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Thread: Body mounting Micro-Trains couplers

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    Default Re:Body mounting Micro-Trains couplers

    Aaron, all of the newer MT couplers are RDA (Reverse Draft Angle).I think the biggest difference is in the coupler box and overall length of the coupler itself.

    There are also some different offset (Vertically) couplers available.

    The couplers can be cut off from the trucks and be body mounted but be aware that the boxes on the truck mounted couplers are fairly wide and could possibly interfere with the truck's swivel on tight curves

    I am planning on body mounting all of my couplers soon.I am planning on using the 1023 couplers.They, like the 1025s have a nice narrow box.
    Catt
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    Default Re:Body mounting Micro-Trains couplers

    Basically, the difference between the couplers has to do with the style of box used on the coupler, and how high off the rail the floor of the car needs to be.

    The 1015 is commonly used for locomotives, though some cars use it as well (MTL's 100 Ton 3-bay hoppers for example)

    The 1016 is basically the same box as the 1015, but with a longer shank

    The 1023/1025 is a nice general purpose coupler. The 1025 is the part number for an unassembled 1023.

    The 1026 is similar to the 1025, but it has a bracket on it. It's used for some special applications, especially some older MTL flats and gondolas (MTL has redesigned the floors on these, so the 1026 is no longer needed)

    The 1027 has a pin in line with the hole for the mounting screw. If you look on the underside of some cars (mostly boxcars from MTL,Atlas and LBF, but a few others as well), you will see two dimples near the end of the car. one of these is for the mounting screw, the other is for the centering pin.

    There are a few other couplers that are sometimes used for body mounting, but these are the ones used most frequently.

    RDA actually refers to the cut of the pulling surface of coupler. Before the RDA couplers came around, MTL couplers tended to "climb" over one another, causing quite a few unwanted uncouplings.

    Paul
    Last edited by pbender; 6th Apr 2017 at 02:37 PM.
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    Default Re:Body mounting Micro-Trains couplers

    Thanks for the advice Paul and Catt! I was wondering what those dimples were! Now all I have to do is mount lots of couplers.

    I am also planning to lower the ride height of a few flatcars because they look a little top-heavy when compared to the prototype. I'm planning to notch the end of the car to fit the coupler and than shaving off some of the truck bolster to correct the height. This mod looks great in HO but I have never seen it in N scale. This is the first real modification that I will have done on my rolling stock (scary). Maybe in the future I'll show some before and after pics. Does anyone else have any unique coupler modifications?
    Aaron

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    Default Re:Body mounting Micro-Trains couplers

    Does Micro-Trains make an offset coupler? I have some 89ft flat cars that I want to fit with couplers that will allow me to lower the car height without changing the coupler height. I don't think the MT website describes their products very well. Thanks!!
    Aaron

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    Default Re:Body mounting Micro-Trains couplers

    Quote Originally Posted by "afhirschfeld"
    Does Micro-Trains make an offset coupler? I have some 89ft flat cars that I want to fit with couplers that will allow me to lower the car height without changing the coupler height. I don't think the MT website describes their products very well. Thanks!!
    You should be able to use the 2004 couplers. They have a slightly upward offset. This is the coupler used for the Kato Dash-8 and SD40-2 (perhaps others as well). It's also the recomendation for the Bowser PRR N-5 series cabooses.

    Paul
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    Default Re:Body mounting Micro-Trains couplers

    I am new to these forums (I just joined today). I am also new to N scale modeling. In fact, I haven't modeled in 30 years (when I was a teenager, and that was HO). I quickly discovered this thread, and thought this might be an appropriate place to ask a question.

    Having said that, I may have bitten off more than I can chew. My roster is still pretty scant, but they are all micro trains coupler equipped. I purchased a Bachmann Spectrum 2-8-0 on the internet without researching it thoroughly only to discover that the only micro trains coupler conversion is for the tender only. The loco comes equipped with a snap in dummy coupler in the pilot. This can be replaced with a snap in rapido coupler. I really want to switch with this loco. Anybody out there have any ideas? Thanks.

    Artiedeco

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    Default Re:Body mounting Micro-Trains couplers

    Artiedeco- I have seen some people who have converted the BMan 2-8-0s front coupler to a MT. If you ever visit the forums over at www.atlassrr.com you might be able to find a thread that mentions what coupler to use. I do know know what one it is right off the bat since I dont have a BMan 2-8-0. Wish I could have been more help.

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    Default Re:Body mounting Micro-Trains couplers

    In adding to the Trucks and couplers subject... Where is it published that lists all the different types of trucks (1:1 scale) (i.e. Bettendorf, Roller Bearing, etc.)? I've never been able to find any answers to what freight car types used what style of truck and what years/eras where each type is or was in use. Was a it a Railroad standard that was preordered or a car manufacturer that chose the truck type?


    CNW_in_IA

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    Default Re:Body mounting Micro-Trains couplers

    There was an article in MR a couple months ago showing different types of freight trucks (can't put my hands on it at the moment to say which).

    Dick
    Dick,

    Usually, when all is said and done, there's a lot more said than done!

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    Default Re:Body mounting Micro-Trains couplers

    Quote Originally Posted by "CNW_in_IA"
    Where is it published that lists all the different types of trucks (1:1 scale) (i.e. Bettendorf, Roller Bearing, etc.)?
    I have been looking for something like this myself. This would be a great addition to this site. If anyone has a handle on it, let me know, we can publish as an article.

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    Default Re:Body mounting Micro-Trains couplers

    Quote Originally Posted by "absnut"
    There was an article in MR a couple months ago showing different types of freight trucks (can't put my hands on it at the moment to say which).

    Dick
    Model Railroader, December 2003 Issue, pages 72 - 77.

    I can probably get you the answers from this article if I know what it is you want. Otherwise, I will sit and see if I can summarize this article and submit it to Todd.

    I want to be careful I don't infringe on any copyrights that Jeff Wilson (the author) or Model Railroader have on the article.

    Dalman Trucks had 8 springs mounted on different levels. It was designed and built by the American Steel Foundries (ASF)

    Barber S-2 Truck or stabilized truck was the most commonly used during the solid bearing truck era.

    ASF A3 Ride Control was developed and used mostly post WWII.

    The Allied Full Cushion Truck is a complex truck, the springs are outboard of the journal boxes instead of under the bolster ends.

    The Barber-Bettendorf caboose truck has eliptical leaf springs, similar to the ones you'd find on an automobile. They were initially made with solid bearing trucks.

    Roller Bearing trucks such as:

    the 70-ton ASF Ride Control uses roller bearings that turn with the axles. The roller bearings replace the old journal boxes.

    :arrow: (The load capacity of the truck refers to the total weight of the fully loaded car, not the weight over each individual truck. So, if a car could hold 70 tons of material, the trucks under it would have to be rated at 70 tons each.)

    The 100-ton Barber S-2 truck with roller bearings look similar to the ASF Ride Control roller bearing trucks, but there are some small differences not readily apparent without having a picture of both side by side for comparison.

    The Barber-Bettendorf caboose truck is the most popular modern-era caboose truck. It was similar to the journal-box equipped B-B truck, but had roller bearings instead.

    All of these descriptions are from the captions of the pictures Mr. Wilson provided with his article.

    One note: You may see references to Archbar trucks, which were banned from interchange service in December 1939, because they are bolted together and are made of pressed steel and bar components. They tended to loosen up over time, causing numerous derailments.

    There is also the Andrews truck with cast steal sideframes. They look a lot like the Bettendorf trucks, some were made by the Bettendorf Company. You could tell an Andrews truck by the steel retaining straps extending from the base of the journal boxes to the sideframe.

    With wheels, normally 70 ton trucks used 33" wheels, 100 ton trucks use 36" wheels, and 125 ton trucks use 38" wheels. An exception is that 28' wheels are used on triple-deck auto-racks to allow them to negotiate tighter clearance. You may wonder if you want to use ribbed or smooth backed wheels on your trucks. Ribbed wheels were usually of cast iron, with the treads heat-treated. The ribs helped dissipate heat from braking. They were banned from interchange in 1970.

    Steel wheels nowadays are either single-wear or two-wear. The information is usually stencilled on the car ends. Single-wear wheels are scrapped after the tread profile wears to a certain point. Two-wear wheels have a thicker rim and can be recut and reshaped, but they are more expensive than single-wear. Two-wear wheels are more economically used on heavy-duty cars.
    Joe/KC6NLX
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    Default Re:Body mounting Micro-Trains couplers

    Here is a link to some good info on MT couplers:

    http://www.modelbaneteknik.dk/n-scale/index-e.htm

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