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View Full Version : 3D is getting closer.



Lake
2nd Feb 2014, 05:46 PM
The future of 3D printing for our hobby is getting much closer. Seems every few months, a new level of sophistication in the printers, comes out.
http://www.bbc.co.uk/news/technology-25878078
:D

epumph
2nd Feb 2014, 06:00 PM
hmmm... will you need special glasses to see the layout? >:-}

Tred
2nd Feb 2014, 06:22 PM
This whole idea just excites me. I think this is the neatest thing since sliced bread! It's still a little costly, but that's slowly coming down. Imagine, when we can have these in most homes? The possibilities are endless!

spiralcity
2nd Feb 2014, 06:24 PM
What I want to see is how it handles micro parts.

Tony35
2nd Feb 2014, 06:26 PM
yes this technology is coming along
just a bit to pricey yet for me :surprised:


It will cost about $330,000 (200,000).

hope someday the prices come down and i can have one to 3D print my own stuff

baronjutter
2nd Feb 2014, 06:29 PM
I've got a fairly top of the line 3d printer that sits behind me when I'm laser cutting and I've yet to really have a use for it. The level of detail just isn't quite there for our hobby yet, but I'm sure it will be sooner than we think. I think once we can get at least the level of shapeways FUD material in our homes, that will be a game-changer.

But I also have a feeling only the richest of us will have these in our homes. There's a growing number of "makerspace" workshops sprouting up all over to give people access to these machines individuals can't quite afford but a small group can.

POMPERAUGRR
3rd Feb 2014, 10:53 AM
This whole idea just excites me. I think this is the neatest thing since sliced bread! It's still a little costly, but that's slowly coming down. Imagine, when we can have these in most homes? The possibilities are endless!

I have often wondered...what was the greatest thing before sliced bread? ;)

Eric

Jugtown Modeler
3rd Feb 2014, 12:08 PM
I have often wondered...what was the greatest thing before sliced bread? ;)

Eric ..... (unsliced) bread! beer! sex!... not necessarily in that order...

WP&P
3rd Feb 2014, 06:38 PM
Didn't steam trains come about prior to sliced bread? Wasn't there a time when the saying was "the greatest thing since iron rails"? Or is that just wishful thinking on my part?

baronjutter
3rd Feb 2014, 06:38 PM
I'm still pretty pumped about the wheel my self.

Stogie
3rd Feb 2014, 08:51 PM
Still pretty pumped about a good woman. Wow! She has been with me for 14 yrs now!

Back to 3D printers, yeah Objets are pretty sweet printers, but they have a bit to go until they can print something as detailed as an N Scale figure at a reasonable cost. On the other end of the spectrum, I received a sample from a MakerBot. The MakerBot and Reprap are the consumer level printers most of you may have heard about. When I talked to the rep, I stated that it was the worst piece of garbage I ever laid eyes on. While he agreed with me, I should not that the technology MB and RR use is about the same level Stratasys and 3D Systems were at about ten years ago. So maybe in the next decade we will see consumer grade printers that can get the resolution and detail of current today's industrial printers. They use a technology called FDM. This technology has been surpassed by SLS then SLA technology. Many of the Objet printers put SLAs to shame, and an SLA is capable of a fair amount of detail.

baronjutter
3rd Feb 2014, 08:56 PM
I'm going to take the 3d printer class at my makerspace soon and I'll post some things I make. I was thinking of using it to make some window frames. If I'm doing them more or less flat and building up the layers that way it shouldn't be toooo much of a problem.

code40
8th Feb 2014, 09:47 PM
I would have expected you to use your 3D printer to make some cornice details - something you probably can't do with a laser cutter:

55093

DrMb
11th Feb 2014, 02:36 AM
I think this is the neatest thing since sliced bread!
And if you think what we've seen so far is neat, they are working on 3D printers that can print sliced bread.

dean_s
12th Feb 2014, 09:59 AM
My brother teaches at the local vo-tech school. They are getting a $40k full-color machine. They don't plan on letting students use it for a year so in the mean time the teachers are going to "learn how to use it." I think for HO and larger you can get really creative with what a moderately priced machine can do. I do agree that for N scale the level of finite detail just isn't there... yet.

kalbert
12th Feb 2014, 11:38 AM
Simple shape things (like Horst air filters ;) work well in N. I would think things like cornice molding for buildings, possibly even windows and doors, could be done also. There used to be a cottage industry built around making add on components for DPM buildings, awnings, interiors, alternate roof lines, roof and utility details, etc. This is an area that could really get moving again with 3D printing. The parts themselves are used directly, not so much "rapid prototype" for testing or as masters for casting. Highly detailed pieces like whole locomotive shells or pieces that need to be rugged like trucks aren't quite there yet, I know there are some available, and all things considered they are nice and are filling voids for people, but the level of detail on them is not as good as what can be achieved with injection molding or casting. Recall that brass is all but obsolete with the advancement in the level of detail possible now on injection molded parts. I would imagine that in time 3D printing will take the crown from injection molding too, but we shall see...

Chessack
12th Feb 2014, 01:28 PM
One of my collaborators at work has 2 different 3D printers. The level of detail they can achieve even now is simply amazing. In a few years? It will be incredible.