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Thread: Making of concrete roads

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    Default Making of concrete roads

    Hi,

    Roads can be made in various ways. Due to our 3D printing activities in tools for creating paved roads we also received a question how to make concrete roads. Although I've designed a roller for such, I was not too happy about the results. In contrast to paved streets with small cobble stones and such, concrete roads need to look a flat. And that seems to be more difficult using rollers and modelling mass.

    But hey, why not trying an other technique?

    I made a little sample and used standard masking tape for the roads. The tape has already a pattern that might suit very well.
    By taping two strips of tape next to another, you get a division line.

    As I wanted to make a two lane road with 12 ft wide x 15 ft long slabs, I cut some extra lines to get the proper sized slabs.

    Then I painted the surface with ordinary acrilic paint. I prefer to mix black, white and brown. That will always give a natural look. Maybe I should have used a bit more white. But overall I'm happy with the colour.
    It ois important that you aplly just enough paint on the tape. It should not soak.


    With an ordinary pencil I highlighted the joints.


    Roads get dirty over time. To mimic the depositin of oil and rubber, I apply some pencil shavings on the road surface. Just rub some pencil shavings over the road surface with your finger.


    Some extra cracks can be used. Therefor I just carved a bit with a knive. Often the cracks are in the middel of the slabs.

    After these extra cuts, some more pencil shavings are rubbed over the surface to highlight the dents.

    To finish the road, you can paint some road markings on the surface. Tamiya masking tape work best. Again I use ordinary acrylic paint.


    A little bit of green and marble sand to finish the roadside.
    And the road is finished:




    Best regards,
    Maurice
    https://railnscale.com/


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    Looks like a great technique. I'm wondering what happens when the adhesive on the back of the tape gives way after several years.

    I guess then you "pour" a patch and paint it like new concrete!

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    In general, a very good-looking technique.

    To my eye, though, the texture of the tape is a bit out of scale, at least for the concrete roads I am familiar with. They tend to be quite smooth. To my eye this looks more like maybe a very aged asphalt.
    Never mistake a guy who talks a lot for a guy who has something to say...

    CH&FR Site and Blog: http://www.chfrrailroad.net and http://blog.chfrrailroad.net
    Appalachian Railroad Technology: http://www.apprailtech.com


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    Interesting, I too wonder about the adhesion after a long time, I'd like to see how it fares. The look is not bad though.

    But (here it comes ...) that's all well and good for exactly straight roads, but what about random curved roads? I do my roads from sheets of gray foam and so I can cut out any curve I want from that sheet. But you won't be able to do that.

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    I wouldn't be too concerned about loss of adhesion. Maurice is using the old tan masking tape. Have you ever tried to peel that stuff off after it has been on for a few days? It fuses to the surface. Blue tape, on the other hand, does not stick as well.

    Curves and corners are a valid issue, but those never happen in the real world.
    Cheers!
    Gordon
    Rheinland Bayern Bahn
    http://www.nscale.net/forums/showthr...4-x-9-5-layout

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    You could lay enough tape to cover the whole curve area then cut away the parts that are “not road”. That would kind of mess with using the tape seams as road seams, though...
    Never mistake a guy who talks a lot for a guy who has something to say...

    CH&FR Site and Blog: http://www.chfrrailroad.net and http://blog.chfrrailroad.net
    Appalachian Railroad Technology: http://www.apprailtech.com


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    Great idea. Tape is conveniently sticky. Easy to cut, form, "sculpt" joints and cracks and forms over various surface.
    I have used masking tape as a way to model slate shingles, like on a farmhouse and barn model, a common practice in my area of the country.

    I used a double layer as well then cut and laid them on the model roof. The tackiness was the inspiration to try, but I was unhappy with the uniformity and texture. My solution was CA glue. The thin stuff. It would not take too much do a thin coat. This hardened the tape and the CA left a bit of an uneven texture and "crystallized" a bit creating a bit more variation in the finish. After priming/painting it was a decent looking rendering of scale slate. After many years, this method has held up to time.

    While a roof is small compared to a road, there may be some other methods you could use to coat / finish the tape to yield a finish suitable to your needs. I have not used anything else but perhaps thinned white glue, any number of craft finishes or spray coats might also help achieve the look.

    barn temp.jpg
    Steve - Jugtown Modeler..............Don't know enough about railroading yet, but scale modeling is my life..............Web-Folio

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