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Thread: Weathering - Brush Fade

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    Default Weathering - Brush Fade

    Hi folks,

    I have a few more units that I just finished up the other day that I'd like to share.
    But first I want to go over this.

    Back when I posted the spray fade, I was in the process of working on these units and trying out a new simpler fading method. It's a combination of two methods that I learned earlier using artist oil tube paint.

    One method is to apply the White paint full strength and then slowly remove and buff it out using a variety of different brushes so that it ends up looking like the paint was faded.

    The other method I was shown is how to apply coats of thinned brown oil paints like a wash to give a rusty appearance, then remove most of it with a "Q" tip.
    What I did instead of applying the white paint full strength and buffing it out was to thin the white paint with thinner and applied it like the brown paint and then removed it with a "Q" tip and leave just enough of the white to resemble a fade coat.


    Quote Originally Posted by pwh70 View Post
    The .pdf is great although from what I've read so far the fade technique is based in airbrushing, so I need to get past that before I can experience "oohhhh, it's easy!!"
    -Paul
    While I used my airbrush to apply the dulling agent, one can certainly apply the dulling agent with a rattle can.


    All you need for this is a tube of white oil paint. I have Titanium White, but you could use a softer white so it won't be so stark, or even mix in a tiny amount of color that is close to the original paint color on your project.



    Two paint brushes.




    And a pile of plain old "Q" tips, and a supply of your favorite dulling agent.

    As before, spray the surface with a dulling agent first and let it dry completely. I let mine dry over night to make sure it's dry.
    Then you'll need to thin the paint just a bit with paint thinner so that it can flow into the crevices with a little help from the brush. Work it in good so that everything is covered [I put on a little more than I needed].




    As soon as you get the paint spread out, you start wiping it off. With the white coat you want to try to get 99% of it off, don't leave any blobs or build ups at all. All you want left is a white film. What the "Q" tip can't get out, you use the brush to pull it out so you can wipe it up with the "Q" tip.




    If you want, you can also use the brush to kind of even things up a bit. With oil paints you have a long dry time, so take your time and really get after the excess paint in places where there are crevices and pockets like the ladders.




    I put a little more paint on the car than I really needed. You need just enough to cover the surface. The thicker and heavier you get it on, the more "Q" tips you'll need to remove it. The first panel to the right of the door you can see where I scrubbed a little too hard and I worked the dull off completely. This happened because I didn't let the dull dry over night but only for a few minutes as I was in a hurry.

    Even if you scrub through it, it won't make much difference as it will give the fade an uneven appearance. Which is OK as things don't always fade evenly.
    Now let it dry over night and then shoot another coat of your dulling agent to seal it up before moving on with another color.


    If you want to take things a bit further you can paint on several different colors of brown paint. 1) tone the white down and 2) add a layer of surface rust. Here's a sample of my primary oil wash colors. Burnt Sienna and Burnt Umber are the two that I use most often for the brown washes.



    The brown paint will tone down the white so that it will not look so stark. When applying the browns, start with a lighter color first, you can stop here or move to a darker color letting each layer dry before sealing it and applying the next color just like you did with the white. If you don't like the layer you just applied you can go back with "Q" tip or sponge that is lightly dampened with paint thinner or 70% IPA to remove the fresh paint. Let it dry a bit and re-apply the same color again until you get the right color that suits you.

    Now unlike removing 99% of the white paint, you can leave behind more of the brown paint, both on the surface and around the crevices so that it will look like a build up of dirt and rust. Here's a sample of what I'm talking about.



    Notice how I wasn't as diligent about getting all of the paint off, but left some around the ladders, door, edges and on the top of the large logo? This was done with only two layers of brown. First I used Burnt Sienna, then a layer of Burnt Umber. If you want a cleaner car, take more paint off. If you want a dirtier car, leave more on. When your happy with the results, remember to let it dry and seal it with a final layer of your dulling agent.

    If your happy with this you can leave it. If you want to add more rust and scratches you can continue onwards.
    But this will give you a good base to work from.
    The Little Rock Line blog


    “Never argue with an idiot. They will only bring you down to their level and beat you with experience." George Carlin


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    OK, here are the units that I applied this technique to.

    An Atlas GP7




    And a pair of Kato E8's





    After applying the white and brown paints, I used some Bragdon powders to finish them off with. I also used a black wash on the trucks and grilles to bring out the details. I wanted these faded and not rustbuckets so I kept the browns to a minimum.

    The A unit is actually more washed out than the B unit is.
    The lighting isn't quite right in these last two pics, sorry. Both units were given the white wash. I used one coat of Burnt Sienna on the B and I mixed the white with some Davy's Gray for a light gray to fade the A unit a little more.
    The Davy's gray is a little darker than the what's shown on the tube.




    There are some better pics of these on
    my blog.
    Last edited by Allen H.; 15th Jan 2013 at 06:07 PM. Reason: Updated link
    The Little Rock Line blog


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    Very nice work.
    Thanks for explaining it so well.

    ? - How long are you letting the oils dry for?
    ? - What are you using for your airbrushed dulling agent?

    Thanks,
    Steve
    Steve - Jugtown Modeler..............Don't know enough about railroading yet, but scale modeling is my life..............Web-Folio

    The introduction of so powerful an agent as steam to a carriage on wheels will make a great change in the situation of man. -- Thomas Jefferson, 1802


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    I've never used oils before, do I need special brushes? What product do I clean up with?

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    I use soft artist sabre brushes, they have orange colour to the bristles, and I just use turps to clean up, or that turps clone they sell that does'nt smell

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    Quote Originally Posted by Jugtown Modeler View Post
    Very nice work.
    Thanks for explaining it so well.

    ? - How long are you letting the oils dry for?
    ? - What are you using for your airbrushed dulling agent?

    Thanks,
    Steve
    Thank you,
    Not a problem.

    With the oils I normally let them dry overnight or at least 24hrs. I'll work on something one night and then I'm lucky if I make it back down to the laboratory the next night.
    The white is pretty much removed from the surface, so it doesn't take near as long to dry, but I still leave it set for the 24 hrs.

    The browns, depending on how much you leave on or what the temperature and humidity is, could take 24-48 hrs. I've seen some guys use a hair drier or small space heater to increase the dry the time, I just leave them set.

    When I start on project, I will normally do two or three at a time. This allows me to stay at the bench for a little longer stretch and also keep from wasting a lot of material as it doesn't take much paint to do one car or loco. Other wise you wind up wiping up more paint with a towel than you use on the car or loco.

    Now some guys have used a "Water Soluble oil paint" Before it dries, you can use water to thin it. I've heard it dries faster than the actual oil versions, so you might want to look into this. Once it dries, water won't touch it.


    As for the dulling agent, I prefer Testors Model Masters Lusterless Flat.

    Sorry I use the term DULLING AGENT as most folks call it "Dull Coat"
    Short story here, I use to use Dull Coat, but I have had problems with that product when they changed the formula several years back.

    This will probably raise some eyebrows at me, but it's your choice and you can choose what you choose to use or believe. Some have said that they are the same product, but they just change the label. I don't think so! Dull Coat and Model Masters are sold by the same company;Testors...yes, but I can see a huge difference between them. A friend who does a lot custom painting had the same problems I did. Sometimes the dull coat would not dry flat, it would dry with a sheen or simi gloss appearance. Other times it would leave a splotchy looking finish. After he told me about MM and I picked up a bottle, I sprayed two stock Atlas Conrail GP38; one with Dull Coat and with MM flat. The difference was incredible, at least to me. The Dull Coat was kind of flat but still had slight sheen. The MM went on evenly and what I would call a "Soft Velvet" look to it and was flat as a pancake!

    This is because Dull Coat is a clear lacquer and the MM flat is basically clear flat paint, or so I was told. But again, I'm not telling you which to use, it's your choice. It is not my intention to start a flame war over a stupid bottle of clear coat.

    I will use the Dull Coat between the oil and weathering coats from time to time if I have some just to save the MM for the finish coat.
    Both products are available in small bottles which will need to be thinned for use in an airbrush. I normally cut mine duller with 30%-50% thinner depending on brand.

    I hope that helps to answer your ?'s

    The Little Rock Line blog


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    Quote Originally Posted by baronjutter View Post
    I've never used oils before, do I need special brushes? What product do I clean up with?
    Quote Originally Posted by hobbes1310 View Post
    I use soft artist sabre brushes, they have orange colour to the bristles, and I just use turps to clean up, or that turps clone they sell that does'nt smell
    Baron,
    Ditto on what hobbes said!


    A cheap bottle of turpentine, paint thinner or mineral spirits that you can get at your local hardware store. Sometimes you can an odorless thinner there as well. Otherwise you can find them at your hobby or craft stores!

    As for brushes, I don't think I ever spent over three bucks for one brush. I use a cheapo brush to apply with, and 'Q" tips to remove it with. The green brush below is kind of what hobbes mentioned I think? I use one like this as it's fairly stiff and it's flat like a chisel so I can get into the crevices to get the white paint worked out. I think it came with 2-3 other brushes for $7 at Hobby Lobby.


    The Little Rock Line blog


    “Never argue with an idiot. They will only bring you down to their level and beat you with experience." George Carlin

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    The oil paints dilluted a bit with turp are also excellent for painting little people, much better highlighting and shadoweffects then with acrylics.
    As long as I can model in N-scale, I know I'm not old

    My Flickr Pages

    http://www.janbouli.com

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    Interesting! I will make note of this.
    Now to see if I ever get that far along....

    Thanks Jan
    The Little Rock Line blog


    “Never argue with an idiot. They will only bring you down to their level and beat you with experience." George Carlin

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    Allen , because of the long drying , make sure you have enough little people to do colors in batches. You realy have to wait till a color is totaly dry, that is longer then a day. I will usualy do all pants and skirts one day then wait a week or so and do all upper body textile etc.

    You don't realy paint them though , it's actualy taking up a bit of turp diluted oil paint and then just touch the parts you want colored, because of the turp the paint will flow onto the figure leaving folds and crevises naturaly looking. Sorry don't know how else to describe this.
    As long as I can model in N-scale, I know I'm not old

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    So you spray down the car with some sort of dull clear spraypaint, paint, remove paint, wait 24 hours to dry, then re-coat in dullcote ? Can you put your final dullcote on earlier at all?

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    Quote Originally Posted by Janbouli View Post
    Allen , because of the long drying , make sure you have enough little people to do colors in batches. You realy have to wait till a color is totaly dry, that is longer then a day. I will usualy do all pants and skirts one day then wait a week or so and do all upper body textile etc.

    You don't realy paint them though , it's actualy taking up a bit of turp diluted oil paint and then just touch the parts you want colored, because of the turp the paint will flow onto the figure leaving folds and crevises naturaly looking. Sorry don't know how else to describe this.
    Jan that's a great idea for small parts like the figures!

    Are you referring to
    ;
    Capillary action - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia

    en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Capillary_action
    Capillary attraction, or capillarity, is the ability of a liquid to flow in narrow spaces without the assistance of, and in opposition to external forces like gravity.

    Thanks.
    The Little Rock Line blog


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    Quote Originally Posted by baronjutter View Post
    So you spray down the car with some sort of dull clear spraypaint, paint, remove paint, wait 24 hours to dry, then re-coat in dullcote ? Can you put your final dullcote on earlier at all?

    Correct!

    Use your choice of a Dulling agent first so the paint will have something to hold to, let dry.

    Then apply the white and/or browns, let dry between coats/colors 24-48hrs.

    and Yes I would wait the same amount of time or longer for the final dull coat depending if the last coat of paint is thicker.

    Then apply the final coat of a dulling agent to seal everything.

    Like I said, I have a tendency to wait at least 24-48 between coats of the oil paints to make sure they are dry. This may vary depending on the temperature and humidity
    . The colder and wetter it is, the longer it will take to dry.
    The Little Rock Line blog


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    Well just went out and bought some tiny tubes of the exact same brand of oil as you showed as well as a cheap brush and some sort of odourless thinner. The real test of skill will be seeing if I can wait 24+ hours. I'm used to just blow-drying all my paint in seconds

    Would this method actually work with non-oil paints so long as you worked quickly?

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    Quote Originally Posted by baronjutter View Post
    The real test of skill will be seeing if I can wait 24+ hours. I'm used to just blow-drying all my paint in seconds



    Quote Originally Posted by baronjutter View Post
    Would this method actually work with non-oil paints so long as you worked quickly?
    Early on I tried doing a black wash, much like the brown wash, and yes, the black acrylic paint dried faster, but it didn't seem to stain the dulling coat. It also got kind of streaky. The thinner it got while taking it off, the faster it dried. When I tried to work the streaks out, it pretty much took it all off back to the orange sprayed on fade coat on this particular car. The oil paint will kind of stain the dulling agent, leaving the colors. You can sure try it, wouldn't hurt. If you don't like the look, use 70% IPA to strip the colors back off.

    Another thing you might want to try sometime is the water soluble oil paint, I have heard they dry a little faster and will stain the dulling agent.


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    Well I went and did it and it didn't turn out so well. No matter how many q-tips I used all the corners and grooves are totally white. Maybe when I give it a wash and some other treatments it will dull the titanium white stuck in the corners and details

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    Quote Originally Posted by baronjutter View Post
    Well I went and did it and it didn't turn out so well. No matter how many q-tips I used all the corners and grooves are totally white. Maybe when I give it a wash and some other treatments it will dull the titanium white stuck in the corners and details
    OK baron, let's have a look at it?
    Can you post some pics for me?

    Did you use a brush to help pull out the white paint from the corners and details and then clean it up with the "Q" tips?
    As long as the paint hasn't dried completely you should be able to do this yet.

    Remember, it's an oil paint, so you can go back through and take the "Q" tip lightly dampened with the thinner and scrub it off before it dries completely.

    Try to post some pics yet tonight, I'll be around the screen for a few more hours, I'm in CST zone.
    If you can't post pics can you email me some?

    PM with your email addy if needed.

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    Uh oh


    railbox turned out nicer but still too WHITE in corners


    I hate putting decals on ribbed cars!!!!

    The decal just won't stick to the ribs... decal solvent stuff doesn't seem to solve one lick.

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    You did good Grasshopper!

    That's a lot better than I expected from the way you described it.

    Here is a shot of my E8B


    The white that you have built up in the ladders on the blue car, can still be worked out, this is where I use the med stiff flat brush on the right


    Use the brush dry and work in and around the ladders and other corners to pull the white out to where you can either spread it out with the brush or a "Q" tip.

    If you don't do anything else to the white and leave it just the way you have it, it should still turn out just fine.
    The Railbox looks great!
    You are correct, the browns will tone the white down when applied.
    If you were to go back and recover the blue box with another coat of white and leave a little more on, just don't scrub as much off, it will look like a heavier fade. Darker colors will take a little more white to fade since they are darker.

    My suggestion is to leave them as they are and let them dry for a spell and see how these turn out.

    Not a thing wrong with them.
    Bravo.
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    Coming along...
    I can't handle the 24+ hour wait times. Is there some magic way to make it dry instantly??
    I feel like I'm handing in homework to be graded

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