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Thread: Ash Dump Question.

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    Default Ash Dump Question.

    I am hoping someone on here with more knowledge may be able to help me. I found this picture on the internet and I think this picture is taken of the ash pit. I can't figure out what the metal funnel was used for that is connected to the smoke stack. My best guess is that it helped catch hot embers during the ash dump procedure.

    Thanks
    Robert


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    There seems to be water coming out, so I'm thinking this is some form of a "blowdown" procedure. They are pushing high pressure water through the boiler to remove scale and sediment and the tube directs it into a hopper. The water will leak out, leaving a hopper full of sediment.

    I can't say I've ever seen a locomotive that does a blow out through the stack though, most seem to do it out the sides.
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    Leo Bicknell

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    Thanks Leo that does make sense of the picture.

    Robert

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    Quote Originally Posted by NtheBasement View Post
    Top as opposed to bottom blowdown from referenced article:
    Surface blowdown is removed from the steam drum at the top of the boiler and Bottom blowdown is removed from the mud drum at the bottom of the boiler.

    I have seen surface blowdown very rarely in the process industries, I would assume it would have to do more with poor water quality than anything else I could think of for locomotives.
    Andy C.,
    Southern Pine Rail Operations, Back in Cypress TEXAS

    My build thread: http://www.nscale.net/forums/showthr...706#post476706

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    A boiler blowdown is always from the lowest point of the boiler. This is because the sediments and impurities settle in the bottom of the boiler.
    Blowdown in progress
    https://www.google.com.au/search?rlz...NL4GziNB2sWLM:
    https://farm5.staticflickr.com/4619/...9ea63e0e_o.jpg
    The tubes entering the smokebox are not carrying boiler water but rather the combustion gasses and cinders, small particles of burnt fuel, usually either wood or coal.
    I suspect this is some sort of cinder extraction from the smokebox, possibly from what's known as 'Sanding the Flues'. This is when the smokebox blower is on full while the engine is stationary, creating a vacuum and strong airflow entering the firebox and exiting the stack. A shovel of sand is held at the firebox door and suctioned off the shovel, through the tubes and out the stack. It has a similar effect to sand blasting in that it removes carbon buildup in the tubes that reduce heat transfer to the boilerwater. This is most common on oil fired engines but coal fired engines get the same treatment, depending on the coal quality. The tubing is, I think an alternative to having gritty, dirty outfall over the area and surrounding neighborhood, the cinder outfall creating a slightly blurred image looking like water.

    I hope I've made sense in my explanation...
    Cheers,

    Russ

    CEO of Devil's Gate Mining Co.



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    I searched for "Sanding the Flues" on google images, and this was one of the first that popped up! Ha!

    Original article: http://www.trainboard.com/highball/i...cility.129202/

    C&O was all coal burning, but probably used a lot of water taken directly from the Ohio without treatment or with minimal treatment in the early days.

    So yeah, I think Russ nailed it. Never seen pictures like this before though.
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    Being 3rd generation railroad and a dad and grand-dad both drivers (engineers) tends to rub off sometimes

    Never seen a contraption like that ductwork, and there's 2 of them there. but most times when the fireman sanded the flues, the train was moving (the cylinder exhaust producing the draft) and in open countryside.
    http://www.steamscenes-cadeco.co.uk/..._australia.htm
    Last edited by mosslake; 1st Feb 2019 at 11:43 PM. Reason: spelling
    Cheers,

    Russ

    CEO of Devil's Gate Mining Co.



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    Thanks for the great information Russ.

    Robert

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    Maybe JEdgar knows? Wish he was around more...
    www.newenglanddepot.net
    But... what if I don't WANT to weather it? Hmmmmmm??

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    I shared the photo with the C&O section of a 1:1 forum... let's see whahappa:

    http://www.railroad.net/forums/viewt...169163&start=0
    www.newenglanddepot.net
    But... what if I don't WANT to weather it? Hmmmmmm??

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    I can add a couple more guesses. The firebox draw is amped up by shooting steam out the stack, which draws air from the firebox out with it. So... they could be drawing ash out of the boiler tubes. They could also be burning out the last of the coal and cooling everything down prior to taking the loco into the roundhouse for maintenance; if they needed to chip out the cinders they wouldn't just close the draft and leave unburned coal in there.

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    In Tony Koester's Book Steam & Diesel Locomotive Servicing Terminals
    By Tony Koester
    This is described as mechanism to control smoke and cinders
    see:
    https://books.google.ca/books?id=wn9...rminal&f=false



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