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Thread: End of the line operations

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    Default End of the line operations

    I have a small switching layout that represents a lumber industry at the end of the line. Hypothetically it climbs a small grade for at least ten miles to the Industry at the end. Due to switching arrangements at the mill, the locomotive pushes the cars up the grade from behind. Is a caboose needed? (Note: this is a 90's era lumber operation).

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    Typically when a switch crew does long pushes in reverse they have a caboose but it's usually one with it's windows welded over and just becomes a shoving platform. One way you could circumvent that would be to have a run around at the end of the line to get the loco back on the right side of the cars in both directions

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    They don't need a caboose or shove platform. It would make the job a lot easier, otherwise a crew member has to ride the last car to "protect the shove". The chances of falling off or getting injured goes up a lot on a shove that long.

    In the '90's there would likely be a run around track at each end. Especially on a 10 mile long line, but you don't have to have that.
    Karl

    CEO of the Skally Line, an Eastern MN Shortline

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    Not to far from where I live, the Indiana and Ohio railroad serves ( or at least did until recently ) an Anchor Hocking glass plant and an Anchor Hocking distribution center in Lancaster,OH.

    The two facilities are several miles apart.

    When I witnessed the operation ( while working on my masters degree from 2002-2004) twice a day ( about 7 am and 3pm ) a switcher would pull 9 empty 86 foot cars out of the distribution facility and onto the main line.

    The crew would put a shoving platform on the opposite end of the train from the locomotive ( on the pull out if the plant, the shoving platform was between the locomotive and the cars , so this required a tiny bit of switching )

    The cars, with the shoving platform on the south end and the locomotive on the north end, were then shoved to the glass plant.

    At the glass plant, the empties were exchanged for loads, and the loads were then pulled back north to the distribution center. On the return trip,both the locomotive and shoving platform were on the north end of the train.

    All the switches used on this job were trailing point when the train was heading north.

    The shoving platform used on this job was a former slanted coopola caboose. It was equipped with a twin sealed beam headlight and an air horn.

    Paul
    Last edited by pbender; 26th Apr 2017 at 07:40 PM.

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    If you don't have a caboose or shoving platform on the end, you need the conductor or brakeman to be on the last car. Not too bad if the car has space for sitting. Hanging on the ladder for ten miles with a radio in hand is NOT a recommended practice.

    For any distance over fifty feet, a pair of eyes is required at the lead end of a train. There are too many things that could happen as the train backs up. Rolling the cars off the EOL is not good. The heavy equipment needed to rerail them may not have access to the tracks. While the backing train hitting or running over anything on the tracks is possible, most won't do any damage to the train, there are quite a few that could, it is bad taste to deliver cars dripping in gore.
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    @guilford railman

    Hull Oakes Lumber Mill used to get deliveries very similar to this, less the run around track at the end. There are a bunch of videos on YouTube showing this.

    Also, if you were ever a www.carendt.com fan in it's heyday, they showcased a semi-famous microlayout made by Ken Olsen that depicts this very operation. Again, look up Dawson Station on YouTube. It is one helluva layout.

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    You mean this one?


    Yeah, that's a pretty nice looking Inglenook!
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    Quote Originally Posted by TwinDad View Post
    You mean this one?

    Yeah, that's a pretty nice looking Inglenook!
    @TwinDad, Yep, that is it!!!


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    Leave a caboose or transfer car spotted on the spur. When the train arrives to serve the spur, it backs in, grabs the caboose and pushes the train to the industry. When the work is done, the train pulls back to the junction, caboose on the rear. At the junction, the caboose is dropped and away goes the train.

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