I, too, am thinking about squeezing the end of a runway and a small plane somewhere on my layout, but I haven't found where, yet. Most likely it'll just be the end, with the "runway" extending into the backdrop.

    Oh, if you want to be "realistic" (and if you don't already know this), the numbers on the end of the runway are the compass bearing when facing down the runway, to the nearest 10 degrees. (so runway 27 points due West, and runway 36 points due North). Since most runways are double ended, the number on the other end will be the opposite bearing. This helps pilots check that (a) they're on the right runway, and (b) their compass isn't broken.

    Oh, and for the truly space-challenged, a helipad atop a tall building would be a nice addition. Doesn't need to be much bigger than the rotor blades, just a flat square pad with a windsock and a way to get down.

    Google Earth/Maps is your friend here. Airport runways (even small airstrips) are even easier to spot on a satellite picture than railroad tracks. Plus they're large enough you can see all the detail you need, right from the aerial photo.

    One more thing... prototypically, that 750 feet would be really pushing it for all but the most STOL of aircraft, even at sea level. More likely you'd see well over 1,000 feet, to allow for all the variables of weather, ground condition, engine power, payload weight, altitude, and so on.
    Good post. Here is something that will supplement it. This is part of the AIM, or Aeronautical Information manual dealing with airport lighting, signs, and visual aids.

    http://www.faa.gov/air_traffic/publi...m/chap2toc.htm

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