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Thread: FAQ Submissions

  1. #1
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    Default FAQ Submissions

    This area is for Frequently Asked Questions that we find commonly asking.

    Each Thread will contain a general answer to the question posed in the Thread Title, but will also have additional links to threads and sites that have more detailed information and discussions on the subject.

    To better tailor this section to our members needs, we're asking for your input.
    Whilst the FAQ Threads are locked (members cannot post to them), this thread can be replied to with your suggestions for new FAQ subjects, and suggested existing threads and sites that you find helpful in answering given common questions.
    Please indicate the FAQ that your submission pertains to when making a suggestion.
    Once your suggestion has been evaluated/implemented, your post will be removed to avoid thread bloating and to make it easier for us to keep track of what needs to be added.

    This area will not be a substitute for, nor will it contain modeling Tutorials.
    Tutorials should be in the appropriate Forum for the subject matter, however they certainly can be referenced from an FAQ.
    Bryan
    “Simplicity is the ultimate sophistication.” ~ Leonardo da Vinci (1452–1519)

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  3. #2
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    Here are a couple possibilities if I understand the purpose:

    1) N Scale Couplers & Conversions
    This will have links (and what not) to all the coupler technology and systems available or used in N scale (like MT Z scale which is used in N scale as well, and used for Nn3 which is also N scale, etc.) There is an interesting variety of couplers, including an odd kind from Kato used with subway cars or what-not. There would also be links to threads with conversions. A discussion or link to discussions about prototype couplers would be nice, and dimensional data.

    2) N Scale Wheel-sets and Trucks
    Same concept as in 1) only for available wheel-sets and trucks, and links to threads with conversions and use, and prototype data (for example there is at least one thread on site discussing when the prototype uses 33", 36" etc. wheels).

    3) Pictures would be nice too, for example the 'Pizza Cutter' discussion could use some pictures.

    Thanks, the FAQ discussion seems like a really good idea to me!
    Charles

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    Maybe a couple more:

    4) Locomotive and Railcar Maintenance
    Like:
    http://www.nscale.net/forums/showthread.php?t=16727
    And items on cleaning wheels and truck repair and maintenance (alignment tracking smooth rolling ability etc.) Electrical contact maintenance (locos, railcars).

    5) Track Cleaning and Maintenance
    All track maintenance and cleaning stuff, except maybe for turnouts, which might deserve a separate FAQ.

    6) Turnout Maintenance and Mods
    Lots of turnout related issues etc.

    Thanks again (if I got the right idea...),
    Charles

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    While I am at it, maybe:

    7) Soldering Know How and Why
    All the links to soldering threads can go here, and what not?

    Thanks again,
    Charles

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    Suggestions for FAQ topics are really appreciated but as I am sure everyone realizes they have to be written by someone and this really can be time consuming!

    I know, I did the Working with Images area in the site FAQs!

    So, if anyone is willing to step in and write some of these FAQs, their assistance would truly be appreciated!

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    You have the idea right Charles... we now have some items for folks to work on.
    Bryan
    “Simplicity is the ultimate sophistication.” ~ Leonardo da Vinci (1452–1519)

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    What do the numbers on diesels mean?
    All the best,

    OddTodd

    Shut up voices or I'll poke you with a q-tip again!

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    Quote Originally Posted by oddtodd View Post
    What do the numbers on diesels mean?
    Which numbers? The road numbers, the model numbers, all of them?
    Never mistake a guy who talks a lot for a guy who has something to say...

    CH&FR Site and Blog: http://www.chfrrailroad.net and http://blog.chfrrailroad.net
    Appalachian Railroad Technology: http://www.apprailtech.com


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    like GP9 GP 40 SD 40 SD 50 etc. I thought if I understand what the numbers are I could figure out which was which better. I mean I understand that gp means general purpose, and sd is special duty, but the numbers don't make sense. Like I have a GP40. I know that because that's what the paper said. But what keeps it from being a gp50?
    All the best,

    OddTodd

    Shut up voices or I'll poke you with a q-tip again!

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    I’ll take a stab at this. I found this confusing at first too, so here's what I've learned. First, each locomotive manufacturer has their own system, so what the numbers indicate on a GE locomotive doesn’t transfer to an EMD locomotive, for example. This will only cover EMD and GE, I just don’t know enough about the Alcos and others to go into those.

    Let’s start with EMD. GP means four axles, and originally meant General Purpose. SD has six axles and was Special Duty, although today SD is the standard and the last new GP model was introduced in 1985. With GPs and SDs generally the lower the number, the earlier the locomotive. So a GP7 came out before a GP9, and an SD40 before an SD50. The numbers themselves don’t have any special meaning; it’s just what EMD assigned. Lots of different factors including what the marketing department thought would sell more locomotives influenced the number assigned. There are two exceptions that I’m aware of. The more common one is anything ending in a -2, as in SD40-2, GP38-2, etc. There are some external differences between, say, a GP38 and a GP38-2 but they are pretty small (and somebody can cover them elsewhere if need be). The main differences are internal. Anything with a “dash 2” behind it represents an updated generation of the original design. The second exception is the GP15-1. It came out in the late ‘70s, which is way out of the order you would expect for its number. I’ve been told the 15 refers to the 1500 hp engine; if so it’s the only EMD locomotive I’m aware of where the number actually indicates the horsepower. EMD also built the “E” and “F” units from the early diesel era, E having six axles and the F having four. (In this case though, the center axle of each truck on an E unit is unpowered.) These are “car body” type locomotives with a distinctive appearance. Again, smaller numbers are generally earlier types, so F3 came out before F7. These have long since disappeared from the rails except for a few specially preserved examples, but remain popular with modelers. Although EMD has built relatively small quantities of the larger SD80 and SD90 locomotives, the current state of the art seem to be variants of the SD70 like the SD70ACe and SD70M-2. For modern EMD locomotives the AC means alternating current traction motors, and “M” means a wide cab (the standard cab of today) although confusingly there are some earlier locomotives where the M means something else.

    For GE, the two digit numbers generally indicate how much horsepower the locomotive has. The number behind the dash indicates a “generation,” so to speak. Older locomotives started with a U for universal, then a two digit number indicating hundreds of horsepower, then a letter indicating the truck configuration. So a U30C was a Universal series with 3,000hp and C-C trucks, or two trucks of three axles each for a total of six axles. A “B” would mean B-B trucks, or two trucks of two axles each, four total axles. Next they started the “Dash 7” series. With these the first letter indicates the axle arrangement, followed by the horsepower. So a C30-7 is a six axle locomotive with 3,000 hp from the dash 7 series, and a B23-7 is a four axle, 2,300 hp locomotive. That pattern continues through Dash 8 and Dash 9 locomotives. The dash 9s came out in the ‘90s and are still common today, you will hear them called both “Dash 9” and C44-9W. The W in this case means “wide” cab, which today is the standard cab and sometimes folks don’t bother with the “W”. The current state of the art for GE are the ES44AC and ES44DC, with ES for Evolution Series. These are usually called “GEVOs,” and are six axle locomotives although they no longer use a C to indicate that. AC and DC refer to AC or DC powered traction motors, and the number still indicates horsepower (44 means 4,400 hp).

    Ok, please pick this apart for any inaccuracies and one of you dinosaur fans chime in with the Alco info I’m not an expert by any means so mods/admins if you find a better answer it won’t hurt my feelings any to remove this one.

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  15. #11
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    Quote Originally Posted by OTFan View Post
    Ok, please pick this apart for any inaccuracies and one of you dinosaur fans chime in with the Alco info I’m not an expert by any means so mods/admins if you find a better answer it won’t hurt my feelings any to remove this one.
    For a little while, we'll leave this open for any additional info and/or corrections... then I'll combine it for a final edit and move it to its own FAQ entry.

    Thank you for contributing... it is greatly appreciated.
    Bryan
    “Simplicity is the ultimate sophistication.” ~ Leonardo da Vinci (1452–1519)

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    I have another question. What is the difference between all the couplers? What is a rapido, what is a knuckle, and what is compatible with each other? I am really confused about this too.
    All the best,

    OddTodd

    Shut up voices or I'll poke you with a q-tip again!

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    Quote Originally Posted by oddtodd View Post
    I have another question. What is the difference between all the couplers? What is a rapido, what is a knuckle, and what is compatible with each other? I am really confused about this too.
    http://www.nscale.net/forums/showthr...-A-Little-Info

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    FAQ suggestion would be "What layout planning software is available free and commercial?"
    MY GOD THAT'S MOOSE TURD PIE!!!.............. It's good though.

    -Utah Phillips from his performance of "Moose Turd Pie"

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    This is a great read with insightful info for us newbs

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