Page 2 of 4 FirstFirst 1234 LastLast
Results 21 to 40 of 65

Thread: Help with soldering SMD's

  1. #21
    Join Date
    Aug 2016
    Location
    New York State
    Posts
    3,441
    Blog Entries
    4
    Thanks
    4,741
    Thanked 4,713 Times in 1,629 Posts
    Mentioned
    155 Post(s)
    Tagged
    0 Thread(s)

    Default

    Doug,

    Is this the one you are talking about?

    https://iso-tip.com/product/60-pro-c...kit-boxed-7800
    Cheers Tony

    "Knowing what to do is one thing ... being able to do it is another"
    "It is easy to criticize ... a lot harder when you have to justify it"

  2. #22
    Join Date
    Nov 2012
    Location
    Lancaster, SC
    Posts
    784
    Blog Entries
    4
    Thanks
    341
    Thanked 1,053 Times in 452 Posts
    Mentioned
    29 Post(s)
    Tagged
    0 Thread(s)

    Default

    I've got the LED and wire soldering tool from Ngineering. https://www.ngineering.com/other_cool_tools.htm

    It's down the page a bit. Works well and there's a link to instructions on the listing.
    Tim Rumph
    Modeling the Southern Railway in N-Scale

  3. The Following User Says Thank You to Tim R For This Useful Post:


  4. #23
    Join Date
    Aug 2016
    Location
    New York State
    Posts
    3,441
    Blog Entries
    4
    Thanks
    4,741
    Thanked 4,713 Times in 1,629 Posts
    Mentioned
    155 Post(s)
    Tagged
    0 Thread(s)

    Default

    Might be worth getting one of those tools. Would certainly free up the hands!
    Cheers Tony

    "Knowing what to do is one thing ... being able to do it is another"
    "It is easy to criticize ... a lot harder when you have to justify it"

  5. #24
    Join Date
    Mar 2015
    Location
    Rochester, MN USA
    Posts
    392
    Thanks
    102
    Thanked 257 Times in 151 Posts
    Mentioned
    0 Post(s)
    Tagged
    0 Thread(s)

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by wombat457 View Post
    Doug,

    Is this the one you are talking about?

    https://iso-tip.com/product/60-pro-c...kit-boxed-7800
    Yes. There are less expensive ones too but they take longer to charge. Oh, they heat quickly too, a matter of seconds.

    Doug
    Atlas First Generation Motive Power and Treble-O-Lectric. Click on the link:
    www.irwinsjournal.com/a1g/a1glocos/

  6. The Following User Says Thank You to Doug Gosha For This Useful Post:


  7. #25
    Join Date
    Mar 2015
    Location
    Rochester, MN USA
    Posts
    392
    Thanks
    102
    Thanked 257 Times in 151 Posts
    Mentioned
    0 Post(s)
    Tagged
    0 Thread(s)

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by Tim R View Post
    I've got the LED and wire soldering tool from Ngineering. https://www.ngineering.com/other_cool_tools.htm

    It's down the page a bit. Works well and there's a link to instructions on the listing.
    Yeah, that looks handy too. It beats trying to improvise with fun-tak and/or tape.

    Doug
    Atlas First Generation Motive Power and Treble-O-Lectric. Click on the link:
    www.irwinsjournal.com/a1g/a1glocos/

  8. #26
    Join Date
    Aug 2016
    Location
    New York State
    Posts
    3,441
    Blog Entries
    4
    Thanks
    4,741
    Thanked 4,713 Times in 1,629 Posts
    Mentioned
    155 Post(s)
    Tagged
    0 Thread(s)

    Default

    Just ordered one of the ISO-Tip "60" Pro Irons along with a "Fine" Soldering Tip. Will keep this for smaller jobs and my Hakko for track work etc.

    1 x “60” Pro Charge Soldering Iron Kit – Model #7800
    1 x High-Efficiency Micro Tip (#7566-100
    Cheers Tony

    "Knowing what to do is one thing ... being able to do it is another"
    "It is easy to criticize ... a lot harder when you have to justify it"

  9. The Following User Says Thank You to wombat457 For This Useful Post:

    sid

  10. #27
    Join Date
    Dec 2017
    Location
    Niagara Falls
    Posts
    211
    Thanks
    451
    Thanked 262 Times in 116 Posts
    Mentioned
    6 Post(s)
    Tagged
    0 Thread(s)

    Default

    Thanks for starting this thread Tony.

    So many good tips and information here.
    Rob

  11. The Following User Says Thank You to NiagaraRail For This Useful Post:


  12. #28
    Join Date
    Aug 2016
    Location
    New York State
    Posts
    3,441
    Blog Entries
    4
    Thanks
    4,741
    Thanked 4,713 Times in 1,629 Posts
    Mentioned
    155 Post(s)
    Tagged
    0 Thread(s)

    Default

    It has turned out that way and that is a good thing. My question/s were answered and now it is expanding to include other aspects of soldering in general. I know I have picked up some great tips and new items that will help me and, I'm sure others as well.

    One thing I have found with this hobby is there is always something new to learn, things that we all know and (perhaps) think others know as well. Sometimes what might seem obvious to you or I may not be that obvious to someone else, so posting the things we use and the way we do things is always beneficial to someone.
    Cheers Tony

    "Knowing what to do is one thing ... being able to do it is another"
    "It is easy to criticize ... a lot harder when you have to justify it"

  13. The Following 2 Users Say Thank You to wombat457 For This Useful Post:


  14. #29
    Join Date
    Aug 2016
    Location
    New York State
    Posts
    3,441
    Blog Entries
    4
    Thanks
    4,741
    Thanked 4,713 Times in 1,629 Posts
    Mentioned
    155 Post(s)
    Tagged
    0 Thread(s)

    Default

    Something I am a little confused about due to conflicting answers I have been given regarding ... "RESISTORS" ...

    I know what the basic function of a resistor is; however, what (if anything) does adding more resistors to a power wire do?

    The problem I had (months and months ago) was the same as the problem I have with the SMD LED's I recently bought, being too darn bright. What I was told was, "adding more resistors, or a larger resistor would reduce the brightness of the LED."

    That to me suggests that if I have an LED that is a "10" on some scale using a 480 ohm resistor then adding another 480 ohm resistor will reduce the brightness to say (I don't know) "6". This doesn't sound logical to me. IF it was then if I were to add 6 X 480 ohm resistors to that LED then it would not light at all, and I can't see that being the case.

    So I guess the question is ... will adding more resistors, or larger resistors, reduce the brightness of an LED?

    So moving on, if what I suspect is true - adding more resistors wont effect the brightness - how do you know what size resistor is the "correct size" for a given application?
    Cheers Tony

    "Knowing what to do is one thing ... being able to do it is another"
    "It is easy to criticize ... a lot harder when you have to justify it"

  15. #30
    Join Date
    Jan 2017
    Posts
    1,054
    Thanks
    2,694
    Thanked 1,105 Times in 559 Posts
    Mentioned
    34 Post(s)
    Tagged
    0 Thread(s)

    Default

    Tony, when we think of lighting for MRR we usually go back to our childhood days of locomotives that use an incandescent or “grain of wheat” light bulb. And we remember how at a very slow speed the headlight is barely on. If we wanted a fully lit headlight we had to run the locomotive really fast, too fast at times.

    With the light bulb, you’ll remember that it starts off with a miniscule glow as you make the locomotive move and it LINEARLY gets brighter and brighter as the locomotive gets faster because the voltage is increasing linearly.

    Fast forward to today where everything in MRR is lit with LEDs and the grain of wheat light bulb is as modern as the horse drawn carriage.

    LEDs don’t quite work that way. They work more on a constant voltage idea, unlike the light bulb where increasing the voltage increases the brightness. By keeping the voltage constant with LEDs, we can only vary the current and this is where your resistor comes into play.

    Forward voltage is something that you will see a lot with LED specs. It’s basically, in layman’s terms, the voltage that you want to the LED to see. So for example, if you have a 12V power source and the LED calls for a 2V forward voltage, then you need to somehow “get rid of” that extra 10V.

    Applying Ohm’s law, V=IR, you have 10=I*R. For LEDs, the I is typically 20 mA. This becomes 10=0.02*R which dictates a 500 Ohm resistor but they don’t make that, so a 470 Ohm is used.

    But what if you double that? Say, 1K Ohm, rounded up? Would that cut the brightness in half? After all you have just cut the 20 mA current to 10 mA, roughly. Yes and no. Yes it will cut down the brightness but not half. LEDs have a certain threshold before they are excited enough to output light. They are diodes after all. Below this threshold nothing happens. Above this threshold it comes on, but not in a dim glow like a light bulb. The range of brightness between “barely on” to full on is not as a dynamic of a range as a light bulb. You won't get the dimly glow up to full brightness like you did as a kid running your locomotive on 12V DC.

    Many people double the resistance to tame down the “OMG! It’s burning my eyeballs” effect. But the human eye/brain combo will still see the LED as very bright as your brain will compensate. So how do you adjust the brightness if it’s still way too bright? Buy the correct LED with the correct mcd rating! Just the very question you wondered about a few posts up.

    Here’s a quick reference on what forward voltage is for various LED colors. Use 20 mA as the typical current to calculate the resistor needed:


    • IR: ~1.5V
    • Red: ~2V
    • Amber: ~2V
    • Yellow: ~2V
    • Green: ~2.5V
    • Blue: ~3.5V
    • White: ~3.5V

  16. The Following 5 Users Say Thank You to kingmeow For This Useful Post:


  17. #31
    Join Date
    Feb 2015
    Location
    SE PA
    Posts
    294
    Thanks
    1,142
    Thanked 276 Times in 131 Posts
    Mentioned
    7 Post(s)
    Tagged
    0 Thread(s)

    Default

    Tony, That is correct, Resistor "restrict" or "limit" the amount of power that can pass through. So yes you can decrease the brightness by adding more resistance (either another resistor in series, or one larger resistor).
    The additional resistance has the same effect as lowing the voltage to the LED, if you lower it to much the LED will not light.

  18. #32
    Join Date
    Jan 2017
    Posts
    1,054
    Thanks
    2,694
    Thanked 1,105 Times in 559 Posts
    Mentioned
    34 Post(s)
    Tagged
    0 Thread(s)

    Default

    LEDs work on forward voltage so the resistor changes the current and not the voltage to the LED. Either way, add enough resistors and it won't light.

  19. The Following User Says Thank You to kingmeow For This Useful Post:


  20. #33
    Join Date
    Apr 2018
    Location
    MN
    Posts
    20
    Thanks
    0
    Thanked 27 Times in 8 Posts
    Mentioned
    1 Post(s)
    Tagged
    0 Thread(s)

    Default

    used to do this manually, but nowadays you can buy the LED's pre-wired . not much more of a cost to save the eyes and headaches

  21. #34
    Join Date
    Jul 2012
    Location
    TX
    Posts
    1,403
    Thanks
    717
    Thanked 3,288 Times in 773 Posts
    Mentioned
    20 Post(s)
    Tagged
    0 Thread(s)

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by kingmeow View Post
    Many people double the resistance to tame down the “OMG! It’s burning my eyeballs” effect. But the human eye/brain combo will still see the LED as very bright as your brain will compensate. So how do you adjust the brightness if it’s still way too bright? Buy the correct LED with the correct mcd rating! Just the very question you wondered about a few posts up.
    Yes all true. Now I'll just add something else for the OP.

    The other part of the equation, as far as this hobby and modeling, is how you install the LED in a given scenario. For example in a building, you may want to have it look like it's occupied with lights on. OK, so you pick an appropriate brightness or dim it down with resistors. Now you get into some more types of light management issues. You'll want to make sure that the inside of the building doesn't leak light where it's not supposed to, like the roof and outside walls. You might have to paint the inside of the building to block light with black. Then, after the black paint dies (which again blocks light) you may actually want to paint over the black paint with white, which helps get the light back out. I've done this quite a few times. there are other things but you get the point.
    Attached Images Attached Images

  22. The Following User Says Thank You to Nskale For This Useful Post:


  23. #35
    Join Date
    Mar 2011
    Location
    Windsor, Ontario, Canada
    Posts
    1,085
    Thanks
    1,665
    Thanked 2,379 Times in 604 Posts
    Mentioned
    19 Post(s)
    Tagged
    0 Thread(s)

    Default

    A friend at my club gave me one these clips. I clip the SMD into it, then hold the whole clip in my 3rd-hand clip for stability.

    http://caltestelectronics.com/ctitem...sulated/CTM-34


    CTM-34_72dpi.jpg
    Peter

    Layout Depot (share your designs with others): www.LayoutDepot.com
    My Build Thread: www.nscale.net/forums/showthread.php?28081-Green-Valley-Railway

  24. The Following User Says Thank You to pbechard For This Useful Post:


  25. #36
    Join Date
    Mar 2018
    Location
    fresno Calif USA
    Posts
    398
    Thanks
    99
    Thanked 322 Times in 152 Posts
    Mentioned
    13 Post(s)
    Tagged
    0 Thread(s)

    Default

    ive found this to be really interesting Thanks for posting. ive learned more today .

  26. #37
    Join Date
    Jan 2017
    Posts
    1,054
    Thanks
    2,694
    Thanked 1,105 Times in 559 Posts
    Mentioned
    34 Post(s)
    Tagged
    0 Thread(s)

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by Nskale View Post
    Yes all true. Now I'll just add something else for the OP.

    The other part of the equation, as far as this hobby and modeling, is how you install the LED in a given scenario. For example in a building, you may want to have it look like it's occupied with lights on. OK, so you pick an appropriate brightness or dim it down with resistors. Now you get into some more types of light management issues. You'll want to make sure that the inside of the building doesn't leak light where it's not supposed to, like the roof and outside walls. You might have to paint the inside of the building to block light with black. Then, after the black paint dies (which again blocks light) you may actually want to paint over the black paint with white, which helps get the light back out. I've done this quite a few times. there are other things but you get the point.
    So true!!!!! Many people don't realize this and by the time they do, the model is all sealed up to fix it. When in doubt, paint it again! . There's no such thing as being too dark if your goal is to prevent light leakage.

    Do a "dry run" to see where the light can potentially leak. You don't want your structure to be glowing like there's radioactive material in there.

  27. #38
    Join Date
    Dec 2009
    Location
    Lexington, KY
    Posts
    16,789
    Blog Entries
    16
    Thanks
    4,630
    Thanked 12,870 Times in 5,375 Posts
    Mentioned
    236 Post(s)
    Tagged
    0 Thread(s)

    Default

    @kingmeow and @jimbo.0455 gave pretty good layman's descriptions of how LEDs work and how to use them. I'm debating between leaving well enough alone and getting a bit wonk-ish and diving into what's really going on inside those packages.

    If y'all are interested, I have what I think might be a good explanation that includes a reference to World War Z ...
    Never mistake a guy who talks a lot for a guy who has something to say...

    CH&FR Site and Blog: http://www.chfrrailroad.net and http://blog.chfrrailroad.net
    Appalachian Railroad Technology: http://www.apprailtech.com


  28. #39
    Join Date
    Jan 2017
    Posts
    1,054
    Thanks
    2,694
    Thanked 1,105 Times in 559 Posts
    Mentioned
    34 Post(s)
    Tagged
    0 Thread(s)

    Default

    My advice to anyone who wants to dabble in this either to experiment or learn, to just go ahead and do it. These things don't cost too much money so you can get a bunch of different value resistors, a bunch of different types of LEDs (get the normal 3mm or 5mm ones with leads so you don't have to deal with the tinyness of SMDs) and heat up your solder iron and try things out. Since you are doing it "out in the open" and not in a structure or locomotive, at most you get a puff of smoke but mostly likely just a burned out LED since a few mA is not going to do much. $10 on eBay should get you an assortment to play with.

  29. #40
    Join Date
    Jun 2014
    Posts
    651
    Thanks
    97
    Thanked 645 Times in 321 Posts
    Mentioned
    20 Post(s)
    Tagged
    0 Thread(s)

    Default

    yep buy a bunch of LEDs and resistors, tinker and test.
    get resistors from 200 up to 1k in about 100 ohm increments
    and maybe 1440 and 2k. ... 1/8 watt should be good for n-scale LEDs.


    in general as the track voltage goes up the resistor values should go up.


    I am writing the rest of this sos yall know I have some idea of what I am talking about...
    hohohohohohohoho (I crack me up)
    I have learned one reason to add a resistor to the led is because they do not have a resistance of their own...
    that means that an LED can get into a runaway failure. A resistor does the opposite (this is not completely accurate.)
    so with a resistor you have a self correcting circuit. ( or at least one that will be more self stable)


    the quick way to say that is always add a resistor to an LED.
    the other couple of things to do are add a reverse diode to the back of the LED
    and If you have space, add a capacitor across the LED/reverse diode.


    that is my standard If I can fit it into a loco headlamp circuit


    my favorite head lamp diode is now discontinued.
    The tiny little chip had the reverse diode built-in.
    when I want a lamp that is not directional, I use a different chip led.


    victor

Similar Threads

  1. Soldering
    By Phill91 in forum General Wiring
    Replies: 15
    Last Post: 5th Jun 2015, 02:06 AM
  2. Soldering Code 55
    By NickP in forum General Wiring
    Replies: 35
    Last Post: 11th Mar 2014, 07:16 PM
  3. Wiring without Soldering? Can it be done?
    By 69Z28 in forum General Wiring
    Replies: 15
    Last Post: 22nd Jan 2012, 04:10 AM
  4. Instead of soldering....
    By macrailer in forum General Rail Discussion
    Replies: 12
    Last Post: 1st May 2010, 12:03 AM
  5. Soldering paste
    By tommann in forum Modeling Techniques
    Replies: 0
    Last Post: 11th Dec 2007, 09:15 PM

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •