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Thread: what is the difference between atlas code 80 switches?

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    Default Re:what is the difference between atlas code 80 switches?

    I think...
    Code 80 Standard switch is a 4 inch turn-out. Works OK for yard leads and such. They are sold with manual or electric switch machines.

    Code 80 #6 is a 6 inch turn-out more suited for main-line / high speed turn-out applications. Also sold with manual or electric switch machine.

    Code 80 Custom is a 4 or 6 inch switch without the switch machine. Possibly intended for the addition of a ground throw switch machine.

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    Default Re:what is the difference between atlas code 80 switches?

    If I am not mistaken,

    All the custom turnouts do not come with any provision for controlling the turnout. You need to add either a ground throw or switch motor.

    The standard has some sort of control included with the turnout. Either a manual throw or remote throw.

    Also, I may be mistaken here but all the code 80 turnouts are #6.
    neynoodle@gmail.com

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    Default Re:what is the difference between atlas code 80 switches?

    Switch Numbers (#4, #6, #8, etc.) are not inch dimensions, although in N scale they may appear to be that. They apply equally to all scales. The number can be thought of as a measure of the tightness of the curve exiting the turnout. A No. 4 turnout moves away from the straight line of the "main" a distance of 1 unit in a run of 4 units, and exits at an angle of about 14 degrees from the "main'. A No. 6 turnout moves away 1 unit in a run of 6 units, and exits at an angle of about 9 degrees.
    The Atlas Custom N-Line turnouts are not only for finger-throws (such as those from Caboose Industries), but are also suitable for any kind of concealed operation mechanisms, whether powered (switch machines or switch motors) or unpowered (e.g. wire linkages from remote levers). I'm using them on my layout, using automotive choke cables to operate the turnouts from levers on my control panel. I'm appealed to by the idea of levers, built into the schematic track plan, which both show the current position of the turnout and operate the turnout when moved.
    Phil

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    Default Re:what is the difference between atlas code 80 switches?

    Quote Originally Posted by "ragnarock4"
    Also, I may be mistaken here but all the code 80 turnouts are #6.
    You were, in fact mistaken.

    Atlas Code 80 turn outs come in the Standard (#4) and #6 varieties. Both sizes come in three flavors: manual, remote, and custom. All have insulated frogs.

    As previously mentioned, you need to add an operating mechanism to the custom turnouts.

    Regards,

    Scott Chisholm

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    Default Re:what is the difference between atlas code 80 switches?

    Quote Originally Posted by "pryman60"
    Switch Numbers (#4, #6, #8, etc.) are not inch dimensions, although in N scale they may appear to be that. They apply equally to all scales. The number can be thought of as a measure of the tightness of the curve exiting the turnout. A No. 4 turnout moves away from the straight line of the "main" a distance of 1 unit in a run of 4 units, and exits at an angle of about 14 degrees from the "main'. A No. 6 turnout moves away 1 unit in a run of 6 units, and exits at an angle of about 9 degrees.
    The Atlas Custom N-Line turnouts are not only for finger-throws (such as those from Caboose Industries), but are also suitable for any kind of concealed operation mechanisms, whether powered (switch machines or switch motors) or unpowered (e.g. wire linkages from remote levers). I'm using them on my layout, using automotive choke cables to operate the turnouts from levers on my control panel. I'm appealed to by the idea of levers, built into the schematic track plan, which both show the current position of the turnout and operate the turnout when moved.
    Phil
    phil,
    got any pics?
    would love to see your 'remote' manual TO linkages

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    Default Re:what is the difference between atlas code 80 switches?

    This is likely not what Phil has, but I think it is essentially what you are talking about:


    http://www.humpyard.com/

    Doug Stuard
    Doug Stuard,

    In the wilds of Northern Virginia

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    Default Remote Mech'l Turnout Control

    Those look prototypical and fun, Doug, but they aren't like mine.
    My control panel has the usual schematic track plan, but instead of using coloured tape or paint for the track lines I've cut them from 1/4" by 1/4" wood strip stock. The track lines are therefore raised up from the panel, and are painted a contrasting colour from the panel background. Where turnouts occur, a 1" long piece of the 1/4" by 1/4" stock is separate from the adjacent track lines and is hinged so it can be 'thrown' to one branch or the other. Throwing the turnout piece of the track plan activates the undertable linkage and throws the turnout. A glance at the panel, even from a few feet away, always shows the current position of every turnout.
    The linkages use cables originally made for lawn mower throttles. They're stranded steel cable sheathed in rubber. I cut them to the desired lengths, and crimp wire terminal connectors onto both ends. Below each turnout, a wood block pivotted by the cable throws the turnout using a vertical piece of spring wire which rises up through the roadbed and through the turnout throwbar. Magnetic tape holds the panel levers firmly in one position or the other.
    I'm still adding block control electrical switches to the panel. When it's finished and lettered I'll post pics of it. I'll also show you the undersides of the panel and the layout, which look like an oldfashioned manual telephone switchboard.

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    Default Re:what is the difference between atlas code 80 switches?

    Quote Originally Posted by "dstuard"
    This is likely not what Phil has, but I think it is essentially what you are talking about:


    http://www.humpyard.com/

    Doug Stuard
    doug,
    i know of humpyard levers/actuators,
    and they are pretty cool looking.
    they are something i would like to get...
    if i cant make my own

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    Default Re:what is the difference between atlas code 80 switches?

    Turnout vary from manufacturer to manufacturer.

    Atlas code 80 turnouts

    Standard (#4) turnouts turn 15 degrees from the main in 5 inches
    Standard (#6) turnouts turn 10 degrees from the main in 6 1/4 inches

    Customs as already mentioned require turnout control means

    Peco code 55 turnouts (code 80 rail buried partially into the ties)

    Short (#4) turnouts turn 10 degrees from the main in 4 3/8 inches
    Medium (#6) turnouts turn 10 degrees from the main in 5 3/4 inches
    Like train travel, life is not the destination, but the stops along the way

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    Default Re:what is the difference between atlas code 80 switches?

    Bassethound,

    Thanks for those tidbits. I had always wondered about the geometry of the PECO turnouts.

    Regards,

    Scott Chisholm

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