PDA

View Full Version : Spray Booth "on the cheap"



musicman
22nd Mar 2012, 08:16 PM
I am trying to get set up to spray paint and quite frankly I am not going to spend a penny more on this than I have to. Painting could be a whole other hobby all by itself for all the equipment you need to do it. Anyway ...

My spray booth started as a cardboard box. I tried for a long time and was unable to get a box the same size as an air filter - which would have been ideal - but it is close enough.

I cut the flaps off the box and sealed the bottom - which will become the back.

27510 27511

Then, one stick at a time, I built in the front frame and the double frame that holds the filter. I also glued in a piece to mount a cheap bathroom fan.

27512 27513 27514 27515

As you can see the filter is not a perfect fit but I can build a piece at the top to make it more airtight. I was going to put a light in the booth but I think I will just use the gooseneck lamp/magnifier for light - as you can see in the second-last photo.

The set-up is fairly simple. There will be a switch to control the fan in the upper left corner. I have a piece of flex vent hose to couple the box to my window. The airbrushes will hang on holders attached to the right side front frame.

When the booth is not in use, the hose and various other pieces will stow inside the box and the box can be tucked away in my storage closet.

magi46
22nd Mar 2012, 08:48 PM
Trial and error. Thanks

B&O CT
22nd Mar 2012, 08:49 PM
MM, Thanks for the photo tutorial for this Spray booth.
I need to make one for times when it's too cold to spray in my garage.

coffeeman
22nd Mar 2012, 10:49 PM
neat improvisation, and on a complete side note nice looking guitar in the background

now back on topic, I'm sure you've read some of the safety issues about the fans, especially the bathroom ones? just as a caution as previously there's been warnings over chances of sparks and explosions.

Michael Whiteman
23rd Mar 2012, 12:57 AM
I like your idea with the framing around the opening in the box there Dave. I've built a few of these throw away booths also. If you are going to blow the overspray out the window why do you need a filter? Usually in paint booths, the filter is for the incoming air. The filter will reduce the ability of the fan to move the air. There is something to consider about the size of the fan and how fast the overspray is evacuated from the box, but this usually boils down to total experimentation. It looks like your fan is a brushless model. Not a good idea to have an armature with a brush & comutator assy. because paint will get all over it, unless the sparks ignite your laquer base paint fumes first. I like to use old computer fans for this. Getting enough light in the box to see what you're doin' will be your biggest issue. I think a spot over your shoulder might be the easiest. You just don't want to have the light bulb anywhere that it might get bumped and broken by your air brush. Glass in the paint or an explosion at this point will surely ruin your day. I once put a light inside the box but first I mounted a plastic recepticle in the lid of a pickle jar. After screwing in the bulb, I screwed the pickle jar over the light bulb assembly. Figured I wouldn't likely break this. Make sure the dryer hose extends through the window far enough that the wind doesn't blow the overspray back on your house. For those of you that do this in your garage, an actural thru-the -wall dryer vent could be a permenent installation. Hope some of my experiences are useful Dave. I think you will really enjoy airbrush painting once you get into it.

pbender
23rd Mar 2012, 04:02 AM
Then, one stick at a time, I built in the front frame and the double frame that holds the filter. I also glued in a piece to mount a cheap bathroom fan.


That cheap bathroom fan is a fire hazard in this application.

One of the reasons that a proper spray booth is so expensive is that the fans used either keep the motor outside of the airflow altogether or the motor is sealed to prevent contaminants ( I.e paint ) away from potential ignition sources ( brushed motors will spark at the brushes....)

Paul

ejholden
23rd Mar 2012, 06:29 AM
I stripped the fans out of an old FRED and mounted them on the back of the frame in the corners at the bottom ... Powered by a 5v wall wart.

Filters are old scourer pads from the kitchen.

2 of the new 12v 16 LED down globes mounted in the top provide the light ..... Courtesy of "We Honest" .... another wall wart.

As I tend to spray downwards, the overspray gets sucked straight out the back.

Dearest bit was an alloy crafters turntable ....


http://www.nscale.net/forums/mysmiliesvb/mysmilie_10.gif

Jazzbass01
23rd Mar 2012, 10:04 AM
The filters are there to catch the paint spray. And I suspect Dave will be using acrylic paint, so I'm not sure what fire hazard that would make..

AAM197
23rd Mar 2012, 10:28 AM
The filters are there to catch the paint spray. And I suspect Dave will be using acrylic paint, so I'm not sure what fire hazard that would make..

The filter does not catch the fumes and since this thread resembles an, How Too, others maby be using enamels. A brushless fan motor would be the way to go. Someone, a beginner in the hobby, might decide to build one himself and not no of the hazards. Lets be safe!

Stogie
23rd Mar 2012, 11:05 AM
For some reason my post did not stick from last night. I also have concern over the fan, and even acrylics have a propellant that may be flammable. Also, you need to have a complete seal between the filter and box, otherwise fumes will pass around the filter and adhere to the fan or blow outside. I will check to see if I have anything here that would be a better blower, but I doubt it.

pbender
23rd Mar 2012, 12:00 PM
The filter does not catch the fumes and since this thread resembles an, How Too, others maby be using enamels. A brushless fan motor would be the way to go. Someone, a beginner in the hobby, might decide to build one himself and not no of the hazards. Lets be safe!

A squirl cage fan is also a good idea, because the motor is completly out of the airflow. If the booth is doing its job, the motor of a squirl cage fan will never come into contact with the fumes from the paint.

Paul

AAM197
23rd Mar 2012, 12:56 PM
A squirl cage fan is also a good idea, because the motor is completly out of the airflow. If the booth is doing its job, the motor of a squirl cage fan will never come into contact with the fumes from the paint.

Paul

Never seen a squirrel cage fan. Interesting because I would like to build me a booth also. Ok, just Googled it. Cool!

musicman
23rd Mar 2012, 10:26 PM
Thanks guys! And thanks for posting your concerns as well.

I am not going to be spraying anything other than acrylics.

The filter will pick up much of the paint overspray before it exits the box. The hose attaches to another filter on the window end before blowing out the window.

This is a condo and I can not take any chances with paint overspray actually making it as far as the window screen and the brick window trim outside. I tried it today with red paint and it worked great. The overspray was all stopped by the large filter.

A few more photos:

27573 27574 27575 27576

I added a light and as you can see in the last photo (looking upwtad inside the top) the fan is controlled by a dimmer.


I tried it later in the afternoon and it works great.

musicman
23rd Mar 2012, 10:31 PM
Two things I should add to this thread:

WARNING: This spray booth was built with the intention of spraying ACRYLICS ONLY! If you intend to use such a booth for anything other than acrylics please buy an explosion-proof fan.

NOTE: "On the cheap" will apply differently to various people. I happened to have a pile of assorted scrap wood and assorted electrical items on hand. If you had to buy the wood, or even have the wood cut for you, and had to buy the electrical supplies, you might really want to buy a real spray booth. This idea may not save you any money depending on those considerations.

Thanks!

seanm
24th Mar 2012, 01:30 AM
I know people are concerned about explosions and these fans, but from personal experience it would be very uncommon. even if it does ignite it will not explode. You might have a flash of burning gas out the vent pipe, but that is about it. The flames would be pulled out the pipe. I actually worked with 4 booths used for spray dye and rubber cement using bathroom fans for about 18 years. Never a hint of a flare up. An explosive mix is quite difficult to achieve if the mixture is even slightly off and the flash would not explode because it is not contained. Watch some Mythbusters episodes. The reason bilge blowers need to be sparkles is because when they first start, there may be an explosive mix and the bilge is a closed chamber that could actually explode... not so with a spray booth.

All that being said, I am not recommending any one use something that the do not feel is safe. For me and the amounts of spraying I do, a bathroom fan will be good enough even with some volatile paints from time to time.

ChicagoNW
24th Mar 2012, 01:33 AM
Kitchen vent fans are much safer as they are designed to be used with flamable gasses. Besides if you befriend a contractor you can probably get them free.

Michael Whiteman
24th Mar 2012, 02:23 AM
The second set of pictures you posted show your booth a lot better. I'm glad it works just the way you want Dave. I tend to agree with Sean M's comments above.
When you throw a subject like this out there, you're gonna get about a dozen opinions on how to do it better. I think most of us offer information so that modelers of all experience levels can benefit, and they are not necessarily directed at you Dave. I'm excited to know how fast your fear of airbrushing goes away. Have fun with it.

magi46
24th Mar 2012, 02:36 AM
Good to see the complete booth, I will give building a shot. Thanks again.

coffeeman
24th Mar 2012, 09:05 AM
If in the market for bathroom or kitchen fans, try a habitat for humanity restore. Lots of used building/reno supplies.

musicman
24th Mar 2012, 11:32 AM
The other consideration here is that when I spray acrylic I am trying to merely contain the over spray. It is not about venting fumes.

Seanm makes some very good points.

Anyway, I hope today to get the compressor set up and arrange the water filter/regulator and generally sort out the tool part of the project. I did try the booth briefly with a can of compressed air but that is not the way I will usually run it.

Hopefully more pics tonight or tomorrow.

pbender
25th Mar 2012, 02:19 PM
I know people are concerned about explosions and these fans, but from personal experience it would be very uncommon. even if it does ignite it will not explode. You might have a flash of burning gas out the vent pipe, but that is about it. The flames would be pulled out the pipe.

I personally worry about flame more than explosion here.... That flame can start a house fireby catching flammable materials near the booth or its outlet pipe on fire... Our house are full of flammable things, so it is a real concern.

Paul

seanm
25th Mar 2012, 02:34 PM
About fire... If the fumes were to ignite, it would be a flash fire and unless you have something like dry leaves or something extremely easy to light near it, the chances of an actual structure fire are not likely. This is not a flame thrower, it is more like when the stove does not light real fast and the gas lights with a woosh and then immediately goes out.

I do think Paul, that if you or anyone reading this is worried about this, you/they should use something that is sparkless. I am not, but respect your opinion and concerns. I have tested this for over 18 years and am comfortable. YMMV.

musicman
25th Mar 2012, 04:27 PM
Again, spraying acrylics only, this is more about controlling overspray than venting fumes. The odor (fumes) from acrylic paint are in no way flammable or inflammable.

hraka
27th Mar 2012, 07:37 AM
I'd like to se some photos or videos of the item in use when and if you have the time somtime. Thanks!!

musicman
27th Mar 2012, 08:30 AM
I can't do video but as soon as I have this up and running I will get the CFO to take some pics of me using it.I just have to wait for the rest of the air fittings. Probably next week.

musicman
27th Mar 2012, 07:07 PM
I tried the booth this evening with the air brush connected directly to the compressor. I works great! I did two coats on the tow truck assembly.

27782 27783 27784

I did the first coat on the tow truck and a coat on two junk cars without the fan turned on. I asked Ruth to come in and she said she could not smell paint. Nice!

27785

I did a second coat with an old threadbare sock over the fan outlet. No overspray made it that far.

27786

I am very happy with this and I am thinking that for most of what I will be doing, a simple cardboard box probably would have done the job. Well, anyway, it works. I think before I spray anything like a loco or something larger I will definitely hook up the water filter/regulator.

In any case, I am considering this one a done deal.

Oh, and a bonus photo (completely off topic) for the guys who might be interested:

27787

Okay. I'll behave now. ;)

Bryan
27th Mar 2012, 07:10 PM
Oh, and a bonus photo (completely off topic)
I don't see any over spray on it, so it proves the filter is effective, and makes its inclusion on-topic ;)

Jazzbass01
27th Mar 2012, 08:28 PM
Sweet looking acoustic Dave, but not a headstock that I recognize. I'll bet there's a story there..

News Flash!! MM actually used his airbrush!!! BRAVO!!!!

code40
27th Mar 2012, 08:53 PM
I assume the photo of the guitar is there because now that you've got some airbrush experience, this is your next project (http://carmodif2011.blogspot.ca/2011/01/sharpie-guitar-classic-airbrush-design.html) :)

TwinDad
27th Mar 2012, 09:46 PM
Bravo, MM! Glad to see you finally getting some use out of that airbrush.

I trust you did clean it thoroughly afterward... :D

Oh, and very nice guitar! I'd like to know about that headstock, too...

musicman
28th Mar 2012, 10:11 AM
code40 ... I don't think so. :)

Airbrush ... I started by using the Badger airbrush because I would not want to ruin a better one. Some day soon I am going to try out the one I got from TD. It is a dual action brush so there will again be a learning curve.

Guitar ... that is a Blueridge "Gospel Special". Nice guitar!

hraka
28th Mar 2012, 01:20 PM
Thanks MM!!!!!!!

coffeeman
28th Mar 2012, 01:37 PM
That is a nice looking guitar.

Are you venting outside or is that really a black sock attached to the fan?

I like the pink foam idea. If I may offer, maybe try the dollar store for a "lazy susan". Its great for keeping the mitts off something while painting yet the ease of turning it to spray all sides.

musicman
28th Mar 2012, 06:27 PM
I have a small turntable to use when the situation requires one.

Yes, that is a black sock! :) I wanted to see if any of the yellow overspray was actually getting that far and it was not. I feel comfortable with running it out the window when spraying something bigger. I will have another filter on the window end of the hose as well.

And, with such a small amount of paint being sprayed there was really no odor to worry about - acrylic anyway, so no big deal.

nmanic
29th Mar 2012, 07:09 AM
Sort of have been following the thread and yes safty is golden BUT and yes this is still on topic how many people use this when airbrushing ????????? Oh by the way Gotta love your booth !!!

http://i6.photobucket.com/albums/y239/nmaniac/USAF BMT/DSCN0134.jpg

TwinDad
29th Mar 2012, 07:14 AM
< raises hand >

http://farm8.staticflickr.com/7103/6873346266_3710495bf8_n.jpg (http://www.flickr.com/photos/bgtwindad/6873346266/)

... just bought this, actually.

nmanic
29th Mar 2012, 08:14 AM
< raises hand >

http://farm8.staticflickr.com/7103/6873346266_3710495bf8_n.jpg (http://www.flickr.com/photos/bgtwindad/6873346266/)

... just bought this, actually.

See,Great minds do think alike !

L

turbobuick6
1st Apr 2012, 10:22 AM
That sure looks a whole lot better then my first card board spray booth setup! When I got real serious about painting, I used 2 plastic tots cut apart and made a downdraft booth with a marine bilge pump fan to pull out the fumes, with this setup I was still able to spray enamels and such, I used that booth for over 3 years, the neatest part was after the fan I used a 5 gallon bucket with a bunch of furnace filters and charcoal filters in the bucket attached with 3" hose and was able to spray with out venting outside, as the filter bucket would catch anything coming from the booth fumes and all. But now with all these acrylic paints theres not much need to trap the fumes as they barely smell anymore.

But word to the wise with that fan setup I would not not use alcohol to thin the paint, only water as it is possible for the alcohol to combust.