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Thread: Union Pacific Railroad in the Cascades - Garage Layout

  1. #21
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    I agree check out Michael's thread as well as ScottL's thread. Both have fantastic trees. There are others for sure (but I don't remember them all).

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  3. #22
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    I have watched both of those threads with great interest. I am a long way off till I start worrying about scenery at this time. Still need to finish the staging level and both helix(s).
    CraigS

    Union Pacific Railroad in the Cascades - Garage Layout

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    I have run into problem with my helix and I am looking for suggestions. I made a mistake and got ahead of myself and glued the track down before I ran a locomotive to test the joining of the next level. The loco stops as it goes over the join and it looks to me that it is at a peak. Laying a level over the connection, it is not smooth and rocks back and forth. The track is glued down with Elmer's glue (dang wish I used nails). My initial thought was to pull up the track and sand the connection nice and smooth. If that is the best solution, how do I get the track up with out damaging it?

    20160523_094943.jpg
    CraigS

    Union Pacific Railroad in the Cascades - Garage Layout

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  6. #24
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    Can you unscrew the roadbed from your support, and slip a jigsaw/sawzall between top of support and bottom of plywood and trim off the top of the support ?

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    I could do that, but then I am not sure about the height clearance for the track below. Currently it is at 2" and I think I need to take off about 1/8".
    CraigS

    Union Pacific Railroad in the Cascades - Garage Layout

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    Is it just Elmers white glue ? Might be able to reactivate it with water and loosen the track that way.

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    What went wrong here is the first blocks holding up a helix like this need to have an angle cut on the top of the block matching the grade and yours didn't so the left side has the subroadbed touching the outer corner of the block and there's a gap between the subroadbed and the block in the center where the joint is. On the right side the opposite is true. The subroadbed touches the block in the middle and should have a gap by the edge of the block. In this case (right side) you tightened the screw too much. If you have access to the fasteners on the bottom of the block just loosen them and shim up the right side up to fix the problem.

    O

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  12. #28
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    Shimming might a lot easier than doing the cutting or removing the glue. I do have access to the screws on top but the bottom is glued. When I do the helix on the "down" side, how much of an angle should I cut the risers at?
    CraigS

    Union Pacific Railroad in the Cascades - Garage Layout

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    Quote Originally Posted by CraigS View Post
    I have run into problem with my helix and I am looking for suggestions. I made a mistake and got ahead of myself and glued the track down before I ran a locomotive to test the joining of the next level. The loco stops as it goes over the join and it looks to me that it is at a peak. Laying a level over the connection, it is not smooth and rocks back and forth. The track is glued down with Elmer's glue (dang wish I used nails). My initial thought was to pull up the track and sand the connection nice and smooth. If that is the best solution, how do I get the track up with out damaging it?

    Soak the track good with water and it should come up.
    Then I suggest you start over with the helix. On my helix, I used the tablesaw with a dado blade and made lap joints (4" overlap) so that the whole helix is like one piece.
    If you don't have access to do that, then you could double up 1/4" plywood by gluing it together and staggering the joints. This will help with the construction a lot. I know its a lot of sawing with a saw, but in the end, you'll have a lot less problems. Also you might think about painting and sealing the plywood well, to keep the expansion and contraction due to humidity down to a minimum.
    Rodney

    Here is my build of my n-scale railroad
    http://www.nscale.net/forums/showthr...-50-8-quot-%29

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    I spent the weekend tearing down the "UP" helix and fixing the grade as well as the track. While working on the grade issue, I found that a section of flex track was not laid properly and was causing a derailment every time my locomotive passed through it. Since I did not want to have on going issues, I took the it down to the first layer, shimmed the grade a bit to remove the hump (found that I used the wrong size of support), added in a new piece of flex track, soldered it and tested the heck out of it. My test locomotive goes up and down the helix like it should will no issues. Now I can start adding the next levels and get this thing done. Still working out in my head how I am going to wire this up though. I have added two sets of feeder wires to each level across from each other. They work out to be a set every other piece of flex track. I am hoping that is going to be enough. Not much to show in pictures at this time.
    CraigS

    Union Pacific Railroad in the Cascades - Garage Layout

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  17. #31
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    Quote Originally Posted by CraigS View Post
    I spent the weekend tearing down the "UP" helix and fixing the grade as well as the track. While working on the grade issue, I found that a section of flex track was not laid properly and was causing a derailment every time my locomotive passed through it. Since I did not want to have on going issues, I took the it down to the first layer, shimmed the grade a bit to remove the hump (found that I used the wrong size of support), added in a new piece of flex track, soldered it and tested the heck out of it. My test locomotive goes up and down the helix like it should will no issues. Now I can start adding the next levels and get this thing done. Still working out in my head how I am going to wire this up though. I have added two sets of feeder wires to each level across from each other. They work out to be a set every other piece of flex track. I am hoping that is going to be enough. Not much to show in pictures at this time.

    Glad to hear you got this fixed up. Any new progress to show us?

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    Latest progress ... I have finished laying all the track for the staging yard, now I just need to wire it up and add the turnout control (servers, octopus III). Still thinking about how I want to throw the turnouts. I also did some none train related work in the room .. finally added a door. My train room is in the back half of my second garage and I keep having visitors that like to lay all over the floor in the way. This way I can block them out when I am laying on the floor doing the wiring.


    20160703_093244.jpg
    Current status of the UP helix. My test engine runs great both up and down, just need to order some more Atlas code 55 track to finish it.

    20160703_093255.jpg
    Staging yard ladder closest to the UP helix

    20160703_093301.jpg

    Staging yard middle

    20160703_093306.jpg
    Staging yard middle (cont.)

    20160703_093313.jpg
    Staging yard ladder closest to the DOWN helix

    20160703_093331.jpg
    Door leading into the train room (not sure how to rotate it)

    I really like the ME code 55 weathered track. I can easily remove the weathering from the top and it saves me one step. The rail joiners are a pain to connect.
    CraigS

    Union Pacific Railroad in the Cascades - Garage Layout

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    It might be an optical illusion but the transition from the switches to the flex track looks like they might have a bit of a kink in them. make sure you test all of those joints throughly with an engine and several light weight rail cars to ensure you will not have issues. I recommend using flat cars and pushing them through the joint as well as pulling them through the joint to make sure there's no issues.

    O

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    Thanks for pointing that out, but it might be the way the picture was taken. I have tested them by pushing a single car through. I want to run trains before I say we are good to go.
    CraigS

    Union Pacific Railroad in the Cascades - Garage Layout

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    Today I finished all the feeder wiring for the track. I still need to hook up the controls for the turnouts. While I was checking the track I noticed that I have a very large gap that I am not sure if I should fix it. My layout room is about 85 degrees right now, so it is a bit hot. Will this gap decrease when it cools off? Thoughts?

    20160714_163349.jpg
    CraigS

    Union Pacific Railroad in the Cascades - Garage Layout

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    Uh, the gap would increase as it cools. You're definitely going to want to fix that.

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    It may seem like a pain, but when you fix a potential problem area, you'll never look back and say "gee I wish I hadn't fixed that".
    @dwwojcik is right, it's only going to get worse when things cool off. Right now, you're almost certainly going to have derailments. You may also damage wheels as it looks like there's enough room for them to drop and then knocked against the other rail. That force may also drive it further apart.

    I would inspect all surrounding track too because you may have knocked something else out of alignment. I keep a truck with metal wheels on it that I just run over track with my finger on top. The metal wheels let me feel any imperfection that a track gauge won't tell me about. I may make an inspection car one of these days (just a piece of plexiglas with two trucks attached), but still like the direct feel.

    Keep in mind a little gap is good for handling temperature change. I laid a lot of track in the winter and used a razor blade as a gauge for the gap. I've had no buckling problems as yet and it's been a hot summer for here.
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    I would venture that the humidity changes causing the wood frame to expand and contract might cause more a shift than the temperature-related expansion of the metal rail?

    Linux Punk

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    Thank you for the advice, going to fix the gap issue today.
    CraigS

    Union Pacific Railroad in the Cascades - Garage Layout

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    On my track the gaps always shrink when its cold...lower humidity, wood benchwork shrinks, track kinks from getting squeezed together. But yeah, that gap looks overly large and would probably cause problems.
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