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Thread: Boxcab?

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    Default Boxcab?

    IF, and now that I found this little beauty, WHEN i build a box cab this is the one I want. Not sure it's legal to post the image here, but I'll give ya'll the link.

    Now, how to build this?
    ~ Charles

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    Not sure I'd classify that as a boxcab!! Not boxy enough!

    I'd start with maybe powered chassis maybe from plaza-japan. Something like this? http://www.ebay.com/itm/Powered-Moto...item1c25894579
    It's going to be hard though since it's almost a flat car with a little cab in the middle. What an usual design! I can't actually find something that would fit. If you were doing a full box-cab it's easy to fit the motor inside, but that thing is going to be potentially very very tricky to pull off. It might not really be possible

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    Maybe this is a new niche... the "CrateCab"
    Bryan
    “Simplicity is the ultimate sophistication.” ~ Leonardo da Vinci (1452–1519)

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    Charles: That is just plain weird looking!
    I would bet that there are not many of those on model railroads.
    Ken Price
    http://s567.photobucket.com/albums/s...ice/?start=all

    It's around 1996-1999. UP, MP, SP. South Valley Railroad. Some where in the west of Texas. Maybe near the border.
    Started in 2007, Super Empire Builder with radio throttles.

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    I'm thinking of building a dummy for this one as fitting the motor in that would be above my current skill level. Plus more affordable
    ~ Charles

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    It's a steeplecab. Or at least that's what I've always heard them called. Those flat platforms on the end do make it a challenge to find a mechanism that would fit. Some of the TomyTech ones are the right shape but way too long....
    "Do Not Hump!?!?! Does that mean what I think it means?!?"--Michelle Blanchard

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    Not all steeple cabs had flat ends.
    Here's one you could put a motor in.
    http://www.rrpicturearchives.net/sho...spx?id=1884540
    Jim

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    Yeah it's going to be almost impossible to do a design that has flat bits above the trucks as there's always going to be a lump there where the motor gears down to the trucks.

    Maybe have a box or some cargo sitting on top to hide it? I don't know!

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    Don't believe the naysayers, someone's already done a steeplecab with a Kato critter chassis. This can be done, and done easily if you don't try to make it "rivet-perfect". I'd start with a Kato 11-106 chassis. From there, slight modifications will be necessary to the motor cover (the off-white plastic cover), like cutting off the ends. This will give you more space to use for the end platforms. I'll continue thinking over the next steps, but I don't doubt it can be done.
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    Yes, that is a Steeplecab.
    The angled equipment boxes in front and back of the cab forms "the church roof". They are much easier to build in the other scales, as you can buy powered trucks that do not have gear towers.

    Here's a tutorial to convert a Kato four wheel version to a eight wheeler. http://www.teamsavage.com/ncat/Kato_shorty_B.html The Kato steeple cab is part of Kato's Pocket Line. The loco comes with two cars in the set.

    Many of the small locos were built by GE. The one that Jimmi listed was most likely built by Baldwin-Westinghouse. This was considered a mainline locomotive. Unlike the AGEIR style loco built by Musicman the steeplecabs never had diesel power they were strictly electrically powered Most got their power from overhead wire either with a pole or pantograph. Some used a third rail for power and ran on Rapid Transit systems. Batteries were used for short runs in areas without a power source.

    Baldwin type locos are available periodically from TomyTec/Tomix as part of their Tetsudo Collection. It uses the TM-03 chassis (40 ft). Four wheel steeplecabs have been made by Arnold/Rapido in Europe and Heki in Japan.
    That's the Heki
    Last edited by ChicagoNW; 12th Jun 2012 at 09:18 PM.
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    Quote Originally Posted by ChicagoNW View Post
    Batteries were used for short runs in areas without a power source.
    Battery powered locomotive? how many miles did they get out of those? I'll be modeling a short line and I'm not sure I'm brave enough try modeling the over-head wiring.
    ~ Charles

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    Electric locomotives are not gifted with tons of cast/welded iron engine block and fuel. They often substitute concrete. Another form of ballast can be lead acid batteries. Tons of them. The GE steeple cabs came in 25, 30, 44 and 60 tons. You could make up the difference between the components and the final weight in non-functional weight or power providing batteries. Either one adds tractive effort.

    These batteries would placed in cabinets under the cab and in the dog houses. If needed the dog houses could be enlarged for more storage space.

    Running times would vary with load. Heavy loads would mean short durations. The locos depending on the number of batteries could as little as a mile or run for hours.

    Don't be afraid of overhead wire. If you can solder feeders you can hang wire. The first pole is always the hardest of the project. It's the one you need extra hands for. After that, your previous work helps a lot. But you can avoid soldering by using premade catenary wire (the wire that hangs from a wire) and poles from Europe or Japan. It's drawback, price. Brass ready to use poles and trolley wire is available from http://myworld.ebay.com/brianweisman...84.m1543.l2533 He has made poles that resemble the one used by many different systems.
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    OK, if you decide to do this, here's some information on using the Kato 11-106 (or 105 or 107) powered chassis. You'll need to start by removing some material from the clip that holds the motor in place. This is the off-white or gray clip on top of the unit. Remove the end clips (the side clips are adequate on their own). Then you'll have to cut and file down the top of the front and rear side of the clip. Here's a diagram for reference:



    The red line shows how the "flatcar" deck will need to be built and applied. You can use some styrene strips to go around the outside, along with some styrene sheeting (or wood) for the top of the deck. Here's a crude mockup of how the end product might look:



    Note that this is completely roughly done just for the sake of a visual mockup. You'll want to do some measuring and find out exactly how big the cab and ends should be, relative to the chassis and 1:160 people that might fit through that door. Note also that it won't be easy to make this a good runner, since it will be hard to get some weight in there, but it can be done.
    Last edited by PW&NJ; 10th Jun 2012 at 12:04 PM.
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    Thank you, very nice instruction. This will make a great winter project I'm sure. As for being a great runner.... I'll be happy if it just runs around the track for appearances.... maybe bulling a couple tourist excursion cars.
    ~ Charles

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    Your loco will run better if you use brass instead of plastic and wood. If you want texture, Archer www.archertransfers.com has decals for both wood and diamond plate. They also sell louvers (electrics have lots of them). The Kato chassis run much better with at least .75 ounces of weight.

    I used a 1/32" thick single piece of brass for the deck. the center is cut/ground/filed to fit around the motor and gear towers. The cut down motor cover is used to hold the plate to the chassis. L channel was soldered to the ends to form the buffer plates. C channel can be added to make the frame. I need to add more pieces to form ladders and foot boards. Mounts for the couplers also need to be made. The pole needs to be wired to the chassis and the shell stuck on, to finish mine.

    You could just glue the brass together instead of soldering. It just adds a little more weight.

    The trucks are condensed versions of modern Japanese heavy duty freight or passenger types. They need to be changed. Disguising or hiding them is easiest. Don't take too much material from the truck, the power pickups hold the axles on. The plastic frame holds the pickups.

    Be very careful, spare parts are only available through those of us who have destroyed some chassis on our own. KatoUSA does sell these chassis.
    Last edited by ChicagoNW; 11th Jun 2012 at 12:40 AM.
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    Excellent suggestion CNW, I was just about to suggest the same. ANY source of more weight is a good thing on these little guys. For example, the loco you're basing this on has some stuff in between the trucks on the underframe. MAKE IT OUT OF METAL! Also, regarding the sideframes, one idea that works nicely is to use a file to flatten out the existing details, then build up some truck sideframes out of thin styrene, CA it on and paint/detail. Personally, I left mine alone, other than paint/weathering. Another idea for details, you could build the body out of brass and use printed details (do up the details from the actual switcher, print on a color laser or inkjet using label stock, cut and apply to the brass). Then add extra details to the outside of that, blend in the cut-lines, and it ought to look pretty neat. Anyway, lots of ideas to work with here.
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    The steeple cabs are great projects to make from sheet brass. Most, if not all, of the loco body can be flat sheets with square or angled joints. You can cut and fold the brass sheet to make major chunks of the body.

    Great sources for drawings and info are the "Traction Twin" books from Carstens Publishing.

    TRACTION Handbook For Model Railroaders
    By Paul & Steve Mallery
    The handbook has information on everything dealing with layout and equipment. There are many equipment drawings and photos as well as modeling and prototype information. Although intended for the bigger scales the information can be used for N.

    Traction Planbook
    Edited By Harold Carstens

    The planbook has equipment drawings and photos to assist with scratch building or kit bashing trolleys, streetcars, interurban freight motors and rapid transit equipment. Although intended for the bigger scales the information can be used for N.

    They are available as a set from the Carstens Bookstore on the web.

    Although out of print I like the following publication better. It is less technical but very practical.

    TRACTION GUIDEBOOK For Model Railroaders
    Edited By Mike Schafer
    The guidebook has information on everything dealing with layout and equipment. It has several histories of prototype roads. There are many equipment drawings and photos as well as modeling and prototype information. They take you through building an interurban car and have several layout plans. Although intended for the bigger scales the information can be used for N.

    When all else fails join http://groups.yahoo.com/group/nscaletraction/ They are dedicated to building and promoting traction modeling in N scale. Although the niche is small the group has members worldwide.
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    Lot's of info here, thanks guys... it will take a while for me to process all this.
    Sounds like it could get expensive and complicated (yes, I know, the KISS principle, lol) but seriously though when I started this thread I was just toying with the idea to get a feel for what it might be like, and I do like building things, the sense of accomplishment at the end makes it all worth it.
    So now I'm quite serious about building one, I just don't know when.
    ~ Charles

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    Here's a page that has some loco designs that you can practice with.
    http://www.hokenstrom.com/trains.html
    There are many kinds of locomotives on the page but the paper is a great place to practice and find details that you like.

    Don't worry if they are European prototypes the principle and even some of the designs are universal.
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    Quote Originally Posted by ChicagoNW View Post
    Here's a page that has some loco designs that you can practice with.
    http://www.hokenstrom.com/trains.html
    There are many kinds of locomotives on the page but the paper is a great place to practice and find details that you like.

    Don't worry if they are European prototypes the principle and even some of the designs are universal.
    Nice designs thank you, I might have to try this one too: SJ Scania Vabis trolley 1912 1:87, not sure how that fits in with the rest of them.
    ~ Charles

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