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Thread: Different areas of Loco Service Terminal - functions of?

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    Default Different areas of Loco Service Terminal - functions of?

    I'm considering modelling the Hinkle Loco Facility in Oregon but as you can guess it is quite large even if scaled down to Nscale. I have put together a Hinkle-like flow in Scarm but would like to compress it more. I would like to know the purpose of each of the areas in the service facility so that I can better focus on what to compress. I'm assuming there are plenty of folks here that know what each of these areas is doing. Can anyone enlighten me here?





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    It might help if you thought of the terminal as a huge neighborhood full service gas station. The one owned and operated by neighbors that, you know. The place that fills the tank, has a car wash, vacuums the floor, washes the windshield, does brakes, oil changes, swaps engines, transmissions, wheels, tires and axles. They just don't do major paint and bodywork. Just remember locomotives are very large beasts. Just as a truck stop is so much bigger than the local gas and go. This service station is that much larger.

    Now this is speculation, since I do not know the facility.

    The tracks closest to the main lines are the pumps, where you get fuel, sand, water, wash the windshields, cleans and empties the bathroom, check brakes, cables and hoses, replacing them if needed. Brake pads on locos are real easy to change. The shed might be for protection during minor parts swaps or house the washing equipment. That tower holds the dry sand and is gravity fed to the locos. The pipes on the bridge carry the various fluids. The big fuel tanks are remotely located, possibly buried.

    The larger the building and further it is away from the mains the more serious the repair. I don't think this shop looks like they do rebuilding of parts, they just swap them. The rebuilding takes place in other shops or at third parties. Body and frame repairs would also take place somewhere else. Panel replacement is doable.

    Somebody who has a better knowledge of the facility can fill in the details and tell you how wrong I was.
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    Looking at the (current) Google Maps, the two southmost tracks appear to be part of the main line. There is some kind of inspection pit thing a bit to the southwest, but the current google earth view shows an intermodal train sitting on the tracks, so I don't think it's part of locomotive service.

    The next two tracks (adjacent to but south of the small shed and the piping) have locomotives, but don't appear to have any equipment, so they may just be storage or bypass/runaround tracks.

    The next two tracks run through the small shed, and there's plenty of piping and stuff around. I'd say/guess these are the fueling/sand/wash/etc. racks.

    Then you've basically got 4 tracks running through the shops, with a runaround track just outside the building. And just west of the shop building, a set of storage tracks.

    Plus a few connecting tracks between the different areas.

    That's how I read it. Pretty close to Chicago, I think. No significant disagreements, anyway.

    The most obvious way to compress, in my mind, is to lose one or two of the storage tracks on the west end, and one or two shop tracks. Two only if really necessary, though. I'd be concerned a two-track shop wouldn't be big enough to carry the "weight" of the installation. I'd lose one of the wash rack tracks before I went down to two shop tracks.
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    On one or two of the cable series Exteme Trains, they go through the servicing areas. If I recall one show reveals a turbocharger being changed. About twice the size of a big motorcycle and four times as heavy, it took quite a bit of work to swap. The other was a pass through servicing.

    Extreme Trains has been available on iTunes for download.
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    Quote Originally Posted by ChicagoNW View Post
    On one or two of the cable series Exteme Trains, they go through the servicing areas. If I recall one show reveals a turbocharger being changed. About twice the size of a big motorcycle and four times as heavy, it took quite a bit of work to swap. The other was a pass through servicing.

    Extreme Trains has been available on iTunes for download.
    That was a fun show to watch, and a particularly interesting episode. I want to say it was the "Transcontinental" episode that covered the shop work on the turbo. I do remember specifically it was Union Pacific, and I think the shop highlighted was North Platte. There's one (CRS whether it was the same episode) where they had to cut out a jammed up traction motor too. And there was another spot where they covered cleaning the toilet, washing the windows, fueling and sanding. I think it was the same episode as the turbochargers.

    Great. Now I'm going to have to go back and binge watch the series again. Thanks, Chicago!
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    Great info guys, thank you very much!

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    Quote Originally Posted by Scotian_Huntress View Post
    Draft Oregon Rail Study 2014 - no site maps but interesting
    https://www.oregon.gov/ODOT/TD/TP/Ra...2014_Draft.pdf
    I have seen the 1st 3 items but that last report was very interesting. Thanks!

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    Assuming I understood everyone, below is what I gathered from everyone's description. Did I follow this correctly? One thing that I did not capture in this version was the through-train fueling racks on the main.



    Also, another shot from the East end. You can see the large fuel storage tanks just North of the facility.

    Last edited by tefsom85; 11th Jan 2017 at 11:08 PM. Reason: Added info about fueling racks on main.

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    So far so good. You've done a convincing compression. Here's a few things from my past experience on BNSF.

    The covered area is a quickie covered minor maintenance and repair shop, primarily used in inclement weather,( a UP specialty!). It may also be the pre-quarterly maintenance inspection bay, maybe.

    All units in service have a FRA required 92-day maintenance schedule. So the shops set things up to run them through production line style. I am not sure about this shop in particular, but will briefly discuss what I know from my experience.

    One end of the main shop building will be the inbound side, presumably to the left. Here a unit gets preinspected and all majorly obvious defects noted. Then it will go into the shop's first stalls where it gets the first steps of its maintenance done. Then it gets to the next stop in the shop and continues into the last stop when it is prepped for outbound testing. Shoved out the other side of the building it is fired up, run the it's required testing and then it's FRA Blue card signed off. At this point it is turned over to the power control people who put it into a consist and stage things on the ready tracks.

    There is a turntable at the far left, which will get used to turn a loco so the cabs are facing a useful direction, dictated by the needs of the power assignments. Also, by the status of the cabs. Not all cabs are 'lead qualified' or occupieable. Having a bad order heater or A/C unit or seats etc.

    Not all trains will stop for service. That depends on the status of the units in the set. Needing FRA or fuel, primarily.

    The wash bay, if they have one, not all shops do, is probably the small attached shed to the left of the main building.

    That bay could also be the 'heavy' shop. Truing wheels, swapping traction motors, power assemblies, etc.

    So, to sum it up a bit, pick one side for inbound maintenance, run them through the shop, outbound sets on the other side, and woohoo. This can make things interesting with your shop layout as you may have to do some jockeying around of units to get cabs right!A usual maintenance can take an average of two to three shifts, depending on what issues crop up on inspection.

    A service track stop, usually only takes an hour or so, depending again, on what needs done. A lot of brake shoes and grease packing of gear boxes can eat up a couple of hours on a set.

    Oh, and lastly, it is extremely rare for a set to stay together for more than a few weeks, as one unit gets pulled out for FRA or other power needs. So a service facility can be an extremely busy place!

    Now, if we only had someone from Hinkle......
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    Great info Badnland!
    Quote Originally Posted by badlandnp View Post
    Now, if we only had someone from Hinkle......
    The sad thing is.. before I rekindled my interest in trains, I lived in Oregon (Portland area) for 20 years. If only I had known.. For some reason, this shop really intrigues me as it has a lot going on. I have collected around 30 locos and so would like to have a fun place to park them. If I ever get off my butt and actually model something, I'm envisioning this will be part of it.

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    If anyone is interested, you can go to google maps for an overhead satellite of this area:

    https://www.google.com/maps/place/Th...4d-119.2894435

    I actually prefer google earth for exploring. There's alot more there than just this shop. As @badlandnp mentioned, there's also a small turntable, there's a hump yard to the east and a wye just to the west, I presume for a route to Canada. As a note, I do see some CP locos here in the service areas.

    If you use google earth, you can paste in: 45°47'39.08" N 119°17'32.73" W for the location

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    You're welcome! Diesel shops are a busy place, not as busy as a steam roundhouse was, but still lots of activity going on!
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    Quote Originally Posted by ChicagoNW View Post
    cleans and empties the bathroom
    they have bathrooms??

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    More like a portapottie, but yeah. The new cabinet comfort cabs have them in the area under the nose. Think about it, up to eight plus hours straight in a vibrating room with no stops. Railroads are too cheap to build rest stops every 50 or 100 miles.
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    Quote Originally Posted by ChicagoNW View Post
    Railroads are too cheap to build rest stops every 50 or 100 miles.
    too funny

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    The older GP's and SD's had a frame with a seat, back in the very early days! 1940'and 50's. This was open under neath for a 'slop bucket!' The funny/sad part is that the NS still used a similar arrangement using 5 gallon buckets and garbage bags until they had to start buying the wide nose units!
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    It could be worse. Back in 1990 when I did a summer internship at Amtrak HQ, the toilets in some cars still went straight through. They were in the midst of adding holding tanks after loosing a lawsuit. Seems that there was an unfortunate incident involving a train and some fisherman who happened to be in a boat underneath the trestle when the train went over.

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    [QUOTE]Not all cabs are 'lead qualified' or occupieable. Having a bad order heater or A/C unit or seats etc[/QUOTE]
    Besides the temporary mechanical issues mentioned, what else would prevent a locomotive from being "lead capable"?

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