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Thread: Killashandra - 1940s Rural Ireland in Nn3

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    Default Killashandra - 1940s Rural Ireland in Nn3

    To make an otherwise long story shorter, I'll give you the brief version and the link to the primary thread over on the Railwire.
    As I make further progress, I'll post individual updates.

    I was gifted the basis of an 11"x17" layout. Just foam, Masonite roadbed, and handlaid code 40 track.
    I quickly adjusted the landforms and started to shape the tiny layout into a slice of rural Ireland in the 1940s and early 1950s, the end of many of the Irish narrow gauge lines.

    The basis of the line is primarily a coal hauling line for a power-plant. So other than passenger traffic and goods, there are empty and loaded coal trains that frequent the line.

    The scenic siding on the layout will be for a small cattle dock. The two turnouts are non-functioning, and I don't plan on making them function. Way above my pay-grade.

    No houses or major buildings. Just a few trees. Lots of tall lush grasses. A dirt road and a man with his horse and cart.

    Motive power is a Märklin 0-6-0 (newer one with 5-pole motor) and my current rolling stock roster is all Peco N6.5 wagon kits. The engine is due for a kitbash sooner or later. Whenever I feel motivated about it.


    Anyhow, the main thread on the Railwire is here: http://www.therailwire.net/forum/ind...?topic=32771.0


    Cheers!


    -Cody F.
    Cody W Fisher - President of Camden & Amboy Models

    Capitol Free-MoN - NJ Division

    Modeling: PRR during WWII, 1950s PRSL, Great Western Railway 1920-1948, Rural Ireland 3ft gauge 1940s-50s, USSR 1980s, DPRK circa 2008.

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    hey Cody. Good to see you over here on the nSn.

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    Quote Originally Posted by ngaugecharlie View Post
    The influence for my line is primarily the Tralee & Dingle Railway. I say influence only because my layout doesn't portray an actual location.
    Cody W Fisher - President of Camden & Amboy Models

    Capitol Free-MoN - NJ Division

    Modeling: PRR during WWII, 1950s PRSL, Great Western Railway 1920-1948, Rural Ireland 3ft gauge 1940s-50s, USSR 1980s, DPRK circa 2008.

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    Quote Originally Posted by VonRyan View Post
    The influence for my line is primarily the Tralee & Dingle Railway. I say influence only because my layout doesn't portray an actual location.
    Lovely part of the country
    if you need any info pm me
    thx
    charlie

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    Onward with some progress.

    I got some lightweight spackle and smoothed out the land contours.






    Then I decided to use some of my Peco slate-pattern styrene to start on the cattle dock. I painted it a base color of "Slate Grey" and highlighted some individual slabs with two other colors.



    And of course I also painted the landscape "Medium Brown" again to see how things are coming together.




    I also cut another piece of the Peco styrene just as a placeholder for the small stone bridge/culvert. The slate look doesn't work here, so I'm open to hearing about any possible alternatives for what to use to make the stone bridge/culvert.







    Cheers!

    -Cody F.
    Cody W Fisher - President of Camden & Amboy Models

    Capitol Free-MoN - NJ Division

    Modeling: PRR during WWII, 1950s PRSL, Great Western Railway 1920-1948, Rural Ireland 3ft gauge 1940s-50s, USSR 1980s, DPRK circa 2008.

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    For making the culvert, you could just take a slab of air-dry clay and draw in mortar lines with a fine-tipped-something (pencil?), to give a whatever stone pattern you want. Make it have a nice arch and it could be rather sexy. You might even be able to find a photo of something similar, and just print it out to the right size then trace the lines, making impressions in the clay as you do. If it were me, though, while I might refer to some photos for inspiration, I'd just wing it when sculpting the clay.

    Also, you probably want the stone wall to extend a bit further left and right than what you show, so that there is room for the slope of the ground to fall on either side. You could maybe use some junk cardboard (from used packaging) to rough out a shape that fits the area, then use that as a pattern for shaping the block of clay.

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    You could go with rough cut stone made of linoleum tile. Very adaptable. Creates very realistic structures because you are using prototypical construction methods.

    You pick the thickness of the tile and score-snap to size stones. Use PVA (white) glue for mortar.The score-snap cutting method leaves a rough stone-like surface o the edges. Top and bottom a smooth and flat. If creating an arch use the stones perpendicular to the others, just like the prototype did. A compass cutter with help you layout curved stones.
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    Quote Originally Posted by WP&P View Post
    For making the culvert, you could just take a slab of air-dry clay and draw in mortar lines with a fine-tipped-something (pencil?), to give a whatever stone pattern you want. Make it have a nice arch and it could be rather sexy. You might even be able to find a photo of something similar, and just print it out to the right size then trace the lines, making impressions in the clay as you do. If it were me, though, while I might refer to some photos for inspiration, I'd just wing it when sculpting the clay.


    Also, you probably want the stone wall to extend a bit further left and right than what you show, so that there is room for the slope of the ground to fall on either side. You could maybe use some junk cardboard (from used packaging) to rough out a shape that fits the area, then use that as a pattern for shaping the block of clay.

    Well for the culvert once it is installed, it'll get lightweight spackle around it to blend it in, so the width of it will be the same width as the piece of styrene that is in there now.



    Quote Originally Posted by ChicagoNW View Post
    You could go with rough cut stone made of linoleum tile. Very adaptable. Creates very realistic structures because you are using prototypical construction methods.

    You pick the thickness of the tile and score-snap to size stones. Use PVA (white) glue for mortar.The score-snap cutting method leaves a rough stone-like surface o the edges. Top and bottom a smooth and flat. If creating an arch use the stones perpendicular to the others, just like the prototype did. A compass cutter with help you layout curved stones.
    That's more or less my last ditch effort.
    Building the entire thing (it has to have he interior walls/ceiling for when I take photographs) from individual blocks is something I am hoping to avoid.
    Cody W Fisher - President of Camden & Amboy Models

    Capitol Free-MoN - NJ Division

    Modeling: PRR during WWII, 1950s PRSL, Great Western Railway 1920-1948, Rural Ireland 3ft gauge 1940s-50s, USSR 1980s, DPRK circa 2008.

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    It goes a lot faster than you think plus you are not doing something that big. Since this is a railroad bridge larger stones make the task faster.
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    So the linoleum option isn't going to work for what I need. I'm currently at a loss for other options, but hopefully will have something sorted out sooner or later.

    In other news, there is now more ballast on the layout and the cattle dock has been back filled with spackle.

    And since photos don't want to upload from my phone, they'll have to wait till I have a chance to sit down at my laptop and pull the URLs from Facebook.
    Cody W Fisher - President of Camden & Amboy Models

    Capitol Free-MoN - NJ Division

    Modeling: PRR during WWII, 1950s PRSL, Great Western Railway 1920-1948, Rural Ireland 3ft gauge 1940s-50s, USSR 1980s, DPRK circa 2008.

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    I forgot to post the photos of the recent ballasting while I was on my laptop yesterday, so I must remember to do that tomorrow.

    Anyhow, I was given a suggestion for a solution to my small stone bridge problem over on NGRM-Online.
    So I went ahead and purchased this: http://pages.ebay.com/link/?nav=item...d=380241131439

    I know it says it's a OO kit, but it's small size makes it the perfect solution. All I'll have to do is buy some thin stone-pattern styrene sheet and make the interior walls/ceiling.
    Once that arrives and is installed, and once I get the final capstones on the abutments of the other bridge, I can then ballast the rest of the track.

    My ultimate goal is to have at least the ballasting and the dirt roads finished in time for me to take the layout to the Bedford N-Scale Weekend in August. Anything else I get completed before then is an added bonus.



    -Cody F.
    Cody W Fisher - President of Camden & Amboy Models

    Capitol Free-MoN - NJ Division

    Modeling: PRR during WWII, 1950s PRSL, Great Western Railway 1920-1948, Rural Ireland 3ft gauge 1940s-50s, USSR 1980s, DPRK circa 2008.

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    Here's those progress photos that I've been meaning to post...

    While the glue was still wet:



    When the glue was finally dry and some discolored ties were touched up:



    And now for a comparison...
    7mm Standard-Gauge and 2mm Narrow-Gauge:





    Still to do (while I wait for the OO cattle-creep kit to arrive) is the capstones on the bridge abutments and a tad bit more spackling to do around the loading platform.
    I also need to harvest some fine soil for the dirt road and for the top of the loading platform.




    Until my next update...

    Cheers!
    -Cody F.
    Cody W Fisher - President of Camden & Amboy Models

    Capitol Free-MoN - NJ Division

    Modeling: PRR during WWII, 1950s PRSL, Great Western Railway 1920-1948, Rural Ireland 3ft gauge 1940s-50s, USSR 1980s, DPRK circa 2008.

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    So my "perfect" solution for the small stone bridge turned out to just be a waste of money.
    The Wills cattle-creep won't work, even with extensive modification.
    So now I'm back to searching for a solution... And hoping that my five Walthers kits sell soon as I need to put some money into my pocket if any progress is to be made in the next few months.
    Cody W Fisher - President of Camden & Amboy Models

    Capitol Free-MoN - NJ Division

    Modeling: PRR during WWII, 1950s PRSL, Great Western Railway 1920-1948, Rural Ireland 3ft gauge 1940s-50s, USSR 1980s, DPRK circa 2008.

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    My first thought was a piece of foambaord with the stones drawn in with a ball point pen to create the grooves. The type of foam that would work is sold at Hobby Lobby for a couple of dollars and is sandwiched between 2 thin layers of cardboard. You just cut to shape, strip the cardboard off, then stencil in the stones. I think it is just called foam board and it is back by the poster/canvas supplies behind the models section.

    The first 2 ideas were very good, also, but this may be a faster method if that's what you are looking for. BTW, I really like this super neat diorama!

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    Quote Originally Posted by Mobile One View Post
    My first thought was a piece of foambaord with the stones drawn in with a ball point pen to create the grooves. The type of foam that would work is sold at Hobby Lobby for a couple of dollars and is sandwiched between 2 thin layers of cardboard. You just cut to shape, strip the cardboard off, then stencil in the stones. I think it is just called foam board and it is back by the poster/canvas supplies behind the models section.

    The first 2 ideas were very good, also, but this may be a faster method if that's what you are looking for. BTW, I really like this super neat diorama!
    If it wasn't for this layout, I'd probably consider it. But with Killashandra I'm going for as much fine detail as physically possible, so I need something less coarse.

    When scenics are completed, the layout will be subjected to a lot of macro photography, so fine detail is a huge requirement.
    Cody W Fisher - President of Camden & Amboy Models

    Capitol Free-MoN - NJ Division

    Modeling: PRR during WWII, 1950s PRSL, Great Western Railway 1920-1948, Rural Ireland 3ft gauge 1940s-50s, USSR 1980s, DPRK circa 2008.

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    Well, good luck!

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    Do you have a picture of the prototype you want to mimic?

    You might want to consider the stuff I used for these retaining walls. The texture could be enhanced with some weathering or mortar lines.

    It's from one of the European companies. It's a molded closed cell foam that has some flex to it. It comes in sheets of about 5x12 inches. It could be originally for HO retaining walls. I capped it with styrene strip.
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    Update:

    Soil was collected and sifted.

    I put it in my toaster oven to kill any bacteria, and I think I ended up burning my dirt...
    When I put it in the toaster oven it was light tan, and when I pulled it out (and even after it cooled down) it's now brown.

    So it looks like I'm going to have to try and see if I can buy the right shade of dirt that I need...
    Cody W Fisher - President of Camden & Amboy Models

    Capitol Free-MoN - NJ Division

    Modeling: PRR during WWII, 1950s PRSL, Great Western Railway 1920-1948, Rural Ireland 3ft gauge 1940s-50s, USSR 1980s, DPRK circa 2008.

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    Toaster oven probably isnt the right type of oven, a standard oven at 105C or 220F (there-about, 10 degrees above water boiling point) is the best way to dry out soil. Geo-technical labs do this all the time and it doesn't discolour the soil. it will be 100% moisture free and nothing worth thinking about will be left living on it.
    Applying real world Structural engineering to completely over-engineer a model railroad? You're either daft, or Chickenhawk

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