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Thread: Track in pavement.

  1. #21
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    Darryl,
    Those cracks and pot holes look very convincing!
    Nice work!

    When you say the diluted Matte Medium is used to stabilize the cracks, you mean so it won't continue to crack and chip more than you planned?

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    Allen,

    Basicly, you need to use the matt medium to get some adhesive down to the foam to make it more rugged for handling and longevity.

    I usually die the plaster with paint and a bit of white glue in the water to mix the plaster to the right color and consistancy for easy spreading. Spread it on the foam in a smooth thin coat, as thin as you can (I use a razor blade. Then after dry sand the road surface and paint to final color. Then, chip and crack away. When you get the effect you like, I then wick in Alcohol/India Ink just in the cracks. Let dry again. This brings out the crack a bit more. Then i wick in a dilute of 50/50 matt medium water in the crack and holes to further harden the plaster underneath and get everything to stick a bit better. A final coat of the road in the same matt medium mix makes the road plaster pretty rugged for handling. I find if you don't do this step, the plaster can seperate from the foam. You could probably add more white glue to the plaster mix at the beginning, but I did not want the plaster too tough to not allow for proper chipping/cracking.
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  4. #23
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    Quote Originally Posted by Rail and Tie View Post
    Allen,

    Basicly, you need to use the matt medium to get some adhesive down to the foam to make it more rugged for handling and longevity.

    Then i wick in a dilute of 50/50 matt medium water in the crack and holes to further harden the plaster underneath and get everything to stick a bit better. A final coat of the road in the same matt medium mix makes the road plaster pretty rugged for handling. I find if you don't do this step, the plaster can seperate from the foam. You could probably add more white glue to the plaster mix at the beginning, but I did not want the plaster too tough to not allow for proper chipping/cracking.
    Ah!! That makes sense. It gives the foam some tooth for the plaster to lock onto!
    Then the coat in the cracks and over the surface for a little more strength.
    Understood! Thanks
    .

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    if you wanted to add some CrAZy detail to this, you could add a metal color that matches your track on the concrete graphic to represent the U shaped flangeway for street rail. This would probably require a lot of trial and error to get it right, but I've been doing more and more with graphic printouts for roads and buildings and wall-faces, and I'm particularly impressed with how well this papercraft stuff can look with a good printer and some skill/trial and error with the graphics editing programs.
    David, Manchester NH

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    Wow this looks great!! I've always wanted something between the rails that could be pushed away. The gap needed for N scale flanges is HUGE! I just did some track in concrete but will try this idea next time.

    I used styrene and lightweight spackling in between the rails.




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    If you are really serious about the gap be serious about using the right kind of rail. Proto87 sells girder rail. Because it is made tho prototype standards for HO it is delicate enough for N scale. Also get serious about the switches too. Streetrail switches don't have two moving points only one.
    Use what you know about the world to modelÖ
    Learn from modeling what you don't know about the real world.



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    Quote Originally Posted by seanm View Post
    So Steve... ya going to share the image files so we can print our own?
    Sorry for not getting back sooner. I got a bit distracted by the holiday.
    The problem with posting a texture is that everyone's needs will be different. How wide a road, or how big a tarmac is someone modeling? What size turnout does someone need? There are too many variables.

    Instead, here's a quick tutorial using GIMP (I chose GIMP because it's free and available to everyone. But these techniques will work in other apps.) First, do a Google search for Concrete Texture, Pavement Texture, or Asphalt Texture. Look for one's that are shot head-on and don't have any shadows. Copy an image and load it into GIMP. (You'll probably need quite a few in order to avoid repeating the same pattern.)
    The textures are often flat looking, so we'll give it a bit of 3D effect. Duplicate the layer (Layer: Duplicate Layer) and go to Filters: Distorts: Emboss. Set the height value fairly low. When done, set the copy's layer Mode to Hard Light ( Overlay, Soft Light, and Value can also be used sometimes. Whichever looks best.) If the effect is too harsh then just reduce the opacity of this layer.

    Create a new white layer on top of the previous two. Draw the seams and add some cracks if wanted. Select the Emboss filter. Adjust the Azimuth setting till you get good highlights and shadows on the cracks and seams. Set this layer's mode to Hard Light.

    If you want to tint the concrete (such as to tan), create a new layer, use the Fill tool to fill this layer with the color you want. Set this layer's mode to Multiply and adjust the Opacity until it looks right.

    You can grime things up by creating a new layer on top of everything else. Set this layer's mode to Multiply. Set the paint color to black or dark brown and start painting random splotches around. Note that GIMPS default brush shapes aren't very good for this but you can download some good grunge brushes for free. Google search for Free Grunge Brushes for GIMP and you'll find lots of stuff. Download the brushes and load them into your brush folder.

    Pavement.jpg

    Steve S

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    Quote Originally Posted by Rail and Tie View Post
    I wonder if some of the textured linen stock that is available might give more randomness to the surface finish?
    Definitely. Michael's has a lot of different art papers that could be useful. Some of them have variations in color as well that could make it look better. I just used the typing paper I had on hand.

    Steve S

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    Quote Originally Posted by Rail and Tie View Post
    I might try shaving the foam glued between the track with a new razor blade as it shoud give an acceptable height. carefully trimming the clearance for the train wheels should be possible.
    Using sandpaper would probably work, too. Or you could just use a larger code of track. Since the rail will be hidden in the pavement, no one will see that it's oversized.

    Steve S

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