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Thread: Different species of conifers

  1. #1
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    Default Different species of conifers

    There are a number of methods out there for building evergreen trees, from sticking bristles through a pair of wires and spinning it with a drill, to gluing green foam onto weeds.

    One thing I haven't seen anybody try too hard to do is represent different kinds of evergreen in the same forest. I wouldn't have paid attention until I lived here full time... but after a couple years here, I have become acutely aware that some places are ponderosa pine, others douglas fir and larch, others cedar, others spruce.

    Up close, one distinguishes them by the groupings of their needles (or scales, for cedar.) From a distance of some hundreds of feet, however, one can't make out the needles, but is aware of their different habits -- firs 'reaching for the sky' in every branch, larches having branches that look sort of like fingers arched backwards, pines either straight out or firlike, cedar branches drooping.

    I haven't seen many people worry about that difference, or attempt to explicitly model the different species.

    Anybody have any clever ideas for how to achieve this effect (short of bending every branch on every tree in a certain direction to make it look right?)

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    I have not done this but first thing comes to my mind is varying the height, overall shape, and perhaps most important the color. I think that would capture a good percentage of the difference. Maybe enough to do the job for background trees.

    Then spend some time bending every branch to make some killer foreground trees. Let the viewers brain do the rest.
    Never mistake a guy who talks a lot for a guy who has something to say...

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    I've given a fair bit of thought but haven't come up with anything. I think it may require some time pestering a florist and perusing their stock for natural weeds.
    Daniel Dawson

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    Search the forums for the poster named "grove den". He is a master model tree maker from the Netherlands. He makes many different species of conifers, and his work is the best I have ever seen. His deciduous trees are equally superb.

    His web site is largely in Dutch, but if you click around, you can find some tree pictures with English descriptions:
    https://mbbgroveden.com/

    He is also on Facebook:
    https://www.facebook.com/MBBGroveDen/

    He has tutorials on some of the model railroad forums. Well worth searching for them!

    - Jeff

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