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Thread: Share Your Weathering!

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    Here's one I've been messing with on and off for a while. I probably should have faded the lettering and probably went overboard with the black at the bottom, but I'd really like any feedback on the roof. It's a mix of a couple of colors of weathering powder and an acrylic wash, but that looked like too much so I took a damp Q-tip and rubbed some of it back off. Boxcars with galvanized roofs seem a little easier to me, I'm having a harder time with the painted roof.
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    Quote Originally Posted by OTFan View Post
    Here's one I've been messing with on and off for a while. I probably should have faded the lettering and probably went overboard with the black at the bottom, but I'd really like any feedback on the roof. It's a mix of a couple of colors of weathering powder and an acrylic wash, but that looked like too much so I took a damp Q-tip and rubbed some of it back off. Boxcars with galvanized roofs seem a little easier to me, I'm having a harder time with the painted roof.
    I like the roof but maybe add a little peeling paint with some splashes of silver. I thought the black and the sides a fine and look like light weathering to me.
    Mike
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    Quote Originally Posted by fifer View Post
    I like the roof but maybe add a little peeling paint with some splashes of silver.
    How would you go about that? Maybe just touch a few bristles of an almost dry brush to the car to leave a few flecks?

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    Quote Originally Posted by OTFan View Post
    Here's one I've been messing with on and off for a while. I probably should have faded the lettering and probably went overboard with the black at the bottom, but I'd really like any feedback on the roof. It's a mix of a couple of colors of weathering powder and an acrylic wash, but that looked like too much so I took a damp Q-tip and rubbed some of it back off. Boxcars with galvanized roofs seem a little easier to me, I'm having a harder time with the painted roof.
    Overall me thinks it looks pretty good.
    Give me a little time to get some photos gathered up and I'll go over what I've done for decent results.
    The Little Rock Line blog


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    IMG_0448.jpg
    It always helps to have a picture of a real car to copy. I can never really remember what I saw when I sit down to weather. Your car looks fine Cody. The weathering on your roof looks more like dirt that has blown up there than rust, which isn't a bad thing. I try to apply weathering in the same sequence that mother nature does it.

    I really like using oil paint for rust. With dark brown and orange you can mix any shade of rust you need. Stippling it on with a brush will give it realistic texture and if you don't like it, you can wipe it off and start over. Blowing some rust colored weathering powder onto the oil paint will produce an interesting effect also.

    Here's a link to the guys who really know what they're doing. http://theweatheringshop.com/ I only wish I was half this good. Check out their tutorials.

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    Quote Originally Posted by Michael Whiteman View Post
    IMG_0448.jpg
    It always helps to have a picture of a real car to copy. I can never really remember what I saw when I sit down to weather. Your car looks fine Cody. The weathering on your roof looks more like dirt that has blown up there than rust, which isn't a bad thing. I try to apply weathering in the same sequence that mother nature does it.

    I really like using oil paint for rust. With dark brown and orange you can mix any shade of rust you need. Stippling it on with a brush will give it realistic texture and if you don't like it, you can wipe it off and start over. Blowing some rust colored weathering powder onto the oil paint will produce an interesting effect also.

    Here's a link to the guys who really know what they're doing. http://theweatheringshop.com/ I only wish I was half this good. Check out their tutorials.
    Thanks for the link but wow what a hassle to sign up for the forum !!!

    Mike
    “When I was 5 years old, my mother always told me that happiness was the key to life.
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    I wrote ‘happy’.
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    Quote Originally Posted by OTFan View Post
    How would you go about that? Maybe just touch a few bristles of an almost dry brush to the car to leave a few flecks?
    OK,
    Yes you can do that, that is what is known as "dry brushing" Dip your paint brush in some paint lightly, then wipe the majority of it off on a piece of paper, or paper towel or something that you have handy. Leaving enough on the brush, you lightly brush over the surface which will leave small amounts of the color, in this case silver, on the surface, but it will not leave a full brush stroke of paint.

    What I would suggest to do is much along the same line as what Michael has mentioned. If you don't have any, I would suggest to go out and buy a few tubes of Artist oil paint. These are the basic colors that work good for the majority of weathering and rusting:



    Next you can use either weathering powders or even some cheap pastel chalks. Two colors work great, that's Black and Orange. If you mix these to colors you can get different shades of browns.



    The first step in doing this as in any weathering is to spray the surface to weathered with a coat of dull coat. This give the surface tooth so that any weathering material that is applied to the surface will stick,

    After the dull coat dries, the first thing you should do is IMHO, is to fade the paint as described here: http://www.nscale.net/forums/showthr...ing-Brush-Fade



    Once this is done you can apply a coat of Burnt Sienna in the same fashion as you do the white. One nice thing about oil piants is they have a tendency to stain the dull coat and change the color nicely. If you're not after a real rusty roof you can stop here and seal it and call it done.

    Both of these E8's were faded as described above, sealed and then I applied a coat of dark gray to the top unit and coat of Burnt Sienna to the bottom unit. I applied the colors as I applied the white, then took the majority of it off with a "Q"tip. But unlike the White, I left small traces of the brown in and around small details just like dirt and rust would do in real life. You can also use a brown wash for this as well. Anything to knock down the original color.





    How much you leave is up to you.

    The next step is to take a short bristled brush that is stiff. I have taken an old brush and cut off the biggest share of the tip so that only about 1/8" or so is left. This makes a nice stiff stippling brush.

    Start out with the lighter color of paint, Raw Sienna. Dab your brush in the paint to load it up, you don't want a lot just enough to have some on the end. Start out light then more as you feel comfortable. Start by stippling this on the surface in a random pattern over as much of the roof as you wish. Once this layer has been applied, you can go to the next darker color: Burnt Sienna. Repeat the same application as you did with the Raw Sienna, but do not cover the entire area, stay back from the outer edges and work the darker color toward the center. As one guy explains it "The Pain of the Rust is always towards the center and the rust spreads outward like cancer" This is called "Layering" One color over the first. Always start in the center of an areas you wish to cover, working outwards. This give a natural pattern, heavier in the middle and lighter to outer edges. The Pain is the center and therefore the darkest.
    If you are satisfied with amount of rust, then stop and let it dry for a few days. If you don't like the way it looks, you can take a "Q"tip or small rag lightly dampened with mineral spirits and wipe it all off ans start over. Since Oil dries slowly it gives you a chance to start over.

    After the paint has dried, shoot another coat of dull coat over the roof to seal the paint. Now comes the time for the chalks or powders.

    Scrape off some chalk with a razor blade into a shallow pan, some of orange and some of the black. Mix until you get a color you like and then with very soft brush, lightly load up your brush and brush it on the rusted areas. Start light and add more as you feel comfortable with. If you like the results, stop, spray another coat of dull coat and your done. I have seen guys and have tried it myself, that is to apply the paint and then apply the chalks or powders directly into the fresh paint by stippling the chalk in the same method as you did the paint. Then let it all dry and shoot a sealer coat of dull coat to seal the whole thing. Both methods work.

    Oil paints work the best IMHO as it dries slower, more time to work with it. If your quick enough you can do this using acrylics as well.

    Here are a few samples of some of my stuff that I've plated with.
















    These are still no where as good as some of the ones that I've seen before. If you go to the weathering shop through the link that Michael posted, you will see some jaw dropping examples. These are the best that I've done so far, but there is still room for improvement.

    Another tool that some of the guys use is not a brush, but cosmetic sponges that women use to apply makeup. They take one of the edges and tear off little pieces so the surface is no long smooth, but rough and use that to dab or stipple the paint on. For N scale, they can be a little big.

    Grab and old car and experiment, even a piece of paper or styrene will work.
    The Little Rock Line blog


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  12. #648
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    Thanks for the link and picture Michael. The relative lack of pictures of the tops of cars makes that part harder. We tend to see more of the tops of our model cars than of the real thing. Allen, wow, thanks for the tutorial. Your rust with the oil paints looks quite good. I'd bought a set of oil paints from wally world to do the trucks as well as to try your fade technique (although I'd weathered the sides of that car before I read about it, have to wait until next time), now I'll use them for rust also. I think I need another car to practice on now...

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    And that right there is a weathering tutorial! Thanks for sharing the techniques and pictures. I have to try some of the painting techniques as I have only had good results with chalks but never any good results with paints - and I know it was just the way I was doing things.

    That roof rust is very convincing...really nice job Allen!
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    Hey mnods! Can we break off post #647 as an Article?

    In other news, how cool is it that this topic has grabbed 650 posts?

    I need to get off my butt and contribute some more...
    Never mistake a guy who talks a lot for a guy who has something to say...

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    Quote Originally Posted by TwinDad View Post
    Hey mnods! Can we break off post #647 as an Article?
    How does one go about posting an "Article"? If someone can point me in the right direction I'll see if I can get one done up.
    Maybe what I should is to redo this one and take a little more time and show more step by step pics.
    I apologize for the hurried way I ran through it last night. I meant to get back and post this earlier last night but got tied up with eBay and some other chores and before I knew it, it was after 11pm by the time I was halfway through it and I couldn't find some of the pics that I thought I had.

    There is more than one way to skin a cat. I've tried several methods and so far, this one has seemed to work the best for me. For the most part, these turned well, but I did get a little over enthusiastic and got the rust far heavier than what I had pictured in my minds eye, but I just kept going with it. It's probably the hardest thing to do with any weathering is getting it TOO rusted or overly weathered.

    One thing I really wanted to get across is that regardless of what the roof is: painted or galvanized, this method works for either. But I agree with you OTFan, a painted roof seems to be a little more daunting to weather than a galvanized roof.
    The Little Rock Line blog


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    I couldn't wait to try this, so here's my attempt at rusting the roof of that same car. I also used some "yellow ochre" oil paint on the trucks, and then some "dirty rust" weathering powder on top of that. I like the caked on effect on the trucks. I tried to follow Allen's advise above on the roof, except my little wally world pack of oil paints didn't have raw sienna or burnt sienna, so I tried to create similar colors by mixing crimson red and yellow ochre to approximate raw sienna, and then adding in burnt umber to get something like burnt sienna. Not exactly the same colors, maybe a little too red, but close. I'll put the other colors on my hobby shopping list. I also stippled some rust colored weathering powder on top of the paint. I'd like to say there was an artistic reason why I did that while the paint was still wet rather than after it is dried and dulcoted, but it's actually because I'm an impatient SOB sometimes. Anyway, enough yacking, here are the pictures.
    Attached Images Attached Images

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    Quote Originally Posted by OTFan View Post
    I couldn't wait to try this, so here's my attempt at rusting the roof of that same car. I also used some "yellow ochre" oil paint on the trucks, and then some "dirty rust" weathering powder on top of that. I like the caked on effect on the trucks. I tried to follow Allen's advise above on the roof, except my little wally world pack of oil paints didn't have raw sienna or burnt sienna, so I tried to create similar colors by mixing crimson red and yellow ochre to approximate raw sienna, and then adding in burnt umber to get something like burnt sienna. Not exactly the same colors, maybe a little too red, but close. I'll put the other colors on my hobby shopping list. I also stippled some rust colored weathering powder on top of the paint. I'd like to say there was an artistic reason why I did that while the paint was still wet rather than after it is dried and dulcoted, but it's actually because I'm an impatient SOB sometimes. Anyway, enough yacking, here are the pictures.
    Yep , you got it !!!

    Mike
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  24. #654
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    rust comes in lots of colors like almost orange to almost black. Living in a seaport town I get to see the stuff up close and personal.
    I like the way the rust appears to flow from the badly rusted roof down along the door.
    not an expert but I think you killed it.
    Yours,

    Gene

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    I'm no expert either. I judge these weathering jobs by how easily I can suspend disbelief and imagine the car is real. Your roof certainly passes that test. Good job!
    Never mistake a guy who talks a lot for a guy who has something to say...

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    OT,
    I agreed with MW's assessment of your original roof, in that it looked like it had been been subjected to a dusty (looked like sawdust) environment. Which was fine in my eye... but if you were looking for rust, than your update definitely nailed it.
    Looks awesome!

    -Paul

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    Quote Originally Posted by OTFan View Post
    I tried to follow Allen's advise above on the roof, except my little wally world pack of oil paints didn't have raw sienna or burnt sienna, so I tried to create similar colors by mixing crimson red and yellow ochre to approximate raw sienna, and then adding in burnt umber to get something like burnt sienna. Not exactly the same colors, maybe a little too red, but close. I'll put the other colors on my hobby shopping list. I also stippled some rust colored weathering powder on top of the paint. I'd like to say there was an artistic reason why I did that while the paint was still wet rather than after it is dried and dulcoted, but it's actually because I'm an impatient SOB sometimes. Anyway, enough yacking, here are the pictures.
    OTFan, I think you have the idea. Now you just need to keep experimenting with the technique. The more you play, the more things will come to light.

    It's like anything else, you've never been there before so you don't know how things will work out and what the final outcome will be. Once you cross the first fence, you can look back to see where you came from and then you'll have an idea of how you got there. Then you can start experimenting!

    By placing the powders in the wet paint like you did, will give you a little more texture. Nothing wrong with that.
    If you think the colors came out too red or too orange, take some black, brown or orange chalk, scrape off a bit and lightly dust it over the rust spot you created to help change the color a bit or tone it down. Then seal it.

    Remember that rust is not mono-toned like epumph says, the more variations you have the deeper and richer it will look. Keep the darker rust to the center and lighter rust to the outside.
    Last edited by Allen H.; 6th May 2014 at 01:45 PM.
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    Wow...Cody. You got it now, especially with the texture. On you next car, if you want to make it look like the rust has been around a little longer....add some dark brown color to the center of the patch of rust. Experiment with mixing colors. I'm sure your WW set has what you need. Like I said, I only have two, brown and orange.

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    My first attempt at weathering some grain hoppers. I used powders and then applied dullcote. It's not as nice as some of the stuff on here, but, at least for me, is nicer than the shiny plastic look. So two down, 100+ to go.

    IMG_0521-Copy_zps5e6621b3.jpgIMG_0522-Copy_zpsbefe887d.jpg

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    I've been working on this project for a while and had time to finish it yesterday. The crud near the bottom is oil paint with just a bit of weathering powder carefully added (I've learned the hard way that weathering powder is not electrically conductive and will collect exactly where you don't want it to in locomotive trucks if you don't watch it). The weathering on the body is powders and a grey wash. After looking at the pictures I think I'm going back to Allen's "brush fade" technique with applying oil paint, and then wiping most of it off. You just have more control over where stuff dries and the color builds up than with a wash.

    While I was at it I also painted the handrails (an unusual omission by Atlas, they usually get that right on everything but their Trainman locomotives) and added a winterization hatch and bell from Miniatures by Eric. The air horns are the same ones that came on the shell in the wrong position, just sliced off and glued in roughly the right place. I got them backwards (the one pointed forward should be pointed backward and vice verse), but since every one of these ex Great Northern GP7s I look at seems to have something different going on with it's air horns I'm just considering it close enough. Here's a link to a picture of the prototype on rrpicturarchives:

    http://www.rrpicturearchives.net/sho...aspx?id=315811
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