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Thread: Detailing diesell loco's

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    Default Detailing diesell loco's

    I have dipped my toe in the water of detailing diesel loco's. I had a few engines I purchased used with sunshades installed and they looked really good. It sort of made my other engines look like they were missing something. I bought some BLMA shades from the hobby store and gave it a shot.

    You need to drill #80 (tiny) holes for two prongs that hold the shades in place. I was not sure I could do this even with magnification, but it was not all that hard. The shades came with a drilling template, but I found it much easier to just hold the shade against the top of the window and sight where the holes needed to be and drill away.

    100_0427.jpg

    I used some Harbor Mist Gray paint on it and they turned out pretty good!

    So now I want to try some other things like grabs, fans etc and I am a little concerned about the scraping of the molded detail and the UP yellow paint. I hear yellow is a hard color to make look good...and this is not going to be a total repaint situation, just touch up the scraping and paint the actual wires and the paint needs to be thin to keep the details looking good.

    Anyone have any tips for this sort of detail? I really don't think prepainting the grabs will work.. or will it? PrePainting the MU hoses would probably work OK.

    Maybe I am just being nervous about nothing.

    Please share your experiences with details. What details have you installed and which ones really seem to make engines pop?
    Sean McC

    "No man is a failure ...

    who has friends." -- Clarence

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    Not to worry Sean. If you can do sunshades, you can do grabs. The #80 drill is probably the smallest you have, OK. Use .010 brass wire which scales out to 1.5" real life ( not counting the thickness of the paint ) for the handrails. I take and put a sewing pin in my pinvise to use as a centerpunch. If you are doing a lot of grabs, make a jig. Use a flat piece of styrene about .030 thick and make a small notch in the edge about .010 deep. Measure in the width of the grab and drill a .010 hole. Poke the wire in the hole and bend it over to the notch and then down the edge and all the grabs will be the sme length. Leave the ends long and trim them off after you glue them in. ACC them from the inside like the sunshade. Find a thin styrene strip to slide under the grabs so they all end up being the same distance from the shell and look uniform. Hand paint 'em with a fine tip brush and you will have something to be proud of. If in the end you aren't that happy with the paint match, put some weathering chalk, or powder, on them and it will all blend together. Show us how they came out. Not many of us take the time to do this.

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    Don't forget the windshield wipers!
    Karl

    CEO of the Skally Line, an Eastern MN Shortline

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    So, what is the best way to remove the cast on parts? Do I touch-up paint before I install the details? I am worried most about the yellow since most of my engines are borg type.
    Sean McC

    "No man is a failure ...

    who has friends." -- Clarence

  7. #5
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    Hi seanm,
    I have not attempted this yet with any bright colour and mine are pretty much Dark Green Loco Enamel (Brunswick Green) so I do not have the paint matching colours you have.

    The way I have removed detail in the past is with the smalled bevel edged wood chisel I can find. You would need to remove the body from the shell and then mask off the area you are working on . That is to protect it from slips and to keep you work in one area.

    Slowly work along the base of the detail from both sides with the chisel and you will find that it will just lift off as one piece. The chisel should be kept as flat as possible as you do not want it digging in. When you have accomplished this using the pin vise centre punch method suggested mark the centre of the handrail hole or if you are using BLMA handrails I believe they come with a jig.http://www.blmamodels.com/cgi-bin/we...es=02002-00013 I have just checked and added this link as I believe it is one of the best list of diesel detail parts currently available.

    Drill the hole with your smallest drill. Remember lubricate the drill first with either bees wax or parafin wax so they do not break in the plastic. Do not reverse the drill to remove it as that also tends to make the loose plastic expand in the hold and break the drill. When this is all finished lightly sand with 800 or plus wet and dry with wet water (water with a drop of detergent per pint) (1 pint = 1 drop) until the plastic and paint are at the same level. Dry with a tissue and allow to air dry.

    Then spray the work area with Floquil Armour Yellow. Spray lightly from the edges working to the centre to cover. Once all this is dry remove the masking tape and look at the result. If you have a lip on the edge lightly sand it until it blends in.

    If you have any colour difference (it should at the max only be very minimal) you can mask this with a very light weathering after you have applied the handrails.

    Insert the handrails into the drilled holes and cement into position with ACC from the rear. Normally I make a slight dimple where the handrail comes through so that when I cut it off flush there is some metal left for the ACC cement to adhere to. It does not have to be much of a indent and if your are doing it with a Dremel burr be very careful. Remember the inside will need to be flush to clear the split chassis.

    Now if the handrails are not already painted you can paint them with a grey etch primer and after that has cured touch up with Armour Yellow. Now give the whole loco a very light coat of satin or gloss clear depending on the finish you want. With the weathering I would err on the side of satin.

    Hope this helps. If you have any other questions please come straight back.

    Regards
    Last edited by Huntington; 20th Mar 2011 at 05:29 AM. Reason: BLMA Link

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    Great info there!! I just tried my hand at lift rings this afternoon. MAN they are small, but I was able to get them in and they look pretty good! I have some parts coming in to do the more advanced detail. Thanks again!
    Sean McC

    "No man is a failure ...

    who has friends." -- Clarence

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    I'm paying close attention and takin good notes on this thread...
    Never mistake a guy who talks a lot for a guy who has something to say...

    CH&FR Site and Blog: http://www.chfrrailroad.net and http://blog.chfrrailroad.net
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  11. #8
    Huntington Guest

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    Hi Folks,

    Just remember the best advice I can give with the chisel is to lay it flat with the surface where you are trying to remove the detail that way it cannot dig in.
    You can make different grades of files by using a piece of 7MM X 7mm styrene strip from evergreen and shape the end. Then glue wet and dry to two sides. That give you a file that will not file away at the sides and it does not rust. It is robust enough to take water especially if you use goo or rubber based cement to stick the wet and dry on. You can lay this flat on the surface and get a true sand and with water it will be fine and controlled. If you want I will make a file and take photos so you can see what I am talking about.

    Regards

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    Here are the lifts. Unpainted so far. I used an xacto chisel to remove the molded lift rings. Went prety well. I did not sand for those. When i get to the grabs, I will be sanding.

    100_0431.jpg
    Sean McC

    "No man is a failure ...

    who has friends." -- Clarence

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    Neat work! I like them. This is a project I've wanted to try for a while, but have lacked the dedicated time to finish it. I plan on following this closely and learning from the project. Please - post pictures!
    Mark

    Citation X Captain
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  15. #11
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    Seam,

    Well done, they look good.

    Hi Herc Driver, good to see you with your feet back on the ground. I got approval to show my plans.

    Regards

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    Sean I think it is amazing how much difference just the shades make on the appearance. I want to superdetail just one locomotive in the future. Glad you stuck your toe in the water first! Looks very good!

    Be the kind of person your dog thinks you are.



    Ron

    For now, innocent bystander and occasional commentator

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    Oh yeah! Nice job Sean!
    Never mistake a guy who talks a lot for a guy who has something to say...

    CH&FR Site and Blog: http://www.chfrrailroad.net and http://blog.chfrrailroad.net
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    VERY nice Sean!
    My favorite computer game is "Stump The Spellchecker"...
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    It is not as hard as I expected. I have learned that you need lots of extra #80 bits. Also it is a really good idea to choke up on the bit in the pin vise so just enough to make through the material it exposed. Lots less breaks that way. Also don apply any pressure till it starts to bite well and only a little ore after that.
    Sean McC

    "No man is a failure ...

    who has friends." -- Clarence

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    Huntington Guest

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    Hi Sean,

    I have just highlighted the bit in my thread to save your drills.

    Regards

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    Ya, I tried that Al. I think it is my technique, or lack there of. It is not a breaking but I tend to bend them after about 10 holes. I am getting better at it and appreciate the advice.
    Sean McC

    "No man is a failure ...

    who has friends." -- Clarence

  22. #18
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    Hi Sean,

    Don't get so exited.

    Regards

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    Don't push too hard with the #80 bits, let the bit go at it's own pace. I don't lubricate the bits but I do choke up on them. One #80 can get me through at least 3 locomotives (approximately 120 holes) if I treat it well.

    Remember that some details don't need to be painted. Wipers and mirrors can be left in bare metal on most applications.

    I like to apply a little gap filling CA to a piece of glossy paper (like magazine pages) the glue won't soak into it very fast, then holding the exposed part of the detail with a good set of tweezers I dip the part in the CA and stick it in the hole. It keeps the project nice and clean.

    With BLMA grab irons I use a piece of .020" styrene as a spacer. I I put all of the grabs in, put my spacer under them and apply the CA from the inside of the shell. Then I use a pair of Xuron flush cutting pliers and I nip off the wire that hangs off inside. This helps the shell go on and off the frame a lot easier.
    Attached Images Attached Images
    Karl

    CEO of the Skally Line, an Eastern MN Shortline

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    Since this is really my first attempt, it is not looking bad. Best at 1foot, but still ok for a first try. Still have not tried wipers, MU hoses, cut levers or fans.

    100_0437.jpg
    Sean McC

    "No man is a failure ...

    who has friends." -- Clarence

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