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Thread: Killashandra - 1940s Rural Ireland in Nn3

  1. #21
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    Quote Originally Posted by Chickenhawk View Post
    Toaster oven probably isnt the right type of oven, a standard oven at 105C or 220F (there-about, 10 degrees above water boiling point) is the best way to dry out soil. Geo-technical labs do this all the time and it doesn't discolour the soil. it will be 100% moisture free and nothing worth thinking about will be left living on it.
    I had the toaster over up to about 250°F
    From what I was told elsewhere, the discoloration has in part to do with the composition of the soil.
    So now I need someone to hurry up and buy the Walthers kits I have for sale so that I can buy some fine soil from Highball.
    Cody W Fisher - President of Camden & Amboy Models

    Capitol Free-MoN - NJ Division

    Modeling: PRR during WWII, 1950s PRSL, Great Western Railway 1920-1948, Rural Ireland 3ft gauge 1940s-50s, USSR 1980s, DPRK circa 2008.

  2. #22
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    Quote Originally Posted by ChicagoNW View Post
    Do you have a picture of the prototype you want to mimic?

    You might want to consider the stuff I used for these retaining walls. The texture could be enhanced with some weathering or mortar lines.
    https://www.nscale.net/forums/attachm...5&d=1328134815
    It's from one of the European companies. It's a molded closed cell foam that has some flex to it. It comes in sheets of about 5x12 inches. It could be originally for HO retaining walls. I capped it with styrene strip.

    This is what I was going to chop up for use as the small stone bridge:


    It's actually a OO-gauge kit.
    Cody W Fisher - President of Camden & Amboy Models

    Capitol Free-MoN - NJ Division

    Modeling: PRR during WWII, 1950s PRSL, Great Western Railway 1920-1948, Rural Ireland 3ft gauge 1940s-50s, USSR 1980s, DPRK circa 2008.

  3. #23
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    Progress has ground to a halt. Between being unable to find a solution for the small stone bridge and the fact that no one has bought any of the Walthers cornerstone kits that I'm trying to get rid of, I'm dead in the water.

    The only "progress" is on the virtual frontier with the ongoing creation of a locomotive shell to suit the Märklin 0-6-0 that I have.


    It would appear that a period of unavoidable dormancy is due to set upon the layout.
    Cody W Fisher - President of Camden & Amboy Models

    Capitol Free-MoN - NJ Division

    Modeling: PRR during WWII, 1950s PRSL, Great Western Railway 1920-1948, Rural Ireland 3ft gauge 1940s-50s, USSR 1980s, DPRK circa 2008.

  4. #24
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    There's no reason you have to buy "dirt" from a far away company. There are only about a thousand different ways to simulate bare earth. Not all of them expensive.

    Have you taken a look at the local landscaping company? The stuff you want to shell out big bucks for is their scrap. Yeah it's the stuff left over from crushed rocks. It's just rock dust. A landscaper will have several colors of it. Then again some people call it colored grout.

    I've made pretty dirt like stuff using Tempra Paint. Need thicker stuff add stuff like talcum powder, baking soda, art sand, plaster, Celuclay or even Sculptimold.

    After looking up that kit on other places what's the matter with it? It looks very adaptable. Easy to chop up and reconfigure. Then again the linoleum method is a lot faster than you think. Once you've snapped a bunch of stones they assemble in seconds. The landscaper has great kits for stone bridges, just add glue and a form.
    Use what you know about the world to model…
    Learn from modeling what you don't know about the real world.



  5. #25
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    Quote Originally Posted by ChicagoNW View Post
    There's no reason you have to buy "dirt" from a far away company. There are only about a thousand different ways to simulate bare earth. Not all of them expensive.

    Have you taken a look at the local landscaping company? The stuff you want to shell out big bucks for is their scrap. Yeah it's the stuff left over from crushed rocks. It's just rock dust. A landscaper will have several colors of it. Then again some people call it colored grout.

    I've made pretty dirt like stuff using Tempra Paint. Need thicker stuff add stuff like talcum powder, baking soda, art sand, plaster, Celuclay or even Sculptimold.

    After looking up that kit on other places what's the matter with it? It looks very adaptable. Easy to chop up and reconfigure. Then again the linoleum method is a lot faster than you think. Once you've snapped a bunch of stones they assemble in seconds. The landscaper has great kits for stone bridges, just add glue and a form.
    Highball offers the specific color I need, so rather than burn a tank of premium trying to find something even relatively close to what I need at a garden center, it's cheaper in the long run to just order exactly what I need.

    As for the Wills cattle-creep. It's no good. The archway is too large. I need something with a 18-22mm opening.
    The linoleum method is just too large and too coarse to work in such a tiny space, especially one that has to stand up to macro photography. There's just too many variables with it and not enough fine control over it for me to be able to work with it. My hands won't do with it what needs to be done to reach the required outcome.
    Cody W Fisher - President of Camden & Amboy Models

    Capitol Free-MoN - NJ Division

    Modeling: PRR during WWII, 1950s PRSL, Great Western Railway 1920-1948, Rural Ireland 3ft gauge 1940s-50s, USSR 1980s, DPRK circa 2008.

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    Ordered some Highball fine light-brown soil from M.B. Kleins.
    Other than that, no progress.
    Cody W Fisher - President of Camden & Amboy Models

    Capitol Free-MoN - NJ Division

    Modeling: PRR during WWII, 1950s PRSL, Great Western Railway 1920-1948, Rural Ireland 3ft gauge 1940s-50s, USSR 1980s, DPRK circa 2008.

  7. #27
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    Highball Products #171 "Earth" "fine light brown" clearly isn't any form of soil whatsoever.
    It obviously looks like a sack of tiny sawdust rather than a fine soil.
    It's also a cream color. Not light-brown.
    This stuff FLUFFS when I shake the packaging. And when I grip it, it holds it's shape.
    The biggest giveaway is it's size in relation to weight. The bag is the size of a 4x6" notecard, yet it only weighs 3oz.
    I can even see a sliver of wood inside the packaging.


    I'm extremely displeased. I expect this kind of nonsense from Woodland Scenics, but not from a company like Highball.


    Now I have to figure out how to do the returns process.


    Highball Products shall be hearing about my displeasure.
    Cody W Fisher - President of Camden & Amboy Models

    Capitol Free-MoN - NJ Division

    Modeling: PRR during WWII, 1950s PRSL, Great Western Railway 1920-1948, Rural Ireland 3ft gauge 1940s-50s, USSR 1980s, DPRK circa 2008.

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  9. #28
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    I have two potential solutions for the small stone bridge. One is a casting from a friend, and the other is a plastic arch made by Wills and is exactly 20.5mm wide and combined with some Slater's embossed sheet it should work quite well.

    Once I have both options in hand I shall paint both of them and figure out which one will suit the space best.

    So I'll at least have the bridges done, which will allow me to finish ballasting, but this whole nonsense with Highball's fake "earth" has left quite a sour taste in my mouth so to speak.
    Cody W Fisher - President of Camden & Amboy Models

    Capitol Free-MoN - NJ Division

    Modeling: PRR during WWII, 1950s PRSL, Great Western Railway 1920-1948, Rural Ireland 3ft gauge 1940s-50s, USSR 1980s, DPRK circa 2008.

  10. #29
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    Working on one of two possible solutions for the small stone bridge issue. One if them will ultimately be permanently installed on the layout. Right now it's just a matter of determining which one.

    Still haven't found a soil solution. I have one idea in mind that all depend on whether it yields the fine grade of light-colored soil I need.

    - - - Updated - - -

    Working on one of two possible solutions for the small stone bridge issue. One if them will ultimately be permanently installed on the layout. Right now it's just a matter of determining which one.

    Still haven't found a soil solution. I have one idea in mind that all depend on whether it yields the fine grade of light-colored soil I need.
    Cody W Fisher - President of Camden & Amboy Models

    Capitol Free-MoN - NJ Division

    Modeling: PRR during WWII, 1950s PRSL, Great Western Railway 1920-1948, Rural Ireland 3ft gauge 1940s-50s, USSR 1980s, DPRK circa 2008.

  11. #30
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    I've used a couple of Arizona Rock and Mineral's products, including "high desert" and "low desert" soils. It's real dirt, and useful when you want a particular shade that you can't just go out back and scoop up. I've found it on the usual online stores, and also ordered a particular type (the low desert soil) from Fifers when I couldn't find it in stock anywhere.

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    So it's about time that I post some progress photos... Especially since these were taken before I left to head to the Bedford N-Scale Weekend:





    Of course, I owe a great many thanks to a fellow Railwire member, Lemosteam, for the awesome castings which solved the lengthy "small bridge dilemma" that was plaguing progress for the longest time.

    The interior wall of the bridge didn't go as well as I would have liked, but the thin Slater's stone sheet worked as planned, just that I suck at things and there are some gaps under there. So that means no taking photos that may reveal the shoddy job I did under there.


    Anyhow, here are a few recent photos of some more progress:






    I finally finished putting the capstones on the lefthand abutment, meaning that now both bridges are 100% finished.
    And of course, that means that I can complete the ballasting of the trackage, which of course is an important milestone. One which I would have liked to have completed before I went to Bedford, but ultimately that didn't happen.
    I also finished the terrain around the small stone bridge and painted the bare white spackle the usual Duncan "Medium Brown".
    Once I have the trackage 100% ballasted, I shall turn my attention to rolling stock. I need to order up some tophat bearings to install in the sideframes of my Peco wagon kits so that the Marklin wheelsets will actually roll rather than slide along. Although, I may look into Fox Valley's Z-scale wheelsets since I suspect that they have a much nicer look to them.




    For the layout to actually be at a point where the land contours are finished, supporting infrastructure is finished and installed, and the track is almost completely ballasted... It's quite a humbling sight. Being that I'm one who doesn't finish many of the projects that I start, it is quite a change of pace watching various stages of my layout reach completion.



    Cheers!

    -Cody F.
    Cody W Fisher - President of Camden & Amboy Models

    Capitol Free-MoN - NJ Division

    Modeling: PRR during WWII, 1950s PRSL, Great Western Railway 1920-1948, Rural Ireland 3ft gauge 1940s-50s, USSR 1980s, DPRK circa 2008.

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  14. #32
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    Don't everyone talk at once...
    Cody W Fisher - President of Camden & Amboy Models

    Capitol Free-MoN - NJ Division

    Modeling: PRR during WWII, 1950s PRSL, Great Western Railway 1920-1948, Rural Ireland 3ft gauge 1940s-50s, USSR 1980s, DPRK circa 2008.

  15. #33
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    A quick update:

    I'm currently in the process of assembling a couple point levers which will adorn the cosmetic turnouts.
    One little etch is designed to yield 12 point levers, but I've lost enough parts for two and only managed to paint enough parts for two. Now to try and assemble them...

    I'll post a couple photos once I have them completed. However, I won't install them just yet. They're quite fragile so they will be some of the last things I install.
    Cody W Fisher - President of Camden & Amboy Models

    Capitol Free-MoN - NJ Division

    Modeling: PRR during WWII, 1950s PRSL, Great Western Railway 1920-1948, Rural Ireland 3ft gauge 1940s-50s, USSR 1980s, DPRK circa 2008.

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    I find it fascinating that is a nickel in the upper left. I didn't quite realize the size!

  17. #35
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    So while hiding in the air conditioning on Friday, I put together a couple of extremely tiny detail parts...





    They are Point Levers made by Shire Scenes. They're an etched-brass kit. Each point lever is made up of three very tiny parts. Of course, for each one that I completed (two) I lost enough parts to make another. Luckily I only had to build two of them.



    And yesterday night I made some progress that can actually be seen without squinting. More ballast!


    Seen here while it was still wet:




    And after it was pretty much dry:







    Only 4.5" of track remains unballasted, but it is soon to be done as all I need to do beforehand is finish a couple minor details involving the girder bridge.

    I also shall be taking care of putting soil down for the riverbed. I still have yet to locate a suitable fine light-tan/cream-color real soil/sand for use on the dirt roads.
    Having the roads and the riverbed completed is a prerequisite for putting down some real scenery, of which a good bit of the scenery is going to be static grass, which I have luckily been offered help with.
    But if I can't find what I need to get the dirt roads done, then it means no greenery.


    -Cody F.
    Cody W Fisher - President of Camden & Amboy Models

    Capitol Free-MoN - NJ Division

    Modeling: PRR during WWII, 1950s PRSL, Great Western Railway 1920-1948, Rural Ireland 3ft gauge 1940s-50s, USSR 1980s, DPRK circa 2008.

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  19. #36
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    Quote Originally Posted by tappertrainman View Post
    I find it fascinating that is a nickel in the upper left. I didn't quite realize the size!
    It can be quite deceiving since I take a lot of the photos pretty close up with my iPhone.

    The layout is only 11x17 inches and the "benchwork" (really just a baseboard in this case) is nothing more than a slab of 2" thick pink foam.

    Of course, working with a layout this small ultimately means that it is more challenging to get things right. Every detail needs to be just so or it may ultimately make the layout look too crowded.




    Speaking of which, my plan for non-train details is that they all will be in "resting" positions. All people and animals on the layout will be placed so that they are in stationary positions. Like there will be livestock in the cattle pens, and the farmer and his partner will be leaning against the fence chatting. The few sheep on the hillside will either be laying down or grazing. There will also be a farmer and his horse-drawn cart, but they will either be loading/unloading some things at the platform, or they will be at one of the two level crossings waiting for the train to pass. That way, since only the trains will be moving, figures and such wont appear to be frozen in mid-action. Plus, it all contributes to the overall laid-back rural atmosphere.



    -Cody F.
    Cody W Fisher - President of Camden & Amboy Models

    Capitol Free-MoN - NJ Division

    Modeling: PRR during WWII, 1950s PRSL, Great Western Railway 1920-1948, Rural Ireland 3ft gauge 1940s-50s, USSR 1980s, DPRK circa 2008.

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  21. #37
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    Quote Originally Posted by VonRyan View Post
    They are Point Levers made by Shire Scenes. They're an etched-brass kit. Each point lever is made up of three very tiny parts.
    Those are decorative though, right?

    Sharp looking narrow gauge track work. Made even better by the clean ballast work.
    Steve - Jugtown Modeler..............Don't know enough about railroading yet, but scale modeling is my life..............Web-Folio

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  22. #38
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    Quote Originally Posted by Jugtown Modeler View Post
    Those are decorative though, right?

    Sharp looking narrow gauge track work. Made even better by the clean ballast work.
    They are indeed decorative Steve. I couldn't imagine trying to make them function. I'd probably loose my mind doing so.
    The turnouts are also cosmetic, so no worries there.

    And thanks for the compliments on the trackwork. I probably should have gone with a cinder ballast, but since this layout isn't based on any one specific railway or location, I can live with it.

    If I were to do another layout, it would be based on a prototype location(s) and lines. But for now, I'm more focused on getting the layout further along.
    Cody W Fisher - President of Camden & Amboy Models

    Capitol Free-MoN - NJ Division

    Modeling: PRR during WWII, 1950s PRSL, Great Western Railway 1920-1948, Rural Ireland 3ft gauge 1940s-50s, USSR 1980s, DPRK circa 2008.

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  24. #39
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    This is coming along really nicely, keep up the great work. Once you start adding the ground foam and similar it's really going to start to pop. :-D
    Applying real world Structural engineering to completely over-engineer a model railroad? You're either daft, or Chickenhawk

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    What a lovely little layout. What are you planning to do for motive power? Any particular prototype loco or will you be going for a tram type?

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