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Thread: Inserting Risers

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    Default Inserting Risers

    This is more of a tip than a technique; however, it is/would be, a good idea to put your risers in place before doing any track work if building open grid/cookie cutter or L Girder/cookie cutter bench work.

    Ask me why I believe this to be a good idea
    Cheers Tony

    "Knowing what to do is one thing ... being able to do it is another"
    "It is easy to criticize ... a lot harder when you have to justify it"

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    Been there, done that! I found a block with holes pre-drilled through it, glued to the side of the riser gave me a way to drive screws up into the roadbed from below.
    "Do Not Hump!?!?! Does that mean what I think it means?!?"--Michelle Blanchard

    "People saw wood and say nothing, but railroad men saw trains and say things that are better left unprinted."--Charles De Lano Hine

    Down with UP

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    And the books don't tell you, but you can never have enough clamps when doing cookie-cutter layouts!
    "Do Not Hump!?!?! Does that mean what I think it means?!?"--Michelle Blanchard

    "People saw wood and say nothing, but railroad men saw trains and say things that are better left unprinted."--Charles De Lano Hine

    Down with UP

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    Why, Tony, why?
    Cheers!
    Gordon
    Rheinland Bayern Bahn
    http://www.nscale.net/forums/showthr...4-x-9-5-layout

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    Quote Originally Posted by el Gato Gordo View Post
    Why, Tony, why?
    Oh hell - I dunno, just thought I'd throw it in for the heck of it, unless you like watching your track work going every which way but loose
    Cheers Tony

    "Knowing what to do is one thing ... being able to do it is another"
    "It is easy to criticize ... a lot harder when you have to justify it"

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    I've been wondering how it was going to work with the track all assembled. I've never tried the cookie cutter method of layout building, so I truly don't know the best way to do it.

    Best of luck with the next steps!
    Cheers!
    Gordon
    Rheinland Bayern Bahn
    http://www.nscale.net/forums/showthr...4-x-9-5-layout

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    Gordon,

    My apologies, I thought you were having a shot at me over the "ask me how I know" comment. I'll try to explain how this all works though and hope it helps clarify a few things.

    I will assume you know what the "cookie Cutter Method" is - cutting out your ply (or whatever your base material is) around the shape of your track plan and removing (optional) all the ply etc that wont be supporting your track. This method is normally done using either an "Open Grid" or "L Girder" bench work fabrication.

    Unlike "tabletop" bench work where you might use something along the lines of woodlands foam risers to create your grades, the cookie cutter method allows you to "bend" the ply to form the grade. In order to do that, you need to install risers, of various heights, that raise (or lower) the ply wood (sub roadbed) to form the grade. Some people leave the ply on top of the frame work and that becomes their layouts "ground level". Others, such as myself, like to have my "ground level" a little higher than the frame work. That allows me to have a decline grade, rivers, lakes, depressions etc that would sit on top of the frame work and not below it. In my case, my "ground level" is 1.5" above the top of the frame work. This means I can have a 1.5" deep river etc, without having to drop below the frame work. That being said, you can go as deep as you want. My starting point is 1.5" above the top of the frame work - that will be my layouts ground level.

    So - it pays to put your risers in before your track work. What I should have said (to be clearer) is, if your "ground level" is going to be raised above the top of your frame work, it is easier and quicker to install the risers needed to form that raised ground level BEFORE you lay out your track plan.

    Hope that makes some sort of sense. Trying to install 20 or 30 risers for you ground level with the track laid out and pinned and so forth is a pain in the posterior ... the pins holding the track work in place pop out, the track becomes distorted and, essentially, you have to go back and reshape everything, it's just double handling. Once your "ground level" is set, all you need to do is cut the ply following the shape of the track work then add the additional risers for inclines or declines without adversely effecting your track work.

    This is a pretty good example of how it should look once cut out, shaped and ready for the track work to be laid. I repeat - this is only an example of the Open Grid/Cookie Cutter method of creating your bench work:

    Cheers Tony

    "Knowing what to do is one thing ... being able to do it is another"
    "It is easy to criticize ... a lot harder when you have to justify it"

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    Quote Originally Posted by wombat457 View Post
    This is more of a tip than a technique; however, it is/would be, a good idea to put your risers in place before doing any track work if building open grid/cookie cutter or L Girder/cookie cutter bench work.

    Ask me why I believe this to be a good idea
    At the risk of being boorish, I think Linn Westcott et al pretty much established that doctrine more than 5O years ago.
    Paul Schmidt

    Southern Railway's Slate Fork Branch


    Proud member of the Milwaukee Road Historical Association and the Southern Railway Historical Association

    Check out Appalachian Railroad Modeling!

    Did l mention that I still like the SP&S?

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    I have no doubt some one, some where, worked that out before I did
    Cheers Tony

    "Knowing what to do is one thing ... being able to do it is another"
    "It is easy to criticize ... a lot harder when you have to justify it"

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    No apology necessary, Tony. I was having a little shot at you, but wondered about the chaos to your lovely track work.

    I do wonder, also, whether one of the small rotary saws such as by Bosch or Micro Mark might make the cuts without excessive vibration.

    Michael Rose's build threads are great instructionals on cookie cutter construction.
    Cheers!
    Gordon
    Rheinland Bayern Bahn
    http://www.nscale.net/forums/showthr...4-x-9-5-layout

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    My wife bought me a great Dremmel Ultra Saw for doing the cutting but don't think that will make a lot of difference when it comes to the vibrations. I wish I could just trace around everything then remove the track work in its entirety. I probably could but that would take a lot of work and possibly damage things more than any vibration or small movement would. I'll take a look at Michael Roses build threads for what he suggests.

    This is really the part of the build that I have been dreading because I'm simply no good at it what so ever. With me, it is a case of all I can do is my best and hope it works out okay. With that being said, this is the shambles I've created so far:





    All I'm using is a jig saw and removing the pins as I get to them, do the cut, stop, replace the pins and carry on regardless
    Cheers Tony

    "Knowing what to do is one thing ... being able to do it is another"
    "It is easy to criticize ... a lot harder when you have to justify it"

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    Your layout looks great. Remember: Once itís covered with scenery, all benchwork - whether professional woodworker or amateur, will disappear.

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    Thanks mate, appreciate the confidence boost
    Cheers Tony

    "Knowing what to do is one thing ... being able to do it is another"
    "It is easy to criticize ... a lot harder when you have to justify it"

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