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Thread: What Camera Do You Use?

  1. #41
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    There's a Lumix with built-in focus stacking but I doubt that its easy to use and I know it isn't cheap. Have you tried a cell phone?

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    Using a Moto G today. Am not on the cloud and emailing from my phone to pc is getting old. Isn't there something around $300 with wifi, video and decent image quality? The size of the Lumix and A6000 appear handy. Suppose I could get a tablet if the technology of my phone is equal to a dedicated camera. Maybe I just need a tripod mount for the phone.

    Not really sure what Stacking is... heard it mentions here a few times. Is this an attempt to improve the image quality to compete with a DSLR?

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    Taking pictures of small things up close shortens the depth of field of a photo pretty significantly, causing only a small portion of an image will be in focus, the rest will be blurry. Focus stacking solves this problem by taking the exact same picture multiple times, but at a different focal length each time, so a different part of the subject will be in focus in each image. Then you bring in focus stacking software, which harvests the in-focus parts of all the images and stitches them together to make one totally in-focus image.

    For example:

    Notice how in this raw image, the GP38 in the background is in focus, while the GP60 in the foreground is not. https://i.imgur.com/cpRgg3K.jpg

    Now after focus stacking, both locomotives are (mostly) in focus. https://i.imgur.com/fkne4ci.jpg

    I'm sure a nice camera with a built-in feature could do it more cleanly than my fumbling with the touchscreen on my phone trying to get it to focus on different areas while moving as little as possible at the same time.

    I was curious so I did a bit of quick research and this is the cheapest unit I came across that could do focus stacking. https://shop.panasonic.com/cameras-a...ver&Quantity=1 It's pretty pricey (that's more than I paid for my smartphone!) but if the focus stacking feature works well I could see it being worthwhile for our purposes.
    Last edited by dwwojcik; 6th Sep 2019 at 01:10 AM.

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    Quote Originally Posted by dwwojcik View Post
    Notice how in this raw image, the GP38 in the background is in focus, while the GP60 in the foreground is not.
    That's a great example... what a difference! I noticed the "multiple" grab rails on the GP60 and was going to ask about use of a tripod, but you answered it later in your post. I haven't used focus stacking software yet, but would think that a tripod is all that photo needs to make it perfect. My son picked up an iPhone bracket for smartphone use on a tripod, shouldn't be that hard to do when you're taking the time to setup a really nice photo.

    Paul

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    I use a Cannon EOS T4 digital SLR. I put this on a tripod and crank the aperture as small as it will go. This seems to do pretty well without bothering with focus stacking.
    Tim Rumph
    Modeling the Southern Railway in N-Scale

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    Quote Originally Posted by Tim R View Post
    I use a Cannon EOS T4 digital SLR. I put this on a tripod and crank the aperture as small as it will go. This seems to do pretty well without bothering with focus stacking.
    This is exactly what I do with my Sony A100 DSLR -- old school, Baby!!

    Wolf

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    If you don't have a Digital SLR ( which is your best bet ), but you have a phone you can get copy of Helicon Focus lite software with a lifetime license for $115.
    I just picked up a copy the other day and love it. Simple to use, it's a nice option for both camera types.

    Phone, tripod, Tripod mount and software, you can get this:


    The Little Rock Line blog


    “Never argue with an idiot. They will only bring you down to their level and beat you with experience." George Carlin

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    Solved my initial problem by getting a usb cable for the phone to the pc. Not sure why the virtual router installed on the pc wouldn't talk nice to the phone?

    Quote Originally Posted by dwwojcik View Post
    Taking pictures of small things up close shortens the depth of field of a photo pretty significantly, causing only a small portion of an image will be in focus, the rest will be blurry. Focus stacking solves this problem by taking the exact same picture multiple times, but at a different focal length each time, so a different part of the subject will be in focus in each image. Then you bring in focus stacking software, which harvests the in-focus parts of all the images and stitches them together to make one totally in-focus image.
    Your explanation makes sense thxs for posting the examples. As a feature on the camera it is an automated program...or a manually programmed option correct? I've started looking at some entry level Canon DSLRs that have a Focus Bracketing operation which sounds very similar to focus stacking. Maybe most new cameras have a comparable feature. Old school meets New school hopefully.

    Finally realized while I like the small form factor units the tiny buttons/controls and menus keep me from using my cameras in the past. Also realized that I was using ISO incorrectly in the past. What physical part of the camera changes with different ISO settings? I believe a higher setting makes the image lighter but with more grain. But what is actually changing?

    So what are everyone's thoughts on which Canon DSLR for under $500...including at least one decent lense. Any reason not to by refurbished from the Canon store? What other accessories am I forgetting about beside an extra battery and a charger?

    @Allen
    First you have to have "that", then you can have "this".

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    Quote Originally Posted by Rook View Post
    Your explanation makes sense thxs for posting the examples. As a feature on the camera it is an automated program...or a manually programmed option correct? I've started looking at some entry level Canon DSLRs that have a Focus Bracketing operation which sounds very similar to focus stacking. Maybe most new cameras have a comparable feature. Old school meets New school hopefully.
    Focus bracketing is only half of focus stacking. Focus bracketing automatically takes the pictures with different focal lengths, but you still have to do the actual stacking with something else, unlike with the fancy new Panasonics. I actually found an app for my phone that can do focus bracketing today, which is how I know, although I have yet to try it properly. Unfortunately I don't have the layout any more so I can't recreate my previous attempt.

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