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Dennis.1960
6th Sep 2016, 05:31 PM
Hi all, I'm modeling a circa 1920's railroad and was looking for a period authentic yard switcher. I originally wanted to run a slope tender USRA 0-6-0 but can't find any DCC equipped. I also looked on the Zephyr Digitrax website and couldn't find any DCC encoders to fit an 0-6-0. Are there other electric or diesel options that would stay true to my 1920's theme but are more readily available DCC equipped? Any other options?

Thanks!

Spookshow
6th Sep 2016, 06:10 PM
If you can find one, a Life-Like 0-8-0 would be a good option. Comes with an 8-pin NMRA DCC socket in the tender.

-Mark

P-LineSoo
6th Sep 2016, 07:45 PM
We were lamenting in the Prairie thread about the lack of smaller mainline steamers in N. I think there's a Bachmann Spectrum 2-6-0 that might be DCC equipped...you could always yank the 2...

ranulf
6th Sep 2016, 08:03 PM
If you're not set on an 0-X-0 wheel arrangement, Bachman's 2-6-0 might work for you. It has a step pilot like switchers used and comes DCC equipped.

ChicagoNW
7th Sep 2016, 12:35 AM
Many of the larger cities were beginning to outlaw the soot spewing teakettles at this time. To combat this the first box cab diesels were being introduced. Some of them lasted to the end of the 50s. In many ways they are identical to the all electric boxcabs of the day.

The most common one was the ALGEIR. It was a cooperative effort between Alco (body and chassis) General Electric (electrical and control) and Ingersol-Rand (Diesel engine). There is one guy in Europe who will build one, for a large fee.

But they make a great first kitbash. The body starts life as a caboose. Then you add either a Kato or BanDai 8-wheel B-Train Shorty chassis. If using the BanDai, TomyTec offers correct sideframes. Or you can use a switcher chassis. To the roof you add a radiator made from ribbon cable and other details. The B-Train Shorty chassis don't come with DCC but they are so simple it is easy to add. There are several build threads on this forum.

pbender
7th Sep 2016, 07:48 AM
Many of the larger cities were beginning to outlaw the soot spewing teakettles at this time. To combat this the first box cab diesels were being introduced. Some of them lasted to the end of the 50s. In many ways they are identical to the all electric boxcabs of the day.


Source please? Also, which "larger cities"?

I know trains in and out of New York City may have been electric by this time, but that had as much to do with the tunnels used to approach the city as anything else.

Paul

Dennis.1960
7th Sep 2016, 03:04 PM
I decided to widen my timeframe a bit and went with a cool little Bachmann GE-70 Diesel (call it my creamsicle switcher...it'll look great with my Arkham & Miskatonic logo :-) According to wiki the first one began running in 1942 which is close enough for me ;)

83585

ChicagoNW
7th Sep 2016, 07:02 PM
Chicago passed the Lakefront Ordinance of 1919. It required electrification by 1936 to control the smoke and soot produced by locomotives. The introduction of diesels lowered pollution significantly. Only the Illinois Central commuter lines completely changed their equipment.

My source, The Iron Horse and the Windy City. How the Railroads Shaped Chicago.

If the two most important railroad cities passed smoke and soot controls it is only logical that other places would too.

pbender
7th Sep 2016, 08:27 PM
If the two most important railroad cities passed smoke and soot controls it is only logical that other places would too.

The two most important, you mean St. Louis and Kansas City?

Neither St. Louis or Kansas City ever passed any smoke ordnances I am aware of. I think the same can be said about the other major cities the Frisco
served as well (Memphis,Tulsa,OKC,Dallas/Ft Worth,Birmingham). I won't go out on a limb and claim further than that.

Paul

P-LineSoo
9th Sep 2016, 07:14 AM
I decided to widen my timeframe a bit and went with a cool little Bachmann GE-70 Diesel (call it my creamsicle switcher...it'll look great with my Arkham & Miskatonic logo :-) According to wiki the first one began running in 1942 which is close enough for me ;)


I think you'll be glad that you did. Because of first the depression, then the war effort, not a great deal changed between the 20's and the end of the war, other than some diesels starting to show up. First, there was a glut of idle equipment, then a shortage of everything. Anything on trucks went into service.

The prototype line that I aspire to model someday ripped it's tracks up in late 1945, however I've already decided to move that out about 10 years so that I can run some fun diesels in addition to steam.

Dennis.1960
9th Sep 2016, 11:04 AM
I think you'll be glad that you did. Because of first the depression, then the war effort, not a great deal changed between the 20's and the end of the war, other than some diesels starting to show up. First, there was a glut of idle equipment, then a shortage of everything. Anything on trucks went into service.


Thanks! I'm really excited that I'll be running a 2-6-0 and 4-6-2 for my freight lines, a trolley for my passenger subway, and this GE 70 ton diesel for my yard...I'll have a little bit of everything ;)

randgust
12th Sep 2016, 02:18 PM
The GE 70-tonner and 44-tonner were designed for specific railroad circumstances.

The 44-tonner was specifically designed to be eligible for the one-man union crew laws of the time, that allowed a single engineer to operate a locomotive without a fireman. There were actually popular with the big railroads and many class 1's at least had a few of them for specific situations.

The 70-tonner was designed to be the biggest road diesel for lightweight shortlines that wasn't heavier that the cars it pulled - remember a typical GP7 weighs in at around 125 tons or so. A 70-tonner could run on ex-trolley lines, ex-logging lines, shortlines, and the like. If you look at the original production sales, they went to little backwoods shortlines, etc., any railroad with light rail. Not really switchers in bigger yards, and all post-WW2.

The EMD SW1 started out in 1938, actually older than the GE 70-tonner by quite a bit. They were a true yard switcher. SW1 is DCC ready by Hornby. The Kato NW2 is a year newer starting in 1939, also a true yard switcher. They were surprisingly heavy, which a true yard switcher is by definition. The Atlas Baldwin VO-1000 is the same era (1938-and prewar), and the Atlas S2 is 1940.

If you go back into the 1920's, the GE boxcabs were still in the experimental stages, only a handful out there (less than 20), interesting enough but not really widespread at all.

For steam, if you really want a first-class steam switcher for everyday use in a yard and DCC, you need two things - a gearhead motor (possible tender drive) for really slow, smooth speed, and a tender with eight-wheel end-axle pickups. That's in the custom-build arena although some are close.

I've been experimenting for years with a rebuild of an Atlas 2-6-0 chassis into a ridiculously heavy 0-6-4 saddletank (using the trailing truck for pickup) and I'm still not happy with it although it does work. Until I can figure out the gearhead, it's still not worth the fight.

mosslake
15th Sep 2016, 09:22 PM
If you have the time and money, this would suit your needs...

https://www.shapeways.com/product/XULG8X9JW/n-scale-cnj-1000?optionId=56919182&li=user-wishlist

randgust
16th Sep 2016, 09:54 AM
Yeah, and put a gearhead motor in that one and you've got a winner. Those have one powered truck with a traction tire. The stock Bandai/Kato B-train chassis are well enough designed but are relatively speedy but you can put a Gizmoszone 5.14:1 gearhead on the 12v motor and it works great as a slower-speed drive, pretty much the same speed ratio as an Atlas slow-speed motor.

As long as you pile the weight over the powered truck, it will pull surprisingly well.

mosslake
18th Sep 2016, 08:29 AM
put a Gizmoszone 5.14:1 gearhead on the 12v motor and it works great as a slower-speed drive, pretty much the same speed ratio as an Atlas slow-speed motor.

Are the motors 12v? I always thought they were a lower voltage motor, that's why they ran so fast. I agree with the gearhead, tames them pretty good

westfalen
19th Sep 2016, 09:23 PM
For what it's worth the Bachmann USRA 0-6-0 should have the tender that comes with the 2-6-2 to be prototypical as the USRA 0-6-0's didn't have slope back tenders. The tender Bachmann uses on the 0-6-0 is from their PRR 0-4-0.

randgust
21st Sep 2016, 04:48 PM
The Kato B-train (11-105, 106, 107) chassis were originally released with a 3.5v. motor and a 100-ohm resistor in series on the little circuit board. That was back in 2005-6. The second run of the chassis took the exact same motor case and made it a 12v motor with no resistor, just the original circuit board with nothing now mounted on it. I haven't seen one of the original chassis now for years, out of the 60-70 that I've bought for custom builds only the first two were 3.5v.

The motors themselves are indistinguishable. I have to write 3.5V or 12V on them when I get them as I can't tell them apart.

This case design has become pretty common. It's got two screw holes on the metal end, and can fit the Gizmoszone gearheads that still come with a 3.5v. motor. You may have to shorten the shaft and grind it to a 'D" profile to fit the pinion gear on the gearhead, but that's pretty easy to do with a Dremel abrasive disk.

Bachmann uses a dual-shaft design with the same size case in the 44 and 70-tonner. Tomytec now uses the same case dimensions - just elongated longer on the metal armature portion - in their chassis. Atlas used a longer single-shaft in the 4-4-0, and the new Shay has a longer, dual shaft motor. It's a pretty handy thing to know, actually, that you can get a cheap gearhead on the end of those standard case designs.

The strange part is that I have yet to wreck one of those little guys or wear one out. I had the other bigger Tomytec motor (the same motor that I was told was in the Bachmann 2-6-6-2) go bad on about 20% of them (finger brushes wore out), which started the gearhead experimentation to begin with. But the Kato-style motor that first showed up on the B-train has been a really solid design.

mosslake
26th Sep 2016, 08:21 AM
Interesting technical stuff on those motors, thanks.