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Thread: Which which is better for which?

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    Default Which which is better for which?

    So, I have enough hobby money to pick up Photoshop Elements. I have tried and REALLY do not like Irfanview. I also have GIMP. I'm wanting to stitch photos together into a backdrop for my layout and need some educated advice. My question is: would this process be easier using Photoshop Elements? I don't necessarily want to spend days learning how to do this using GIMP if it would take an hour or two with Elements. Of course, if GIMP has less of a learning curve then I'll obviously go with GIMP.

    So, which which? GIMP or Elements if $ is not an issue.
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    I could never get used to GIMP but that's probably because I started with PhotoShop way back when. Currently I use Elements and it does everything I need it for.

    If your main purpose is stitching photos to make a panoramic, have you tried PTGui? They have a trial version you can download and then decide if it's for you. All the pros use it and rave about it.

    https://www.ptgui.com/

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    Can you use a phone or camera with panoramic picture taking setting?

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    There are a few panorama stitching programs on this website , some free , https://photo.wondershare.com/photo-...-software.html
    As long as I can model in N-scale, I know I'm not old

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    I just purchased a 20 megapixel camera to get the job done right. I can send the photos wirelessly to my laptop and will use Windows compatible software to build my backdrop. I will not just be stitching photos together but intend to do as much photo manipulation as possible to create the effect I'm looking for. I just need to know if purchasing Photoshop Elements will have benefits that make it worth the money, mainly the learning curve when compared to GIMP.

    Thanks for the responses so far.
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    This doesn't answer your question about programs, but @MystRacing (though he hasn't been on here in a while) and @pwh70 had some good info on photo backdrops here:

    http://www.nscale.net/forums/showthr...hoto-Backdrops

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    Since you didn't get a direct answer, I can add this but from a discussion with people several years ago (not specific to stitching) is photoshop elements and paintshop pro are both capable and fairly easy to learn.

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    Just seeing this thread (after OT's mention...) - I've done stitching with Elements... it's been a while but the results are good. Like you mentioned, I too like taking a group of quality pics with a good camera and stitching them together into a wide panoramic photo.
    I haven't used GIMP so I can't compare the two.
    Elements doesn't take an hour or two to learn how to stitch photos together.... the process is intuitive, and only takes a few minutes once you have your photo files selected.
    Happy to help if you'd like specifics.
    -Paul

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    @Bronman

    I have an old version of Photoshop Elements that for some reason keeps chugging along with new OS releases on my aging Mac. I have been looking for alternatives, because when the Mac eventually gives up the ghost, I want to give myself the option of switching to a cheaper alternative. Through time I have been looking at Gimp but not liked it much, mainly because of the crappy user interface, but I've had no reason to believe that it is technically inferior to Photoshop. Elements being a subset of the full Photoshop package, of course.

    Lately it seems Gimp has improved the user experience vastly, and I know where I go next.
    Stitching should be more or less the same exercise, regardless of which program you chose. You may even be able to find specialised software for it.

    However ...

    You mention that you have purchased a 20 megapixel camera, and this could make the difference, I think. I used to work at Phase One which makes really high-end multimegapixel cameras. To record a full-color image in one exposure, the image sensor in every camera is covered with a mosaic of red, green and blue filters. These are adjacent to each other, so eg. the light entering a red pixel is not exactly the same as the light entering the neighbouring green pixel. We're talking micrometers, yes, but it does show. Early cameras produced pictures with visible artifacts and cheap cameras still do today, especially when they produce JPEG pictures.

    With a camera like that, you may want to shoot in RAW image format, which effectively is a direct print of the image sensor, and thus you need some kind of "dark room" software to produce the final images. Phase One cameras come with such software, which is also available as a standalone product, and for a while it was by far the best around. Some time after I left the company I noticed that Photoshop suddenly came on par with this process and I wondered how they got so good so quickly. I then met an old colleague who had invented the algorithm, and he told me he'd gone solo and made a competing software product because of disagreements at Phase One. His company was later bought by Adobe, and while I don't have any proof, two plus two does make four. To me, that is how Adobe improved the RAW development process.

    Long story short, if you want to shoot in RAW - and you should, because the pictures are vastly better than the camera's built-in JPEG efforts - go with Photoshop.
    The RAW processor is included in Elements, but the format is not standard and each camera model has its own footprint.

    Just make sure that whatever program you choose can handle the RAW format from your camera.

    Good luck
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