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TwinDad
21st Dec 2011, 11:25 PM
OK, I hope "tooling" is the best place to put this...

I need to trim down the top edge of my fascia in a couple of places to follow the contour of the layout ground...

It's 1/8" Masonite...

I'm wondering what the best tool to tackle this with would be...

I have a Dremel, and I have the little attachment to the chuck that provides a depth guide, so I can keep the bit from going too far in and damaging the foam behind the fasica...

I was thinking of using the "rotary tool" blade - looks like a drill bit, but is made for cutting on the side instead of drilling holes - like for the rotary cutters used to cut electrical box holes in drywall...

Or one of the micro-saw blades...

What do you use?

Jazzbass01
21st Dec 2011, 11:41 PM
Do you have a zip cutter? (the drywall cutter) That would be my choice, but any rotary cutter is going to make a mess..

TwinDad
21st Dec 2011, 11:48 PM
Do you have a zip cutter? (the drywall cutter) That would be my choice, but any rotary cutter is going to make a mess..

No, but the bit I have for the Dremel essentially converts it into a zip cutter.

SANDBOX1
21st Dec 2011, 11:52 PM
Sounds like you have what you need there. That would do the trick but you are going to have a mess on your hands,lol. Good luck.

TwinDad
21st Dec 2011, 11:57 PM
Sounds like you have what you need there. That would do the trick but you are going to have a mess on your hands,lol. Good luck.

That's what I'm afraid of. Oh well, I'll just have to keep the shop-vac handy.

pbender
21st Dec 2011, 11:57 PM
I have a Dremel, and I have the little attachment to the chuck that provides a depth guide, so I can keep the bit from going too far in and damaging the foam behind the fasica...

I was thinking of using the "rotary tool" blade - looks like a drill bit, but is made for cutting on the side instead of drilling holes - like for the rotary cutters used to cut electrical box holes in drywall...


This is the combination I have been using.

I think after about a dozen holes, I am close to getting the hang of using it. ( I only use it once or twice a year, and only for for this purpose.)

Paul

trainboyh16-44
22nd Dec 2011, 12:34 AM
I've been having a lot more success with my jigsaw (sabre saw) than I expected..it's like a hot knife through butter with the right blade. Needs a fair bit of sanding afterward, but if your contours aren't sharp, then you can get a pretty good result.

TwinDad
22nd Dec 2011, 12:42 AM
I thought about the jig saw but I wanted to cut in place and was concerned about the blade jamming in the foam behind the fascia - I plan to cut just above and almost flush with the top of the foam, but my jigsaw is rather heavy and might slip.

I suppose I could take the fascia down and cut it in the garage, then put it back up...

Michael Whiteman
22nd Dec 2011, 01:21 AM
I like the Dremel idea also. Have one to the kids hold the vacuum hose for you. Besides,I would think a jig saw would vibrate too much. A little scary on a finished layout. Another good tool would be a router with a formica counter trimmer.

ThirdCoastRail
22nd Dec 2011, 02:05 AM
Well my original plan was to buy a router and use a flush cutting bit (the kind with the ball bearing on the end to follow along contours), but since I hadn't attached my fascia yet I just used a sabre saw to cut it then mounted it. The problem with Dremels and zip cutters is that I couldn't find any bits with the bearing on the end to guide it...otherwise you'd need to go very slow and have a steady hand, which is kinda hard when you're cutting through stuff sideways with a power tool.

MarkFF
22nd Dec 2011, 08:54 AM
You could put masking/painters tape on both sides which would help in a smoother cut. If you use a jigsaw, use a metal blade, not the wood blade for a finer cut. Taking it off the layout to cut it sounds like a good idea :) Good luck!

epumph
22nd Dec 2011, 11:10 AM
late to the party - I would take it off the layout and cut to or just outside of a line. sand to the line and put back. I think a router or some facsimile would have a difficult time with the bearing and the foam - I don't think the bearing will ride on the foam but rather just plow into it. With my shaky hands I would not cut it in place. fwiw

MooseID
22nd Dec 2011, 12:26 PM
The rotary tool or the Dremel would be my choice.

But you have to be careful with the side cutting bits.

Specially when cutting hard materials such as masonite, they have a tendence to snap off if you try to push them too fast. They also heat up very fast.


I would take the facia off the layout to cut it.

Use a felt marker to draw the contours you want while it is still in place, then take it off and cut it.

If you use the same screw holes to put it back it will line up nicely.


No matter which method you use, there will be a mess to clean up, as well as some repair work and adjustments to the foam contour to make it even to the facia.

TwinDad
22nd Dec 2011, 01:31 PM
Thanks guys. I'm now leaning heavily toward removing the fascia for cutting with my jigsaw. I didn't really want to, because I've already caulked the seam between the board and the foam... but frankly that could use some work as well, so I might as well go ahead and do it this way.

trainboyh16-44
22nd Dec 2011, 02:47 PM
Well my original plan was to buy a router and use a flush cutting bit (the kind with the ball bearing on the end to follow along contours), but since I hadn't attached my fascia yet I just used a sabre saw to cut it then mounted it. The problem with Dremels and zip cutters is that I couldn't find any bits with the bearing on the end to guide it...otherwise you'd need to go very slow and have a steady hand, which is kinda hard when you're cutting through stuff sideways with a power tool.
Interesting...I would mount it, use a pencil to trace the profile on, then unmount it and cut it. Less danger of unintended consequences that way.

PennsyPride
22nd Dec 2011, 03:35 PM
If you end up having to cut it in place these tools allow you fine control and a pretty smooth cut.
Dremel Multi-Max Oscillating
http://www.homedepot.com/buy/tools-hardware-power-tools-oscillating-multi-tools/dremel-multi-max-120-volt-oscillating-kit-170745.html

Samarian
24th Dec 2011, 12:14 AM
I use my Jig saw while its on the layout. I mask both sides and use a finest metal blade I can get. Yes it leaves me some work after but with a good file its not a problem and I can get it perfect.

ChicagoNW
24th Dec 2011, 09:22 AM
If I was going to do fascia boards I'd do rough cutting with the roto tool bit (actually just a drill bit) and do finishing and final adjustments, with the drum sander for the Dremel.

SP9mm
30th Dec 2011, 08:04 PM
A lot of good advice here. From my own experience, the best way to get a nice, precise cut is to use a jigsaw with a Vermont American blade #30015. If you can use a guide clamped in place, that will help, or use tape as suggested earlier. A 220 grit sand paper will remove any blemishes after the cut.

TwinDad, if you have not started yet, I have a brand new blade that I can send you. If the mail system here won't work for my address yet, you can contact me through the store.

Good luck!