Results 1 to 12 of 12

Thread: size problem

  1. #1
    Join Date
    May 2017
    Posts
    6
    Thanks
    0
    Thanked 0 Times in 0 Posts
    Mentioned
    0 Post(s)
    Tagged
    0 Thread(s)

    Default size problem

    hi all

    so i recently purchased an Arnold loco, as you can see from the pic the Arnold loco is on the left while a kato loco is on the right, the problem is that the Arnold loco looks smaller in size than the Kato, I am just asking whether the sizes are correct because it looks kinda of funny on my layout,

    https://photos.app.goo.gl/LGYAnLFvHe2s4Kvp6

    thanks
    Clayton

  2. #2
    Join Date
    Feb 2013
    Posts
    3,891
    Blog Entries
    1
    Thanks
    13,400
    Thanked 6,497 Times in 2,447 Posts
    Mentioned
    193 Post(s)
    Tagged
    0 Thread(s)

    Default

    Yes, it's because the locomotive on the left is not an American prototype. It's a Spanish class 316, but built in the U.S. by ALCo, and possibly has a different loading gauge, i.e., clearances are different in Spain than North America. It's only about 13 feet high (four meters), while the E unit is 14.6 feet high.

  3. The Following User Says Thank You to Paul Schmidt For This Useful Post:


  4. #3
    Join Date
    Jul 2019
    Location
    Vancouver, BC, Canada
    Posts
    42
    Thanks
    32
    Thanked 76 Times in 26 Posts
    Mentioned
    4 Post(s)
    Tagged
    0 Thread(s)

    Default

    Different locomotive models are going to be difference in sizes, just like their real world counterparts. The Kato is an E8/E9 and guessing the Arnold is based on a Eurpoean protoype. Quick google search returned a Spanish Diesel Locomotive Class 316.

    I'm guessing they are both built to scale.
    Kevin M.

  5. #4
    Join Date
    Nov 2017
    Location
    Ariege, France
    Posts
    1,010
    Thanks
    4,773
    Thanked 2,523 Times in 720 Posts
    Mentioned
    173 Post(s)
    Tagged
    0 Thread(s)

    Default

    I get the same thing when I park a British steamer next to a US equivalent. As pointed out, different loading gauges and power requirements. Shorter trains pulled over shorter distances. Does look strange though
    Thanks, Tom

    Expect nothing except the opposite of what you expect, and then expect it to be something other than that ! Then that's about what it will be

  6. #5
    Join Date
    Feb 2013
    Location
    Perth. Western Australia
    Posts
    866
    Blog Entries
    5
    Thanks
    2,484
    Thanked 1,442 Times in 530 Posts
    Mentioned
    39 Post(s)
    Tagged
    0 Thread(s)

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by Paul Schmidt View Post
    Yes, it's because the locomotive on the left is not an American prototype. It's a Spanish class 316, but built in the U.S. by ALCo, and possibly has a different loading gauge, i.e., clearances are different in Spain than North America. It's only about 13 feet high (four meters), while the E unit is 14.6 feet high.
    Clayton, what you have is the Spanish version of the South Australian 930 class and NSWGR 44 class, we have a smaller loading gauge than the USA. Also keep in mind the E8 is a twin engined loco, virtually 2 engine equivalent to the DL500.
    Are you sure it's Arnald?? Ibertren, the Spanish manufacturer were, AFAIK, the only commercal locos until recently when a real good quality locally produced N scale version was released.

    I didn't know they were also made in the US. ALCO world DL500B, made in Sydney by A. E. Goodwin under licence. Goodwin Alcos of that class, the NSWGR 44 class numbered 100 units in New South Wales and I think 30 in South Australia. Also saw swevice in Argentina and India as well as Greece and Spain to name other countries.
    https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/New_So...ass_locomotive
    https://www.trovestar.com/generic/zoom.php?id=131543
    Cheers,

    Russ

    CEO of Devil's Gate Mining Co.



  7. The Following 2 Users Say Thank You to mosslake For This Useful Post:


  8. #6
    Join Date
    Mar 2007
    Posts
    549
    Thanks
    7
    Thanked 948 Times in 341 Posts
    Mentioned
    44 Post(s)
    Tagged
    0 Thread(s)

    Default

    The only verified 'wackadoodle' size issue I've come accross - and it's more common than you think - is Japanese N is 1:150 and normal N is 1:160, so yes, the Japanese models ARE BIGGER than normal, as well as accessories.

    Now, the most outstanding case of that is the Micro-Ace 2-6-0, which is actually a US-built, 3' gauge (narrow gauge) Porter-built 2-6-0. Changed in scale to fit standard gauge N track, resulting in a much larger 2-6-0 than actual scale, but Japanese.... and that's what Atlas picked up as their vintage 2-6-0. It's still small, but put it beside a properly scaled Micro-ace built 4-4-0 from Atlas, and something looks terribly wrong. By itself it still passes as it's in surprising proportion, but if you really get into it, it's about 30% larger than it would be properly scaled and running on Nn3 track.
    http://www.spookshow.net/loco/atlas260.html
    https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/JGR_Class_7100

    If you want some head scratching, take those dimensions and compare it to the Atlas/Micro-Ace model...

    I have Kato and Tomytec Japanese vehicles too, and those are a little sketchy but work as they are smaller anyway.....

    It could be worse, you could be working with G gauge, and that stuff is all over the map with the same issues.
    Randgust N scale kits web page at www.randgust.com

  9. The Following User Says Thank You to randgust For This Useful Post:


  10. #7
    Join Date
    Feb 2013
    Location
    Perth. Western Australia
    Posts
    866
    Blog Entries
    5
    Thanks
    2,484
    Thanked 1,442 Times in 530 Posts
    Mentioned
    39 Post(s)
    Tagged
    0 Thread(s)

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by randgust View Post
    The only verified 'wackadoodle' size issue I've come accross
    in this case it is size. Both locos are the same scale, just the RENFE diesel is a smaller locomotive for tighter loading gauge.
    Cheers,

    Russ

    CEO of Devil's Gate Mining Co.



  11. #8
    Join Date
    Oct 2008
    Location
    Everywhere yet Nowhere
    Posts
    2,071
    Thanks
    2,308
    Thanked 2,038 Times in 769 Posts
    Mentioned
    28 Post(s)
    Tagged
    0 Thread(s)

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by tomcook View Post
    I get the same thing when I park a British steamer next to a US equivalent...
    This could be because British loco's and rolling stock are scaled to 1:148 instead of 1:160.
    https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/British_N_gauge

  12. The Following 2 Users Say Thank You to DrifterNL For This Useful Post:


  13. #9
    Join Date
    Feb 2013
    Posts
    3,891
    Blog Entries
    1
    Thanks
    13,400
    Thanked 6,497 Times in 2,447 Posts
    Mentioned
    193 Post(s)
    Tagged
    0 Thread(s)

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by DrifterNL View Post
    This could be because British loco's and rolling stock are scaled to 1:148 instead of 1:160.
    https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/British_N_gauge


    And even though 1:148 is the larger scale, British loading gauge is so tight that a model in 1:148 looks small compared to North American N scale.

  14. The Following 3 Users Say Thank You to Paul Schmidt For This Useful Post:


  15. #10
    Join Date
    Oct 2008
    Location
    Everywhere yet Nowhere
    Posts
    2,071
    Thanks
    2,308
    Thanked 2,038 Times in 769 Posts
    Mentioned
    28 Post(s)
    Tagged
    0 Thread(s)

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by Paul Schmidt View Post
    And even though 1:148 is the larger scale, British loading gauge is so tight that a model in 1:148 looks small compared to North American N scale.
    Just think how much smaller it would look scaled to 1:160.

  16. The Following 3 Users Say Thank You to DrifterNL For This Useful Post:


  17. #11
    Join Date
    Oct 2008
    Location
    Everywhere yet Nowhere
    Posts
    2,071
    Thanks
    2,308
    Thanked 2,038 Times in 769 Posts
    Mentioned
    28 Post(s)
    Tagged
    0 Thread(s)

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by clayton4115 View Post
    hi all

    so i recently purchased an Arnold loco, as you can see from the pic the Arnold loco is on the left while a kato loco is on the right, the problem is that the Arnold loco looks smaller in size than the Kato, I am just asking whether the sizes are correct because it looks kinda of funny on my layout,

    https://photos.app.goo.gl/LGYAnLFvHe2s4Kvp6



    thanks
    Clayton
    If this is an Arnold locomotive then according to this website it is scaled to 1:160 -> https://www.hornby.com/uk-en/arnold-...epoche-iv.html

    Have a look at the size difference between a Kato AC4400CW and a Kato EMD JT42CWR a.k.a Class 66 (Both 1:160) -> https://www.nscale.net/forums/showth...-k-a-CLASS-66)

  18. The Following 2 Users Say Thank You to DrifterNL For This Useful Post:


  19. #12
    Join Date
    Feb 2013
    Posts
    3,891
    Blog Entries
    1
    Thanks
    13,400
    Thanked 6,497 Times in 2,447 Posts
    Mentioned
    193 Post(s)
    Tagged
    0 Thread(s)

    Default

    Inside a Class 66 is an SD70 struggling to get out!

  20. The Following 3 Users Say Thank You to Paul Schmidt For This Useful Post:


Similar Threads

  1. Tunnel Size??
    By jweir43 in forum Layouts, Design, & Planning.
    Replies: 11
    Last Post: 14th Jan 2018, 10:37 PM
  2. P-42 cooling fan size
    By flysooner9 in forum Diesel
    Replies: 0
    Last Post: 17th Apr 2015, 01:38 PM
  3. Wiring size's. Is this a problem
    By Sundiesel in forum General Wiring
    Replies: 8
    Last Post: 13th Sep 2014, 04:49 PM
  4. Air Brush - Tip Size.
    By ejholden in forum Tooling
    Replies: 17
    Last Post: 1st Jul 2012, 11:09 PM
  5. a very odd size ... and I need help !
    By hepkat63 in forum Layouts, Design, & Planning.
    Replies: 19
    Last Post: 23rd Nov 2010, 10:36 PM

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •