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Thread: Big Boy #4014 got fired up!

  1. #81
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  2. #82
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    And, I would think concrete ties might have a tendency to be cracked by the pounding, whereas wooden ties would just absorb it.

    Doug
    Atlas First Generation Motive Power and Treble-O-Lectric. Click on the link:
    www.irwinsjournal.com/a1g/a1glocos/

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  4. #83
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    Quote Originally Posted by Scotian_Huntress View Post
    yep. wrong word for the plate under the rail.

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    Quote Originally Posted by Doug Gosha View Post
    And, I would think concrete ties might have a tendency to be cracked by the pounding, whereas wooden ties would just absorb it.

    Doug
    I have read conflicting reports about concrete railroad ties.

    one large railroad had a bunch crack a few months after the railroad installed the ties.
    ( this was a more than 10 years ago and the article was light on ahem concrete details...)
    the manufacturer blamed the failures on the railroad's botched installation.
    Of course the railroad stated the ties were poorly made and did not meet agreed specs.

    from reading about Japanese and euro-zone high speed trains, I have the impression the Japanese prefer concrete
    and rubber pads under the rails... my memory is that article called them rubber fish plates... (dunno... bad memory or writing.)
    the French TGV people had not been able to decide what was better but the transitions from wood to concrete were a problem.
    I do not recall the why, and that I was not satisfied with that article.

    I read the British used rock chairs for their earlier railroads. that is a lot like concrete.
    I also read the Americans used wood ties because suitable rock was both expensive and difficult to locate.
    and I do not know if the British stayed with rock chairs or moved over to wooden ties.

    properly done, I can think concrete ties would be serviceable. there is a question afoot
    concerning both proper installation and the price...
    I have the impression concrete ties cost 'more' and with railroads balking over the price of wood ties
    to hold the gauge on the right of way, 'tis difficult to see the idea of testing more expensive ties
    being put under heavy steam.

    victor

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  7. #85
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    Quote Originally Posted by victor miranda View Post
    I have the impression concrete ties cost 'more' and with railroads balking over the price of wood ties
    to hold the gauge on the right of way, 'tis difficult to see the idea of testing more expensive ties
    being put under heavy steam.

    victor
    The economy of the concrete ties is that they cost more initially but are more cost effective over the long run, as they can last up to 70 years before needing replacement, whereas wooden ties are made to last up to 30 years before needing replacement.

    Metro Red Ln (Metro Red Line)
    Under the streets of Los Angeles

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    Quote Originally Posted by MetroRedLn View Post
    whereas wooden ties are made to last up to 30 years before needing replacement.
    ...or, in the case of certain lines that shall go nameless, 100 years or more, via a miracle process known as 'deferred maintenance'
    ; )

  10. #87
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    lets hope the Big-Boy does not grace such rails...

    victor

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