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Thread: Street Lighting question?

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    Default Street Lighting question?

    I am getting a bit ahead of myself here BUT was wondering how far apart (in real inches/mm) do you guys place your average street light poles? I was thinking about 100' (1:1) so about 7.5" scale, or is that too far?

    We don't have light poles in our area so can't run out and measure the distance
    Cheers Tony

    "Knowing what to do is one thing ... being able to do it is another"
    "It is easy to criticize ... a lot harder when you have to justify it"

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    I'm thinking it varies depending on the area. They would be closer together in a busy downtown sort of area than they would be in, say, a residential area.

    FWIW, my neighborhood has a light at either end of the block and one in middle of the block, which would put them about 264 feet apart.

    -Mark

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    Tony,

    Check out this website: https://www.pps.org/article/streetlights

    "The minimum required space between lights might meet lighting standards, but may or may not achieve the desired effect. For example, a typical DOT lighting scheme for an average street 40' in width (two traffic and two parking lanes) would have 25' to 40' cobra head lights every 125'-150', staggered on either side of the street. An alternative to this vehicle-oriented scheme is to reduce the height of the fixtures to 13' and place them every 50' and opposite each other."

    That is just one way of looking at how to space the lights because prototypical spacing is based on light coverage of a given area. I've been working on my streets and I spaced mine at 10" on my sketches. When I get close to mounting the lights, I will power them up to see if it gives the appearance I am looking for. More modern layouts will have good overlap of light where transition era won't. REally comes down to what look you want and how bright your lights are.

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    My main street has the post lights pretty close, but elsewhere the pole lights are spread out more.




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    Thanks guys and Ender, how far apart did you place your "main street" lights? They appear to be pretty much the way I would like mine as well, spacing wise.
    Cheers Tony

    "Knowing what to do is one thing ... being able to do it is another"
    "It is easy to criticize ... a lot harder when you have to justify it"

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    Quote Originally Posted by Ender View Post
    My main street has the post lights pretty close, but elsewhere the pole lights are spread out more.
    Man I really love that night scene,good job. Especially the lighting under the bridge.
    I hear the train a comin'; it's rollin' 'round the bend

    "
    N scale is like a wide angle lens. O scale is like a zoom lens. Itís all good. " -Twindad

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    Ender,

    Sorry I should have commented on your scene and lighting as well - it looks excellent. IF I can create that feel, I'll be more than happy. Care to let us in on what "lights" you used?
    Cheers Tony

    "Knowing what to do is one thing ... being able to do it is another"
    "It is easy to criticize ... a lot harder when you have to justify it"

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    Thanks. Let's see... I guess most of those main street lights are around 4" apart, but one of them is a little off, so 3"-5" on that one. I staggered them and tried to place them to light up the walkways on the sides of those buildings. I was also trying to avoid any awnings.




    Those post lights were grain of rice bulbs, but one might be able to scratch build something similar with tiny LEDs and glass beads. You can see a lot more about my lighting in my lighting thread.

    Lighting is an exciting dimension in our little model railroads. Just be aware: it's addictive. :twitch:

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    Thanks Ender and yep, lighting IS addictive.

    While I try to get my scenes as believable as possible, it is the lighting that provides the look, the atmosphere and the feel, it brings everything to life. Believable lighting makes the structure more believable and something that can be related to; as such, I place a lot of emphasis and time in trying to get my lighting right be it for a building or (more importantly) the streets.

    Will have a look at your lighting thread as well and thanks for the link - appreciate it.
    Cheers Tony

    "Knowing what to do is one thing ... being able to do it is another"
    "It is easy to criticize ... a lot harder when you have to justify it"

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    Quote Originally Posted by Ender View Post
    Lighting is an exciting dimension in our little model railroads. Just be aware: it's addictive.
    "Hello, my name is Mark and I'm a lightaholic."

    "Hi, Mark!"



    -Mark

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