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Thread: I don't have grimy black

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    Default I don't have grimy black

    I'm working on a DPM building. The instructions recommend painting the roof with grimy black. I don't have that color but I'm pretty good at mixing. Can anyone describe it? Is it shiny or flat? True black or with other tint in it?

    Thanks in advance.

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    Most RR colors are flat.

    They are recommending black for a traditional "tar" roof look. In my opinion any flat black would do. Maybe a touch of grey or brown to give an aged feel. Tar may go on hot/wet/shiny but ages quickly. Newer roofs may be done with tar paper rolls, rubber, gravel of various colors. Quick net search would give you an idea to match your structure in age, era, etc...

    In short, IMHO, there is no wrong choice. There is a prototype for EVERYTHING.

    Post pics when done!
    Last edited by Jugtown Modeler; 4th May 2014 at 11:43 AM.
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    Grimy black is more of a faded, dirty black, so more like a dark gray. If you mix a little tan and maybe a drop of olive drab green into flat black, with some experimentation, you'll get something similar.
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    I like to mix in a little bit of tan into my black, to get a very dark gray that tends toward the "warm" colors.

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    Yup, just warm up some black with some tan or really whatever. It's on a roof, so precision isn't needed.

    I prefer using grimy black instead flat blacks as loosely general rule. Few things outside are going to stay pristine black for very long. If I want darker, I start with a base of grimy(or dark gray) and use a black wash to darken recesses.

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    Awesome -thanks all. I'll try it today.

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    You could also use a very fine sandpaper for the roll roof instead of paint. It works very well.
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    Quote Originally Posted by spiralcity View Post
    You could also use a very fine sandpaper for the roll roof instead of paint. It works very well.
    Thanks. I agree - I tried it on another model and liked the results. For variety, I'm trying paint this time. The roof sheet is textured, so it's appropriate.

    I had some paint areas to finish before adding the roofs - they would have been in the way. I'll post photos when I'm done.

    Ron

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    Default I used the techniques suggested above for the concrete platform

    The roof will be pretty much the same except it will be my (our) version of Grimy Black.

    1st coat


    2nd coat


    3rd coat


    4th coat



    The last coat was mostly just futzing. When I lightly rubbed a moist paper towel over part of it the texture and reflectivity improved. I couldn't see it happening at the time but when it dried I could see the effect.

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    Default Now I do have grimy black

    Here it is!

    The only thing I did that was not suggested above was to sprinkle it with shavings of soft pastels and some water color pencils while the last coat was still very wet.




    Thanks for the help,

    Ron
    Attached Images Attached Images
    Last edited by calenril; 18th May 2014 at 09:09 AM. Reason: Edit for clarity

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    I made something like grimy black once. I used black, white and some pearlescent white. Pactra acrylic paint.

    I used emery paper on the roof of my freight house.
    You can't outrun your own legs.

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    "pavement' one of the flat colors in Walmart's craft area...$0.50 a bottle, made in USA.

    Great roofing material and also grimy Alco's.
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    2nd vote for Pavement. I've recently discovered it and am quite fond. I've pretty much converted to craft paints entirely.

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    Go to Lowes and buy a can of their Valspar spraypaint in Midnight Radiance. It's a perfect match for the old Floquil and Pollyscale grimy black.

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    Quote Originally Posted by uh_clem View Post
    I made something like grimy black once. I used black, white and some pearlescent white. Pactra acrylic paint.

    I used emery paper on the roof of my freight house.
    Thanks for reading, it was a nice birthday present.
    That pearlescent white must have really made a difference. I'll try to remember it next time I need 'grimy black'.

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