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Thread: Weathering, NO airbrush required

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    My apologies Michael,
    I must have misread your post, sorry, I read it as you
    didn't do the fade till later?
    The Little Rock Line blog


    “Never argue with an idiot. They will only bring you down to their level and beat you with experience." George Carlin

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    Apology accepted - midway through the post it's described as the white coat followed by the two brown coats.

    I will say that I might have done things wrong by using Turpentine as a thinner, rather than mineral spirits. I used it because it's what I had, but I am thinking that maybe it was the reason why it took so long for things to dry. I should probably give it another go and get a better thinner. The white actually went on a bit too thick, in my estimation; it was really hard to get it off and not leave stark white areas, which showed up strong against the brown car body. In fact, I think the browns that followed actually mixed a bit with the white where it was still thick and non-dry. I didn't spray dull-cote between oil colors because it never quite seemed fully dry and I didn't want to seal over wet paint; I just let a few days pass between each color. The final chalk wash DID go over a dull-cote spray, as by that point it had been set aside for two weeks (over the holidays) and I felt a bit more confident that all was dry/cured.

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    Quote Originally Posted by WP&P View Post
    I will say that I might have done things wrong by using Turpentine as a thinner, rather than mineral spirits.
    I've got both and I only use the MS as a cleaner and the TP for weathering. I've had no problems with it?
    Daniel Dawson

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    Quote Originally Posted by WP&P View Post
    Apology accepted - midway through the post it's described as the white coat followed by the two brown coats.
    Thanks!
    OK, so I need glasses.....



    Quote Originally Posted by WP&P View Post
    I will say that I might have done things wrong by using Turpentine as a thinner, rather than mineral spirits. I used it because it's what I had, but I am thinking that maybe it was the reason why it took so long for things to dry. I should probably give it another go and get a better thinner.
    Actually, Mike Confelone prefers Turpentine over Mineral Spirits or thinner saying it breaks it down better???
    I've used straight thinner since I've started, no issues that I've noticed, but gonna grab some turp sometime when I think about it.



    Quote Originally Posted by WP&P View Post
    The white actually went on a bit too thick, in my estimation; it was really hard to get it off and not leave stark white areas, which showed up strong against the brown car body.
    There's nothing wrong with it going thick, but as you stated it is a bit harder to get to off.
    In fact, I got it on rather thick in these following shots and had to work a bit more to get it cleaned off as well.







    Yes it does look awfully white, sometimes almost looks like an Albino, but I did manage to get 99% off and when the browns were applied, the white is nowhere to be seen.
    I've done some cars where I just couldn't get all the white off before appling the browns and if you look, where the white was left, the browns will turn a much lighter shade of the brown due to the white under it. But it won't hurt as it's just another shade of brown!

    If you don't feel it's dry enough, scrub some more or leave it set longer. No harm...

    Here's another shot of a UP loco I did awhile back, I thought I screwed it up royally!



    And once I got the browns applied, Gone!!! The fade is apparent, but not as strong.




    Quote Originally Posted by WP&P View Post
    In fact, I think the browns that followed actually mixed a bit with the white where it was still thick and non-dry. I didn't spray dull-cote between oil colors because it never quite seemed fully dry and I didn't want to seal over wet paint; I just let a few days pass between each color. The final chalk wash DID go over a dull-cote spray, as by that point it had been set aside for two weeks (over the holidays) and I felt a bit more confident that all was dry/cured.
    I was told never to add another layer of color until a sealer coat is applied to the previous one as it will rejuvenate the previous color and blend it all together. But sometimes that will achieve a different look as well.

    Like they always say, there is no rule in weathering, all is fair game.
    The Little Rock Line blog


    “Never argue with an idiot. They will only bring you down to their level and beat you with experience." George Carlin

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    Quote Originally Posted by Allen H. View Post
    Thanks!
    OK, so I need glasses.....





    Actually, Mike Confelone prefers Turpentine over Mineral Spirits or thinner saying it breaks it down better???
    I've used straight thinner since I've started, no issues that I've noticed, but gonna grab some turp sometime when I think about it.





    There's nothing wrong with it going thick, but as you stated it is a bit harder to get to off.
    In fact, I got it on rather thick in these following shots and had to work a bit more to get it cleaned off as well.

    https://lh3.googleusercontent.com/-q...0/DSCN2304.JPG

    https://lh6.googleusercontent.com/-a...0/DSCN2305.JPG

    https://lh6.googleusercontent.com/-o...0/DSCN2306.JPG

    Yes it does look awfully white, sometimes almost looks like an Albino, but I did manage to get 99% off and when the browns were applied, the white is nowhere to be seen.
    I've done some cars where I just couldn't get all the white off before appling the browns and if you look, where the white was left, the browns will turn a much lighter shade of the brown due to the white under it. But it won't hurt as it's just another shade of brown!

    If you don't feel it's dry enough, scrub some more or leave it set longer. No harm...

    Here's another shot of a UP loco I did awhile back, I thought I screwed it up royally!

    https://lh4.googleusercontent.com/-D.../DSCN1983a.jpg

    And once I got the browns applied, Gone!!! The fade is apparent, but not as strong.

    http://4.bp.blogspot.com/-3qQ8_rDO0Y...0/DSCN2005.jpg




    I was told never to add another layer of color until a sealer coat is applied to the previous one as it will rejuvenate the previous color and blend it all together. But sometimes that will achieve a different look as well.

    Like they always say, there is no rule in weathering, all is fair game.
    I might try a grey or a light tan. Give it a rusty ting to the sun bleaching.

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    My phone doesn't take great pics but I thought I'd share my attempt with this method. This is with the white, burnt sienna and burnt umber applied. One difference is that I started with a black oil wash over a GLOSS cote running it only into the cracks, crevices, and panel lines to create shadow. Then I dull cote and started AH's process. This is without is scrapes or concentrated rust areas yet, just very light washes for a minimal weathering effect on this car.

    20170130_202748.jpg

    I'll try to get a better pic when done. It doesn't look quite that washed out in person.
    Daniel Dawson

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    An update with both cars weathered now. One I did with a little more fade and a little more rust. I did do the fade with an airbrush as it basically skips a step (the white application), meaning I can move right to oil weathering with browns immediately. I did shots from both sides as they are physically different.

    20170216_134458.jpg20170216_134508.jpg20170216_134547.jpg20170216_134552.jpg20170216_134607.jpg

    You can also compare the untouched original above.

    Edit: I will also mention that I thought a loaded Q-tip made a pretty good "poor man's" substitute for the micro brushes when doing spots.
    Daniel Dawson

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    Nice technics and after couples of try it gives nice results too... Thanks!
    Steve Richard
    MaiNe MoNtreal Modules

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    Was asked to doll up a couple of cars for a buddy recently. He wanted to list them on eBay cause he was tired of seeing the market flooded with the MTL factory weathered cars. Also wanted to see if there was still a market for these?
    These were done using my oil wash method.

    A Bluford 86' Golden West Service boxcar








    An MDC Gilford boxcar





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    This is a great thread with some good techniques for weathering.

    Robert

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