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Thread: Micro-Trains N scale converted wood-chip gondola

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    Default Maybe some kind of brown or

    Maybe some kind of brown or orange wash to give it some dark highlights?
    Charles

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    Default SP Wood Gons

    SP did convert a lot of drop bottom Gons into wood chip and/or beet cars. The MT model is probably an early example, but I cant find a photo or date for the car. Check out this page for weathering info on similar (later) car.http://www.railgoat.railfan.net/spcars/byclass/gon/index.htm
    I Never Met A Train I Did Not Like

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    Default More info

    The car listed on the site above as a "G50-23" - a 50 Ton Converted Gon. is similar to the MT model. The weathering in the photo is typical for a car in service
    I Never Met A Train I Did Not Like

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    Default I filled my woodchip cars

    I filled my woodchip cars with woodchips........I cut a piece of soft spongy foam slightly larger than the opening in the car and taper the top side so it looks mounded up...it doesn't have to be pretty, just roughly correct. Then I coat the top with clear silicone and dip it in very fine sawdust and let it dry. Once dry you have a very flexible load that easily be pushed into the car or popped out again. Because it's slightly oversize, the foam holds itself in place in the car...... the foam doesn't have to fill the car, so you can use a fairly thin layer and adjust the load deep or shallow in the car to simulate different load levels. I've also done it for coal loads using coal I bought on-line. I've gotten a lot of compliments on the loads looking "real". There was an article in either NS or NSR a few months ago that was similar, but the author used paint to stick the material to the foam. Once you get the size/shape figured out, it only takes about 5 or 6 minutes per load, and you get the advantage that each load is unique, since you never get the top mound cut exactly the same. I'm not sure where to tell you to get the sawdust........I've saved some when I'm cutting for my layout, but most of mine came from work. Our woodshop sucks up all the sawdust from the table saws into big collectors. I just take home a zip-loc bag whenever I need to and sift it, although even coarse sawdust looks better than the plastic loads.

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    Default Micro-Trains N scale converted wood-chip gondola

    Trainster FWIW: I use ordinary wood sawdust (MDF dust will do at a pinch). This comes in a variety of grades, so you can choose what you want - the grade that most closely replicates the actual load. If there are too many 'bits' in the 'dust, and they are too large, you can sieve them to get the size you want. (NB: Don't use the very fine MDF 'dust - it looks and acts like flour - very un prototypical). Carefully cover the existing plastic load with a PVA using a wide brush (size No.10?). Dust the PVA with sawdust and leave to dry. Invert the wagon and shake - any 'dust that is not glued-down will of course fall off. Repeat the process until you are happy with the result. I've used this for my own wood-chip loads, and find that it works well, though you might want to experiment first - 'just in case'. Hope this helps. Komata "TVR - serving the Northern Taranaki . . . "
    Komata "TVR - serving the Northern Taranaki . . . "

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    Default Quick hopper and gon loads

    Hi all, the article referred to above is in Jul/Aug 08 of N Scale Railroading page 51Gene
    Yours,

    Gene

    Turtle Creek Industrial RR

    Link to my Flickr account: https://www.flickr.com/photos/epumph/

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    Default Most loads can be helped a

    Most loads can be helped a lot by an india ink and alcohol wash. Simple, fast, cheap and effective. I have had good luck on MT loads with it.
    Best,
    Tony

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