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Thread: Wrightsville Port: N-Scale Waterfront Layout

  1. #201
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    Quote Originally Posted by Tred View Post
    I just have to say, it is impressive work! Your skills are up there. Glad to hear your still in the not done yet frame of mind. I'll be looking forward to the new additions. Good luck in the future additions!
    Thanks Tred! I personally don't like the 'not done yet' frame of mind in most of the cases - I like set targets and time frames, I get it done, I move on. Trust me, that's how this one started - I thought I would complete it in 2 years and move on to something new. But things changed and the layout sort of grew on me, and now it has become a part of my life. Not sure if it will happen for all my future projects though.

    Quote Originally Posted by genshed62 View Post
    Very impressed with the new case and the fact the layout has been moving around being intimately familiar with the movers in India. I hope you have a good source for the PVC foam. I always had trouble finding it in Delhi.

    Thank you again for sharing your fantastic layout with us!
    Thanks Andy! I booked one of the 'best' and most expensive movers in India and paid a hefty amount for a 10 kilometer move. They did break my wife's 20 year old computer table, my USS Enterprise model and a few other stuff, but thankfully, nothing serious happened to the layout. I think the all wood construction and the solid backdrop frame gives it good protection. Moreover, all the tiny and fragile stuff are removed from the layout before moving and packed in my personal baggage or car, so that saves those models.

    It took me quite a while to get a shop in Hyderabad for the PVC foam - there is actually a hub where you get multiple shops that sell them. I'm sure Delhi has some shops since the material is in high demand - try searching in India Mart, or sending a message to our email group - someone might know.

    Quote Originally Posted by Mobile One View Post
    I've always felt this was a very impressive layout. I'm glad it has been able to make the journey with you and still be worked on during your travels.
    Thank you Daniel! This job finally promises that there will be 'no travel' - hoping to use that to the best of my advantage and get some more work done before end of this year. It's been nearly a year that I have done some serious modelling!
    Kaustav and Mouli

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  3. #202
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    First project in the new apartment, again something that is long pending.

    Though I made the lighthouse nearly 5 years back (Gosh! time flies!), I never got around to motorize it. While re-assembling the layout in the new apartment, I decided to start with this one since I already have all the materials needed to motorize the already built structure - it's just about attaching the lens housing (which was also made nearly 4 years back) to a slow motion motor.

    The first step was to measure the space and clearance for the motor:



    Then I'd cut a Masonite circular disk matching the inner diameter of the base of the lighthouse



    The central hole was made to fit the motor bolt thread of the motor housing


    The motor was then fixed to the board,


    And then test fitted at the bottom of the lighthouse to check for clearance etc.


    If you see the original construction details of the lighthouse (and many pictures thereafter), you would notice that the beacon housing already had a light installed. I just tested it's position and made sure everything is in it's place


    Next step was to attach a shaft to the motor. Now this is where I again switched to 'scrap-building' mode. I didn't have a hollow shaft of suitable diameter with me - neither styrene, nor metal. So I went scrap hunting that can be made into a suitable hollow shaft, and I found a non-working pen. This was a gift from Brooklyn Locomotive Works, so I thought what could be a better place to utilize this than on an N scale Layout!

    All the internal mechanism of the pen was removed - the tip side of the pen meshed nicely with the motor shaft, so I just secured it by drilling a through hole on the pen and securing it to the motor shaft using a pin (which was actually a part of a paper clip):


    If you follow my work closely you would notice that one of my major focuses is always easier maintenance, because in my experience, things can go wrong at any time. So I decided not to permanently attach the lens housing to the shaft. So I created a removable section that tightly fits to the upper portion of the pen, but can be removed if required.


    Now, if you are wondering how I found that lens - it is actually a contact lens packet! Some of the contact lens packaging have a perfect lens for model making - perfectly shaped, made of tough plastic and has very short focal length which is perfect for a lighthouse animation.

    Here is the final shaft assembly with the lens:


    And here is how the assembly looks when you 'cover' the shaft with the lighthouse structure. The light bulb hangs from the ceiling of the beacon housing and sit along the axis of the rotating, hollow lens housing.

    Kaustav and Mouli

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  5. #203
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    And here is the lighthouse totally assembled:


    Final test before installing on the layout


    And that's how it looks when installed:


    Here is a very short video to show it in action - Technically this is a 'fixed and flash' lighthouse with no eclipse:



    All the photos and videos are with my phone, hoping to get a better composed video soon - may be after I finish some more work on the layout.
    Kaustav and Mouli

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    Well, it definitely seems like the old days again! Fortunately I have more time for making models, and also upgraded my arsenal with some very important tools that were long overdue - a Dremel rotary tool and an airbrush are the top two recent acquisitions.


    So when I started working on the oil pier, the focus was more on using the tolls as well as building the model! Hence there is not going to be a step by step construction post for this one because we simply didn't have the patience to take photos after every step - we were two excited to build it and then take it straight to the paint booth... I mean the cardboard carton that acted as the paint booth!


    First, here is the in progress photo of the facilities of the oil pier. Given how small this pier is - there is basically nothing much in terms of operations. Small ships/barges unload oil that is stored in the 4 relatively small oil storage tanks. Then the the tanker cars are loaded and the oil is shipped to the local businesses. The oil storage tanks and the ships were built long ago, so I started with the tanker car loading platform and the small pump-house-cum-control room.




    The material of choice however has changed considerably - except the base which is cardboard, everything else is either styrene or plastic. As per my trademark 'scrap-building', I have used some leftover parts from the ME trestle kit, as well as the sprue of the same kit used to make the piping.


    My initial thought was to simply model a couple of hose pipes connected to the ship to simulate unloading, much like below.




    However, when I started finding some prototype photos, I found that this is not really how the oil unloading happens - not even in the smallest of the ports. What they use is something like this, called the loading arms.




    So I found a few drawings online, and decided on this one - simple enough for my tiny oil pier, but keeps is real and prototypical.





    The material I used for the piping is also something very new to me - aluminium tubes. Though I have used them before, I have just cut them in straight sections. Given I did not have the L pipe joints in N scale, I had to use my new Dremel rotary tool to cut, bend and shape the pipes - sorry, no progress photos from here onward since we were building and discovering quite a few things at the same time, we didn't really think of taking progress shots.

    So here is the final result - all weathered to match the tone of the rest of the layout - the only thing pending now is completing the mooring on the ship, and then this section of the layout is done.







    Kaustav and Mouli

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  7. #205
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    Fantastic. The loading arm is so real I would have thought it had to be from a kit! Great stuff!
    Andy C.,
    Southern Pine Rail Operations, Back in Cypress TEXAS

    My build thread: http://www.nscale.net/forums/showthr...706#post476706

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  9. #206
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    Scenes like this tend to look so visually "busy", it's often daunting to think about modeling them. But I love how you have it broken down into constituent parts - you had the tanks themselves from before, then added the rack and the loading arm. It gives me a bit more confidence to start on the large coal mine and silica mine industry scenes that are in the area where I'm currently working on my layout; I want to achieve a similar kind of visual complexity (different pieces of course, with conveyors rather than pipes, etc.).

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  11. #207
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    Quote Originally Posted by genshed62 View Post
    Fantastic. The loading arm is so real I would have thought it had to be from a kit! Great stuff!
    Thank you Andy!

    Quote Originally Posted by WP&P View Post
    Scenes like this tend to look so visually "busy", it's often daunting to think about modeling them. But I love how you have it broken down into constituent parts - you had the tanks themselves from before, then added the rack and the loading arm. It gives me a bit more confidence to start on the large coal mine and silica mine industry scenes that are in the area where I'm currently working on my layout; I want to achieve a similar kind of visual complexity (different pieces of course, with conveyors rather than pipes, etc.).
    Thanks Michael! I think breaking down anything in small items always helps. I did the same for the grain facility and the town scene. Only problem is, it takes awfully long to finish something, and on top of that if you are as lazy as I am, it never helps!
    Kaustav and Mouli

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    Fantastic job! That's about as real looking as it gets!!!

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    Well, the next endeavor was to complete a project that seemed deceptively small and simple in the beginning - completing the port office and a small junk yard.


    For the office building, I went back to my roots of using paper - the brick texture is a scalescenes texture printed directly on a 50 GSM water color paper. Then that sheet was pasted on a 100 GSM water color paper to make a solid brick texture board suitable for N scale.

    Windows and doors are Grandt Line products, the corrugated shed is made of styrene corrugated sheets.







    Now to the next step - it is very unusual to see a port with railroad not to have a junk yard. However, given how small this layout is, there is not enough space to make a proper junk yard, so I decided to use the real estate available at the base of the grain conveyor tower to make a old junk yard.


    Given this is a 1960s layout, I also took the opportunity to bring the 'ghosts of steam' in my theme - in the early days of N scale I purchased a Bachmann set that had a tiny 0-6-0 - lovely little engine that never worked properly. Some point since then I was irritated enough to disassemble the whole engine trying to fix it - never succeeded. The engine remained disassembled and in reality in the status of scrap ever since in a little box - the only thing that was intact is the tender. When I decided to build the junk yard, I just took out those parts, weathered them heavily to create the main contents of the junk yard. In addition, I threw in some more heavily weathered stuff whatever I could find - an odd wheel, some broken corrugated sheets and some literal junk. Added some small amount of tall grass too so that it looks more realistic.








    Finally, I also managed to paint and add some rooftop gears in some of the buildings - these are all from a Corner Stone series - first spray painted, and then I used dry brushing to highlight the vents



    Kaustav and Mouli

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  16. #210
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    Happy New Year!

    After a little pause from Model Railroading (which is never surprising nowadays), I acme back to complete the oil facility. All major components were completed a few months back, the only thing pending were the pontoon rafts to separate the ship from the port quay wall, and then completing the mooring to tie the ship to the dock.

    So here are the little pontoon rafts - nothing special really. dimensions are 30 X 25 X 8 in millimeters, plus the tires. Made of styrene, and bitts are my customary toothpicks. I think I am getting the hang of the air brush thingy!



    Once these are built, the only thing remaining was to tie them up with a chain and sandwich them between the ship and the port wall. My wife donated me with one of her cheap chains, so I painted it and used them to tie these up to the bitts. Once done, I completed the mooring of the ship with 4 lines which I think is sufficient for a ship of this size.

    So here are the final photographs:





    Here is a helicopter view of the facility that clearly shows the placement of the pontoon rafts and the whole facility.




    Now, here I would like to take the opportunity to thank my dear friend John Milford for his invaluable guidance on everything related to ships, ports and all the nitty-gritty of how to model a realistic port scene. It started with this very model - Sirius, the Oil Tanker, and then it continued throughout the other aspects of this project for lat 8 years- thank you John!
    Kaustav and Mouli

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    Wow. Just freaking Wow. Some of those shots could very closely pass for the real thing, the only real giveaway being the water, and that only really because I *KNOW* it's a model.

    Excellent work, Kaustav. Excellent.
    Never mistake a guy who talks a lot for a guy who has something to say...

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  19. #212
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    yeah what @TwinDad said!
    Yours,

    Gene

    Turtle Creek Industrial RR

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  21. #213
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    Agree - excellent work and representation of a crowded waterfront. I have spent a career in shipyards and appreciate the constant battle for space close at hand to lay down materials. You have captured that feel in your port where space is carefully used. And with the rust on the tanker, I can almost here the sailors using needleguns to prep the surfaces for a splash of touch- up paint!
    - Rob
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    Going in direction of FreemoN (and Freemo for leftover HO gear)

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  23. #214
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    Looks great. Loved the article in N Scale Magazine with regards to your lighting techniques.

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  25. #215
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    Thank you everyone! Means a lot. We are really glad that people are enjoying this little layout. More coming soon.

    Quote Originally Posted by TwinDad View Post
    Wow. Just freaking Wow. Some of those shots could very closely pass for the real thing, the only real giveaway being the water, and that only really because I *KNOW* it's a model.

    Excellent work, Kaustav. Excellent.
    The water is not done yet - I just applied a couple of coats of gloss, the last one I think was nearly 3 years ago. I still have quite a few details to add to the port, and once done, the water will be the final detail.

    Quote Originally Posted by dave68124 View Post
    Looks great. Loved the article in N Scale Magazine with regards to your lighting techniques.
    Thank you! I hope it is useful. If you still have questions, please feel free to ask.

    Quote Originally Posted by RH Bay View Post
    Agree - excellent work and representation of a crowded waterfront. I have spent a career in shipyards and appreciate the constant battle for space close at hand to lay down materials. You have captured that feel in your port where space is carefully used. And with the rust on the tanker, I can almost here the sailors using needleguns to prep the surfaces for a splash of touch- up paint!
    Haha - Thank you! And that actually is a great scene now that I think of it. I am yet to add more details - one gantry crane, an open shade with crates and boxes and fully packed interior of that warehouse. Believe me, if I had known that detailing a port is such a painstaking job, I might have chosen another subject.

    On a second thought - may be not!
    Kaustav and Mouli

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    20 months since my last post in this thread, and many of you might be thinking that this as good as an archive - well, Wrightsville Port is back to prove you wrong!

    So this is what happened in between - I moved to my new apartment back in March - 6th home for the layout in it's 7+ years of existence. Here is the new set-up:

    IMG_20180417_093309 by Trains And Dioramas, on Flickr

    The new house and other projects did keep me away from the layout in most part, however, I did manage to add small details over time. and finally, I believe I am back at the workbench to see this project through and try to bring this layout to completion by end of this year and then this thread can truly become an archive! Here are some shots with some new details and weathering that I added in last few months. There are a few new builds that I will start very soon, but before that I want to complete proper and believable weathering on all existing elements on the layout.

    Abandoned factory. More to come on this:

    IMG_20180919_002517 by Trains And Dioramas, on Flickr

    IMG_20180919_002622 by Trains And Dioramas, on Flickr

    IMG_20180919_002801 by Trains And Dioramas, on Flickr

    Waterline details - more color and texture added:

    IMG_20180919_003238 by Trains And Dioramas, on Flickr

    More weathering on the main warehouse:

    IMG_20180919_003348 by Trains And Dioramas, on Flickr

    More rust and weathering on the fence and other metal parts:

    IMG_20180919_014926 by Trains And Dioramas, on Flickr

    IMG_20180919_003419 by Trains And Dioramas, on Flickr

    And finally, just a unique angle and frame that I have never tried before!

    IMG_20180919_014742 by Trains And Dioramas, on Flickr


    Stay tuned, more to come.
    Kaustav and Mouli

    Website | YouTube | Facebook | Instagram


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    Glad to see Wrightsville Port is still going strong Kaustav. Your modeling is always inspirational, excellent work!

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  29. #218
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    There is a lot of great model railroading in that amount of space. Glad to see you are keeping up on it.
    Really like that conveyor set up.
    Thanks for sharing.
    Steve - Jugtown Modeler..............Don't know enough about railroading yet, but scale modeling is my life..............Web-Folio

    The introduction of so powerful an agent as steam to a carriage on wheels will make a great change in the situation of man. -- Thomas Jefferson, 1802


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  31. #219
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    Excellent layout... you have some great modeling and detailing skills!! Overall wonderful layout!! You don't see many waterfront layouts with this level of detail!!

    Cheers!

    Matt

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  33. #220
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    I like how you have developed your own unique style, and how one can metaphorically "see the brush strokes" in your work. I don't mean that literally, though there might be some cases where it literally applies, but rather, your work has an overall texture to it that makes it recognizable. I see your stuff on Facebook every now and then, randomly popping into my feed, and I always recognize it as a Wrightsville Port photo on first glance. It's like how the true masters of painting sometimes use quick brush strokes with unblended colors in order to impart the sense of more detail than is actually there; they let the way the paint behaves, rolling off the palette knife or blending in place, work for them. When you look close at such a painting, the evidence of the brush strokes gives clues to how it all came together, yet the reality is that this "texture" in the painting adds up to a lot more.

    Your layout has a similar quality, not just in terms of how things are painted and weathered, but also in aspects like the track planning, as it offers so many distinct facets that it can appear to be much larger than it really is. The specific placements of buildings and scenery is also a factor, defining areas of focus and channeling one's gaze - I think one could argue that some of these industries are not ideally situated for a real-world facility, and so there is a "break" from prototype fidelity there... but that's the style breaking in, with a painter's eye for composition guiding things. I think there are actually lots of things in this layout that could be isolated and considered out of context, and thereby be proclaimed to be less than top-notch modeling (I know you have an appreciation for just how "top" the top notch can be, so I really don't mean to slight your work in any way), but the truth is that the context matters, and the full picture presented in this layout is truly masterful.

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