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Thread: Modemo Type 8800

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    Default Modemo Type 8800

    Yes I know it's not north american, yes I know running it with Amtrak stuff isn't prototypical, and yes painting one in Amtrak colors is basically sympathizing with the Axis during WWII, but I love how these things look! However I've never heard of the brand before and would like to know how they run before I buy a couple of them to play with! I've had some Kato trams in the past and absolutely loved them. Hoping someone has some positive experiences to just push me over the edge enough to pick them up!

    :P42171L::SUP2T::SUP2C::SUP2L:

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    I've heard from many tram people that modemo makes good but expensive stuff.

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    Everything I've read about Modemo has been excellent.

    But here's a couple things to consider. Those are streetcars. Top speed around 40 mph. The prototype motors run on much less voltage than the high speed lines or the Northeast Corridor.

    The strongest argument about using these on Amtrak rails is this…
    "How are the passengers at the stations going to board?"
    The platforms on the NEC are four feet above the rails. These care are designed to board from the curb or boarding island a few inches above the rails.

    Now I would say, buy a bunch anyway. Start a streetcar system on your layout or start a new one dedicated to them. Kato and Tomix make street track to make it easy.

    By the way the war is over. It's not treason to buy such cars for any place in North America. Any new equipment purchases are usually from Germany or Japan anyway, as both have thriving traction equipment companies. The ones in North America were devastated by the bus-tification perpetrated by GM, Firestone and the petroleum producers. Only a few cities escaped. They keep recycling the old stuff or are buying new abroad.

    Modern cities are now trying to replace long lost streetcar lines. The reasons are financial and nostalgic. While some cities are using ancient equipment built around WWII like San Francisco and Racine WI. Many others are buying new stuff designed and manufactured abroad and assembled here.

    There are two ways to pick the cars you buy.
    1. Buy the cars in one color. This would be the color scheme of your local transit company. It makes it easy to swap the equipment around during heavy periods or during maintenance needs.
    2. Buy different colors for different routes. Some transit companies color code the different routes. This make it easy for riders to identify their ride and switch operators to route the cars.
    3. Buy multiple color to represent different companies that use a common maintenance pool. By all buying the same equipment each company does have to stock parts or employ mechanics or electricians saving them a lot of money.
    4. Ignore the color and paint into your own scheme.

    By the way much of the text on the cars is often too small to be able to be read.

    One caution, some Japanese equipment is very cheap because it is in kit form and without power. The body may be prepainted and quick and easy to assemble, the separate power chassis will just snap in. This way you run different trains a lot cheaper by swapping bodies.

    The TomyTec LRVs work like this. While I own seven bodies I only have four power chassis. Luckily I was able to add rolling wheels to a dummy chassis and use a powered LRV to pull the dummy. The prototypes often MU cars together during rush hours.

    There is a good possibility that these will be much happier running at 6vDC, much like Katos.

    All Japanese equipment uses dummy pantograghs. When made of plastic they are quite fragile. You can replace them with metal ones Vollmer, Sommerfeldt or Bachmann. Trolley poles are harder to come by. Miniatures by Eric made some excellent ones, but no longer. There are designs in the NCat Source an Project books available from the Yahoo N Scale Traction Group.
    https://groups.yahoo.com/neo/groups/nscaletraction/
    There is an easy to produce one here…
    http://www.nscale.net/forums/album.p...chmentid=53510
    http://www.nscale.net/forums/album.p...chmentid=53511

    Of course a metal pole or pantogragh is an nice stepping stone to running under powered wire.
    Use what you know about the world to model…
    Learn from modeling what you don't know about the real world.



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    I am not sure how Bombardier's supply chain works but at least they are headquartered in Montreal
    http://www.bombardier.com/en/transpo...-vehicles.html
    Last edited by Scotian_Huntress; 1st May 2016 at 06:15 PM. Reason: add link

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    Quote Originally Posted by ChicagoNW View Post
    Everything I've read about Modemo has been excellent.



    The strongest argument about using these on Amtrak rails is this…
    "How are the passengers at the stations going to board?"
    The platforms on the NEC are four feet above the rails. These care are designed to board from the curb or boarding island a few inches above the rails.
    These Tokyo trams from the Toden Arakawa line load at floor level platforms. Note that there are no steps on the car body and the enclosed doors do not reach street level. Both Tomix and Kato make small floor level platforms. The prototype trams were built by Japanese manufacturer Alna Sharyo.

    Modemo trams are reliable but you should limit the power to 12V maximum. Minimum radius is R140 (5.5 inches).

    https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Toden_Arakawa_Line

    https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Toei_8800_series

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    The great thing about model railroading is that it is a fantasy world that we create to please ourselves. That includes, of course, those modelers who struggle to keep everything prototypical. So have fun and run whatever rolling stock tickles your fantasy!
    Cheers!
    Gordon
    Rheinland Bayern Bahn
    http://www.nscale.net/forums/showthr...4-x-9-5-layout

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    Default Modemo 8800

    I have two of them, nice models and good runners

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    Quote Originally Posted by el Gato Gordo View Post
    The great thing about model railroading is that it is a fantasy world that we create to please ourselves. That includes, of course, those modelers who struggle to keep everything prototypical. So have fun and run whatever rolling stock tickles your fantasy!

    Totally agree, do what you want. If you want prototypical fine but I am one who often puts stuff where is has no place. I have Japanese bullet trains, the UK underground Tube, early American Steam and modern day Chicago Metra that run on my layout interchangeably and often at the same time.

    If I like it, I run it!

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