Page 1 of 2 12 LastLast
Results 1 to 20 of 28

Thread: Modeling neglected trackage

  1. #1
    Join Date
    May 2016
    Posts
    2,044
    Blog Entries
    2
    Thanks
    779
    Thanked 2,318 Times in 776 Posts
    Mentioned
    68 Post(s)
    Tagged
    1 Thread(s)

    Default Modeling neglected trackage

    Most people strive for a prototypical layout and realism. Yet we all like nice running layouts where there are no problems, as we get enough of them by default.

    Yet I have never, ever, ever seen trackage, even on a siding, that looks as neglected as it does in real life. There are no waist-high weeds, ties sunken into the ground, completely devoid of ballast. Everyone's layouts have beautiful ballast and even the siding to the sewage plant is on highball rail that could take passenger trains doing 95 mph.

    Has anyone ever done a layout of a 'pumpkin line', where the track speed is 10mph and the cars and diesels rock to and fro, up and down, just begging for a derailment? Or even attempted to make a siding look like a real siding?

  2. #2
    Join Date
    Dec 2003
    Location
    Columbus,OH, USA
    Posts
    3,261
    Thanks
    79
    Thanked 1,571 Times in 912 Posts
    Mentioned
    44 Post(s)
    Tagged
    0 Thread(s)

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by P-LineSoo View Post
    Most people strive for a prototypical layout and realism. Yet we all like nice running layouts where there are no problems, as we get enough of them by default.

    Yet I have never, ever, ever seen trackage, even on a siding, that looks as neglected as it does in real life. There are no waist-high weeds, ties sunken into the ground, completely devoid of ballast. Everyone's layouts have beautiful ballast and even the siding to the sewage plant is on highball rail that could take passenger trains doing 95 mph.

    Has anyone ever done a layout of a 'pumpkin line', where the track speed is 10mph and the cars and diesels rock to and fro, up and down, just begging for a derailment? Or even attempted to make a siding look like a real siding?
    Yes. I have a track on one of my Free-moN modules that qualifies. It's the lead to an industrial peninsula. Running it by itself, it works nicely. Running it with the industrial peninsula connected has turned out to be problematic.... however, the problem isn't actually the rock and roll nature of the track. The problem is that there isn't enough straight track at the end where the industrial peninsula connects.... I"m going to have to re-lay the track, but since that is all hand laid track, I'm going to try to unsolder the rail and straighten the last 2-3" before the industrial peninsula. I think that should be enough that I can get 4 axle road switchers through it. (I will be happy if I can get a GP7 to run on it reliably....)

    Paul

  3. The Following User Says Thank You to pbender For This Useful Post:


  4. #3
    Join Date
    May 2016
    Posts
    2,044
    Blog Entries
    2
    Thanks
    779
    Thanked 2,318 Times in 776 Posts
    Mentioned
    68 Post(s)
    Tagged
    1 Thread(s)

    Default

    Would love to see pics of such trackage!

    Quote Originally Posted by pbender View Post
    Yes. I have a track on one of my Free-moN modules that qualifies. It's the lead to an industrial peninsula. Running it by itself, it works nicely. Running it with the industrial peninsula connected has turned out to be problematic.... however, the problem isn't actually the rock and roll nature of the track. The problem is that there isn't enough straight track at the end where the industrial peninsula connects.... I"m going to have to re-lay the track, but since that is all hand laid track, I'm going to try to unsolder the rail and straighten the last 2-3" before the industrial peninsula. I think that should be enough that I can get 4 axle road switchers through it. (I will be happy if I can get a GP7 to run on it reliably....)

    Paul

  5. #4
    Join Date
    Jan 2014
    Location
    Fort Smith, Arkansas
    Posts
    1,335
    Thanks
    1,165
    Thanked 1,721 Times in 592 Posts
    Mentioned
    21 Post(s)
    Tagged
    0 Thread(s)

    Default

    Got 3-4 on my small layout.
    Daniel Dawson

  6. #5
    Join Date
    Nov 2011
    Location
    Hermitage, PA
    Posts
    946
    Blog Entries
    1
    Thanks
    670
    Thanked 973 Times in 371 Posts
    Mentioned
    19 Post(s)
    Tagged
    2 Thread(s)

    Default

    @ChrisKLAS beat up some of his siding track to replicate that swaying motion on his Techapi Pass layout, works really well too. The link will take you to page 29 where he shows what it looks like.
    Last edited by Celidude; 18th Jul 2016 at 01:57 PM.
    Tim

    Shoot for the stars, anything less and your selling yourself short...

    B&LE SD18 project
    B&LE 200: The Merry Widow
    B&LE SD38AC build
    D&H #17 project
    Resin T-1 build

  7. #6
    Join Date
    Dec 2003
    Location
    Columbus,OH, USA
    Posts
    3,261
    Thanks
    79
    Thanked 1,571 Times in 912 Posts
    Mentioned
    44 Post(s)
    Tagged
    0 Thread(s)

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by P-LineSoo View Post
    Would love to see pics of such trackage!
    This is the best I have available right now:


    The track on the right, with the dirt around it.

    Paul

  8. The Following User Says Thank You to pbender For This Useful Post:


  9. #7
    Join Date
    May 2016
    Posts
    2,044
    Blog Entries
    2
    Thanks
    779
    Thanked 2,318 Times in 776 Posts
    Mentioned
    68 Post(s)
    Tagged
    1 Thread(s)

    Default

    Celidude, those bowed rails look great!

    I also like the way this siding has been 'scenicked'. (for lack of a better term. Is that a word, 'scenicked'? LOL)

    IMG_2775.JPG

  10. The Following 6 Users Say Thank You to P-LineSoo For This Useful Post:


  11. #8
    Join Date
    Nov 2006
    Location
    Los Angeles, CA, USA
    Posts
    2,998
    Thanks
    1,276
    Thanked 2,854 Times in 1,001 Posts
    Mentioned
    34 Post(s)
    Tagged
    0 Thread(s)

    Default

    If you're using flextrack, I would recommend, before installing the track, flip the track upside down, removing one or two ties, and using an Xacto to remove some of the plastic connecting the ties, and manually space and align the ties when you're laying the track down. That way, the tie spacing and alignment won't look as perfect, and it will represent both neglect and a lower budget associated with laying down a spur track. Also, use lighter colors to weather ties individually, including some thinned white or light grey acrylics.

    If you're really daring, use a small hammer to deform the raiis (not too hard, the subtler the better) so you can get the side to side sway movement when running your trains on it.

    Metro Red Ln (Metro Red Line)
    Under the streets of Los Angeles

  12. The Following 2 Users Say Thank You to MetroRedLn For This Useful Post:


  13. #9
    Join Date
    Feb 2014
    Location
    Chicagoland, IL, USA
    Posts
    1,626
    Thanks
    2,835
    Thanked 2,022 Times in 842 Posts
    Mentioned
    41 Post(s)
    Tagged
    0 Thread(s)

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by P-LineSoo View Post
    Is that a word, 'scenicked'?
    It is here.

    I have done some weeds, the main thing to ask yourself is whether you want to leave it operational or not. Too much and you may put an end to using the siding. I've used some silifllor tufts that did a really good job of grabbing trip pins on couplers or holding the car up on the axle. Put all the weeds you want below the rail head and keep a flange way open like you would for street track, but be wary of getting it as bad as real track can be. Part of the problem is just the materials we use. They're often too stiff and are relying on a little glue rather than a root system to hold them in place and they won't grow back if damaged.

    Here's about the best picture I have (that's not saying much)



    To get the neglected look, I believe you really need to hand lay the rail and use wood ties (not as hard as it seems). Then you can rough em up a bit, set a few off kilter, etc. To avoid the "highball look", the best you can do is use code 40 rail. Even that is a bit large for long neglected spurs and sidings. That's roughly 120lb rail in N scale. Using C40 then begs the question of whether that is operational rail again. Some equipment may not like that due to wheel flange sizes.

    And I wish I could do beautiful ballast!
    Creating new towns out of thin air.
    My build thread, the Aylesbury Branch

  14. The Following User Says Thank You to jimil For This Useful Post:


  15. #10
    Join Date
    Nov 2006
    Location
    Los Angeles, CA, USA
    Posts
    2,998
    Thanks
    1,276
    Thanked 2,854 Times in 1,001 Posts
    Mentioned
    34 Post(s)
    Tagged
    0 Thread(s)

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by jimil View Post
    It is here.

    I have done some weeds, the main thing to ask yourself is whether you want to leave it operational or not. Too much and you may put an end to using the siding.!
    Yeah, keep in mind that 1:1 scale weeds and bushes might be flexible enough to survive being run over by an occasional railcar every week or so, but your 1:160 weeds might stop a loco literally dead in its tracks.

    Metro Red Ln (Metro Red Line)
    Under the streets of Los Angeles

  16. #11
    Join Date
    Jan 2015
    Location
    Florida, USA
    Posts
    879
    Thanks
    199
    Thanked 1,144 Times in 379 Posts
    Mentioned
    38 Post(s)
    Tagged
    0 Thread(s)

    Default

    HO, but...
    Did someone say whitcomb?

  17. The Following 4 Users Say Thank You to Intermodalman For This Useful Post:


  18. #12
    Join Date
    Jan 2014
    Location
    Fort Smith, Arkansas
    Posts
    1,335
    Thanks
    1,165
    Thanked 1,721 Times in 592 Posts
    Mentioned
    21 Post(s)
    Tagged
    0 Thread(s)

    Default

    20160718_204434.jpg20160718_204528.jpg

    A better camera would help, but here are some aerials of mine.
    Daniel Dawson

  19. #13
    Join Date
    May 2016
    Posts
    2,044
    Blog Entries
    2
    Thanks
    779
    Thanked 2,318 Times in 776 Posts
    Mentioned
    68 Post(s)
    Tagged
    1 Thread(s)

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by jimil View Post
    It is here.

    I have done some weeds, the main thing to ask yourself is whether you want to leave it operational or not. Too much and you may put an end to using the siding. I've used some silifllor tufts that did a really good job of grabbing trip pins on couplers or holding the car up on the axle. Put all the weeds you want below the rail head and keep a flange way open like you would for street track, but be wary of getting it as bad as real track can be. Part of the problem is just the materials we use. They're often too stiff and are relying on a little glue rather than a root system to hold them in place and they won't grow back if damaged.

    Here's about the best picture I have (that's not saying much)

    https://c1.staticflickr.com/6/5798/2...251ec1a7_z.jpg

    To get the neglected look, I believe you really need to hand lay the rail and use wood ties (not as hard as it seems). Then you can rough em up a bit, set a few off kilter, etc. To avoid the "highball look", the best you can do is use code 40 rail. Even that is a bit large for long neglected spurs and sidings. That's roughly 120lb rail in N scale. Using C40 then begs the question of whether that is operational rail again. Some equipment may not like that due to wheel flange sizes.

    And I wish I could do beautiful ballast!
    I think you've done a beautiful job. It captures the siding look and is operational. Mission accomplished.

  20. #14
    Join Date
    May 2016
    Posts
    2,044
    Blog Entries
    2
    Thanks
    779
    Thanked 2,318 Times in 776 Posts
    Mentioned
    68 Post(s)
    Tagged
    1 Thread(s)

    Default

    Wow, this is great stuff, everyone! The HO video was really good. Looks like pretty much the whole Fox Valley in Wisconsin...

  21. #15
    Join Date
    May 2012
    Location
    Nebraska
    Posts
    4,878
    Thanks
    6,759
    Thanked 8,431 Times in 2,738 Posts
    Mentioned
    175 Post(s)
    Tagged
    2 Thread(s)

    Default

    Here's a link to my blog page that shows more of the siding you commented about on Chris Klas's thread and the one you re-posted above.

    http://thelittlerockline.blogspot.co...sheep-out.html

    At the bottom is a video of one of the other sidings in Malvern.
    At the time I only covered them in weeds but haven't gone back and dimpled the track yet to make the cars and locos rock n roll.
    The Little Rock Line blog


    “Never argue with an idiot. They will only bring you down to their level and beat you with experience." George Carlin

  22. The Following User Says Thank You to Allen H. For This Useful Post:


  23. #16
    Join Date
    May 2016
    Posts
    2,044
    Blog Entries
    2
    Thanks
    779
    Thanked 2,318 Times in 776 Posts
    Mentioned
    68 Post(s)
    Tagged
    1 Thread(s)

    Default

    I guess this is the kind of stuff you never see in MR.

    I'm very pleasantly surprised to see that so many people have strived for the 'neglected siding' realism. Now I have some great ideas on how to proceed with my layout.

  24. #17
    Join Date
    May 2010
    Posts
    10,353
    Thanks
    1,403
    Thanked 7,567 Times in 4,403 Posts
    Mentioned
    258 Post(s)
    Tagged
    1 Thread(s)

    Default

    You don't need to start with flex track or hand lay the rails...
    image.jpg
    The rear track has a Kato bumper thinned to Tomix height. The front track is Tomix. The ground foam runs right up to the sides of the ties. Lots of dark washes were applied to the ballast, making it look very dirty. Some ground foam could be sprinkled between the rails.

    Use a dark brown rust paint on the rails. Orangey rust is on new rails. Thankfully for us modelers the tops of the rail are hardened by use and take a lot longer to rust. The bumpers were first painted yellow then rusted.

    Totally abandoned rails would have the tops rusted too. That conductive paint might allow a loco to run on it at a much slower speed. DO NOT USE RESISTANCE PAINT! The stuff for your signaling axles. It heats up as current passes through it.
    Use what you know about the world to model…
    Learn from modeling what you don't know about the real world.



  25. #18
    Join Date
    Mar 2012
    Location
    Pinehurst, Texas, USA
    Posts
    534
    Thanks
    1,066
    Thanked 1,235 Times in 292 Posts
    Mentioned
    5 Post(s)
    Tagged
    0 Thread(s)

    Default

    I did some on a small diorama that I built for taking pictures of rolling stock outside in the natural sunlight.





    Jeff


  26. The Following 5 Users Say Thank You to TexasJeff For This Useful Post:


  27. #19
    Join Date
    Jul 2005
    Location
    Taxachusetts, New England
    Posts
    994
    Blog Entries
    18
    Thanks
    443
    Thanked 1,810 Times in 487 Posts
    Mentioned
    20 Post(s)
    Tagged
    0 Thread(s)

    Default

    I never understood why people never use "stick rail" on their layouts, especially when they model older railroads. An old siding will 99% of the time have stick rail, and often with smaller sections of rail here and there.
    www.newenglanddepot.net
    But... what if I don't WANT to weather it? Hmmmmmm??

  28. #20
    Join Date
    Jan 2016
    Location
    Co kildare, Ireland
    Posts
    8
    Thanks
    0
    Thanked 5 Times in 2 Posts
    Mentioned
    0 Post(s)
    Tagged
    0 Thread(s)

    Default

    Here's another suggestion, an abandoned engine depot which would have been common in the transition era and well into the 60's. Pull the rails away from the sleepers and glue them the sleepers to the baseboard, then cover them with static grass. It was common for railroads to save the rails and leave the ties in place. Then draw a circle and cover it with spent ballast representing the spot where the railroad recovered the turntable and filled in the hole left afterwards. To finish off the scene you could weather a small roundhouse with the grass covered ties entering through rotting doors. I have a small area of my layout which i can do little with and this will be a good filler for that.
    Brian deasy

  29. The Following 3 Users Say Thank You to Tuby For This Useful Post:


Similar Threads

  1. Replies: 4
    Last Post: 30th Jun 2015, 03:57 AM
  2. Don't neglect the neglected!
    By WidowCreek in forum Photography/Videography (Techniques & Equipment)
    Replies: 5
    Last Post: 30th Dec 2011, 02:54 PM
  3. Trackage mess!
    By ThirdCoastRail in forum Trackage
    Replies: 14
    Last Post: 2nd Apr 2011, 02:07 AM
  4. Trackage systems?
    By Danmanlott in forum Trackage
    Replies: 6
    Last Post: 18th Feb 2011, 02:03 PM
  5. trackage for my layout
    By absnut in forum Trackage
    Replies: 11
    Last Post: 15th Feb 2008, 03:28 AM

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •