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Thread: Starting a new module - a modest interchange.

  1. #21
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    Okay, two more update pictures with the cork glued down and some more detail filled in including the shape of the road/parking lot and the wind of the creek. I have an idea about where the banks will start, and I also plan on adding some gentle slope above the surface plane in a couple spots.



    Here's one top down, you can see my scrawls a bit better:


    I am hoping that tomorrow or Monday my daughter and I can start cutting into the foam to give it some rough shape.

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  3. #22
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    Sounds good! I really like your meandering creek and think it will be an excellent feature enlivening the scene.

    Cheers!
    Gordon

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    This will be a great looking feature, cant wait to see it progress!

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    Here's one picture showing some progress. My daughter starting to carve the creek into the foam board. This will take a few laps. I need to get a wide enough slice in order to get the foam cutter into it.


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  7. #25
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    Another update, the landforms are really beginning to show, and the hot knife combined with the hot wire cutter worked much better than expected. After slicing the center of the creek with the hot knife, I then traced out the banks with a sharpie and did the same thing with the hot knife. In this case, I think the hot knife softened the glue holding the insulation to the wood below because it popped up easily, leaving the shape of the stream right down to the wood. This is how it looked after those cuts:



    I then used a jigsaw to cut some contours in the front and back of the module to create slopes entering and leaving the space, and then a hot wire cutter to add some shape. The hot wire work isn't quite done, but this is how it looks now:





    I really want this module to have some subtle contours as the Canadian prairies, particularly around creeks and rivers aren't that flat.

    I still have more to cut with the hot wire cutter as I continue to sculpt the terrain. Eventually this is going to get covered in plaster cloth since I have a roll I bought 8 years ago that I have never used

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  9. #26
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    Good to see you decided to add the siding with the industry off the interchange track. So now you can store four or five cars on the interchange track plus the cars on the industry siding. I think you will like the operational capacity even though it may be empty from time to time.

    I cannot comment on the creak as I live in a dessert valley and our creaks are dry sandy washes until snow melts or rain is excessive. I am sure you have a picture in mind of what you are working toward. In my area there are many simple corrugated culverts to allow water by to preserve the roadbed.
    John

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    Quote Originally Posted by jhn_plsn View Post
    n my area there are many simple corrugated culverts to allow water by to preserve the roadbed.
    Alternately, you could look at a more elaborate wooden/concrete culvert - take a look at the CPR Historical Site's Document's Library for standard CPR Plans (registration is required but it is free) http://www.cptracks.ca/cpdocs/main.asp

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    Here's the installation of the culvert. Ultimately I decided to go with the plaster casting of the Masonry culvert from Woodland Scenics as it was about the right size for what I was planning to do. I really like that CPR site, looking through the construction of culverts. I debated constructing one out of plasticard, but ultimately perhaps expediency won out, plus I liked the look of the masonry one.

    The first thing I did was to slice out the section where the culvert would go, and glued the two culvert arches to either end after flattening them out. In this case I used a boxcutter-style knife rather than the hot knife or hot wire cutter:


    What I didn't take a picture of was the next step. I used the hot wire cutter to carve out a tunnel using the culvert arch as a guide. I felt I still needed a reasonable amount of foam for this piece in order to glue it back in, and the arch would afford that. I then glued it back into place, and added the retaining walls. It looks like when I add the plaster cloth, I'll need to take a bit of hydrocal to fill in the gaps. Not a big problem, but here's how it looks with everything glued back in:



    A couple of broader shots showing the module as it stands now. The elevator won't be glued down for transport purposes, but I have glued down three guides to make sure it is position right on the table:


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  13. #29
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    I moved the module out of my garage and into the basement to start adding the plaster cloth. This is my first time using the stuff, so here's some progress pictures of it:



    And after a bit more work, this is how it was last night when I decided to call it:


    The plaster cloth certainly works, but there still remains the regular pattern of the gauze that is still visible even when I smooth the plaster out with my fingers or a wet brush. I have an idea for doing some textured ground cover over the plaster cloth, but I won't make a decision on that until the rest of the cloth is down. Hopefully more pictures to follow shortly.

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    Rather than plaster cloth, have you thought about using ground goop? It has a plaster base so it dries hard and provides texture without fighting the imperfections of the plaster mesh.

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    I'm not familiar with ground goop. In this case, I wanted to experiment with the plaster cloth on a module since I had a spare roll anyway. I am familiar with a technique of using drywall mud and paper towels. Is that what you mean by ground goop? I'd be happy to hear.

    My ground cover idea is to use both sanded and non-sanded grout to provide some texture. I experimented a bit with some sanded grout and pigment that is sprinkled onto a surface that is tacked in place with a water/glue mixture, and then sprayed with water to activate the grout.

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    Quote Originally Posted by Agatheron View Post
    I'm not familiar with ground goop. In this case, I wanted to experiment with the plaster cloth on a module since I had a spare roll anyway. I am familiar with a technique of using drywall mud and paper towels. Is that what you mean by ground goop? I'd be happy to hear.

    My ground cover idea is to use both sanded and non-sanded grout to provide some texture. I experimented a bit with some sanded grout and pigment that is sprinkled onto a surface that is tacked in place with a water/glue mixture, and then sprayed with water to activate the grout.
    Here is the formula for ground goop. Basically, takes the place of plaster cloth and zip texture which you describe above. Many different ways to skin the cat, so just throwing this out as what has worked for me but many different paths to get to the same goal.

    http://model-railroad-hobbyist.com/node/6816

    A pic how it looks when it is wet and when it dries. Lesson learned is to put down a dirt layer when it was wet which I didn't do but it saves a step. Biggest thing with ground goop is to smooth is out a bit more (unlike what I didn't do) to avoid some sharp, very hard edges when it dries.





    Regardless of the method, your module is coming along very nicely. Keep the updates coming.

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    You used that with Kato Unitrack, right? My home layout is going to be a mostly Unitrack one. This is good to know.

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    Quote Originally Posted by Agatheron View Post
    You used that with Kato Unitrack, right? My home layout is going to be a mostly Unitrack one. This is good to know.
    That is correct. Another nice thing about the ground goop you can knock down some of the height of the plastic ballast. Also I found that you don't have to glue the track in place either. Once the goop sets that track ain't going nowhere outside of the taking a 5 pound "persuader" to it.

  20. #35
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    Thanks. No new pictures, but I finished the plaster cloth last night. I still had some left over which I may use to fill in some gaps here and there. I just need to case a small handful of rocks and maybe get my hands on some scupltamold to "edit" the shapes in a few places.

    Once the rocks are on, I think it's time to solder and glue the track. That's not one of my strong points, so it will be a learning experience!

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    New update with some pictures. I've now laid down some track:


    If you look carefully, the crossing closest to the bottom of the picture (and the front of the module) is a little out of alignment with the center of the cork. I pulled it up, clipped about 4mm off of the connecting track, and secured it back on. I then weighed them down with a pair of mini-sledgehammers. Hopefully it will be dry tomorrow before I move on to the other pieces of track. Once it is all glued, I'll then solder it, wire it, and then on to painting and landscaping.

    Also, it's now time to paint the grain elevator. Here's a few shots of it moments before I primed it black:




    The extra silo is not currently attached so I can paint it, but eventually it will all be connected together:


    The elevator is a kitbash/semi-scratchbuild using the Walther's Grain Elevator kit, and Rix's Guthrie Grain. If you're really perceptive, you might notice the blue Rolaids jar lid forming the concrete base of the steel silo. The side part of the elevator used the warehouse that came with the grain elevator as a base, but I extended the height of it, and the sheathed it all in v-groove siding that matched the Walther's kit. I'm going to post most of my progress on it over in the Structures section.

    While it's not apparent in the picture, I also treated the bottom of the creek with a few layers of thinned-down Modge-Podge to give me a smooth surface to start working with.

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  23. #37
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    Just getting caught up on this thread. Very nice. Looking forward to your continued progress.

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    As I stated in another post......I'm in awe at how well you did on the elevator! This is going to be a very nice module!

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    This is a really effective kitbash. You're making me want to get to work on my mine structures! I will have a coal mine (on top of the helix) and a sand/silica mine (beside the helix) that both will want to look unique, though they may be very much based on Walthers kits (New River Mine and others). You've done a great job of capturing the essence of your prototype, and you had good photos to work from. Will you be displaying any of those photos along with this module, perhaps clipped to the fascia? I think the viewing public would enjoy seeing the fidelity.

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    I've put down more track, but no pictures just yet. Today was doing the first stage of painting the grain elevator. I'll post a more detailed description of how I did this and what I am up to with this over in the Structures forum, but here's how it currently looks:





    This isn't what it's going to look like on the module. Rather, this is the undercoat that will be partly exposed via chipping. I'm going to be using the "hairspray" technique to give the paint a worn/chipped look.

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