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Thread: N-Scale Flex Track Situation...

  1. #21
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    Quote Originally Posted by wombat457 View Post
    Exactly ... it is all personal preference and what looks the best or right to the user. Everyone knows my preference of track so no need to repeat it.

    My suggestion to the OP is buy a "piece" of each type of Flex Track and see which one looks best, and suits him the best, from his perspective. How we visualize something may not be the same as how the OP does.
    -------
    I consider accuracy to the prototype to be the highest priority for scale modeling, not what I or anyone else thinks "looks" good or is nice or pleasing to look at.
    N-scale has a standard proportion of 1:160. Modelers can NOT choice their own proportions. The accepted standard is 1:160, not what "looks" good to each individual modeler.

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  3. #22
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    Quote Originally Posted by bicknell View Post
    You don't have FastTracks (https://www.handlaidtrack.com) on your list. Multiple choices of tie spacing, best looks by far.

    ME55 flex uses the same rail as FastTracks and has good tie spacing, so ME55 comes next in my book.

    Atlas 55 looks great, but due to the spike head/flange issue I can't use it on N-Trak modules. I'm not sure I would use it if I had a home layout for the same reason.
    ----
    HandLaidTrack is just MIND-BOGGLING! :-)
    They don't do flex-track though.

  4. #23
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    Quote Originally Posted by bicknell View Post
    Exactly, all personal preference, which is why all of you are wrong and I am 100% right.

    I second buying multiple track types. You know what, the real world isn't all one type. A Peco concrete main next to a ME-40 dilapidated siding is realistic and interesting.
    ---
    ALL of N-scale model rail roads on the planet earth are 1:160. :-)
    Thank GOD for standards! :-)

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    Quote Originally Posted by tbarber1027 View Post
    ALL of N-scale model rail roads on the planet earth are 1:160. :-)
    Thank GOD for standards! :-)
    Umm, no
    https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/N_scale

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  7. #25
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    Quote Originally Posted by tbarber1027 View Post
    ---
    ALL of N-scale model rail roads on the planet earth are 1:160. :-)
    Thank GOD for standards! :-)
    Well, yes there are standards, but N scale in Britain is 1:148 and also 1:152 (fine scale). And in Japan it can also be 1:150.
    Paul Schmidt

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  9. #26
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    Pretty sure that was a joke, guys.

    The wonderful thing about standards is, there's SO MANY to choose from!
    "Do Not Hump!?!?! Does that mean what I think it means?!?"--Michelle Blanchard

    "People saw wood and say nothing, but railroad men saw trains and say things that are better left unprinted."--Charles De Lano Hine

    Down with UP

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  11. #27
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    yep. whitworth is a standard.
    it is not one the world chose, for some reason

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    Can we get this thread back on track?
    --
    Leo Bicknell

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    what good is a track thread without a little flex?

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    Quote Originally Posted by tbarber1027 View Post
    I consider accuracy to the prototype to be the highest priority for scale modeling, not what I or anyone else thinks "looks" good or is nice or pleasing to look at.
    In that case you probably want to forget about "manufactured track" and go solely with "Hand Laid Track" as that is possibly the only way you will get 100% perfect prototype. That way you will be able to meticulously measure everything to obtain perfection.

    For the record - the standard distances between the ties for US track are as follows:

    Wooden Ties - 19" - 19.5"
    Concrete Ties - 24"

    By the way - as Bicknell has already pointed out, Peco Concrete Tie width is the scale equivalent of 24".

    So which do you want ... prototypical Wooden Ties or prototypical Concrete ties?

    Secondly, 1:160 is NOT the accepted standard for N Scale. As has been pointed out above, there are numerous "standards" for N Scale around the world. You really do need to confirm and validate your "information" before making such generalized statements.
    Cheers Tony

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    "It is easy to criticize ... a lot harder when you have to justify it"

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    The only known ballasted flex track is...
    https://www.fleischmann.de/en/produc.../products.html

    Kato is rumored to repackage it in Japan under their name. But the ballast profile is more like Tomix Fine Track rather than Unitrack. Points against it for having European tie spacing and Code 80 rails. But it does blend with the Japanese brands rather well.
    Use what you know about the world to model…
    Learn from modeling what you don't know about the real world.



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    Are we talking 6x6, 6x7, 7x7, 6x8, 7x8, 8x8, 7x9, 7x10, 8x10, or some other size tie? Are they 8, 8.5, or 9 feet long?

    https://www.rta.org/faqs-main

    19.5 is the "standard" for main line track for wood. 22-24 is very common on lightly used sidings, some industrial track, and even yard track for some roads. 24" would be more common for concrete. It might only be 12" on some bridges.

    Oh, and outside the US they might well have been steel ties. There have been a few experiments with plastic ones as well.

    Are we modeling the tie plates as well? Are they fastened with spikes, or maybe more modern screws? Maybe the concrete ones should model pandrol clamps? And what about J hooks to prevent creep? Never seen those on any model. No one models segmented track properly, with staggered 39' joints and fish plates either.

    Getting things prototypically correct is so hard!
    --
    Leo Bicknell

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    My standards may below. To me the only unrealistic track is track that hasn't been painted to remove that shine that comes up from flange. To me no matter what the tie spacing might be, that shine shouts "toy train".

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  21. #34
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    Quote Originally Posted by tbarber1027 View Post
    Modelers can NOT choice their own proportions. The accepted standard is 1:160, not what "looks" good to each individual modeler.
    Ahh , Uhm ....... yeah they can . Rule #1 is as follows ........ it's your railroad , do what you want .

    It's really that simple

    Some people like proto , some just don't care as much . Lots of good modelers are not true to proto

    Steve

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    Handlaying with code 40 will get you close, (at least for modern era track) but 100% accuracy? Nope. Code 40 is about 6.4 scale inches tall. About halfway between 100 and 115 pound rail. And, rail height is one thing, but most model rail isn't particularly close to any AREMA profile, it's thicker at most points, especially noticeable is the width of the head. Much heavier.
    So, unless you're intrepid enough to make your own rolling dies and draw your own rail, something's got to give.

    If you ARE that intrepid tho, do me a favor and model an older era with smaller lighter rail. Like 60 pound rail! And make extra for me!
    "Do Not Hump!?!?! Does that mean what I think it means?!?"--Michelle Blanchard

    "People saw wood and say nothing, but railroad men saw trains and say things that are better left unprinted."--Charles De Lano Hine

    Down with UP

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    Quote Originally Posted by ranulf View Post
    Handlaying with code 40 will get you close, (at least for modern era track) but 100% accuracy? Nope. Code 40 is about 6.4 scale inches tall. About halfway between 100 and 115 pound rail. And, rail height is one thing, but most model rail isn't particularly close to any AREMA profile, it's thicker at most points, especially noticeable is the width of the head. Much heavier.
    So, unless you're intrepid enough to make your own rolling dies and draw your own rail, something's got to give.

    If you ARE that intrepid tho, do me a favor and model an older era with smaller lighter rail. Like 60 pound rail! And make extra for me!

    ooof... I gave some serious consideration to making n-scale rail.
    I do not think you can run most n-scale rolling stock on code 30 rail.
    solder to PCB ties is required...
    At the time, I was not able to find the nickel-silver wire one would want to use...

    I decided to sort out how to make my steam locos work before I added a lot of tough track work.

    I'd buy code 30 rail were it available, I believe I'd try to make it if I could find the proper wire.

    victor

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    Quote Originally Posted by victor miranda View Post

    I decided to sort out how to make my steam locos work before I added a lot of tough track work.
    Probably the wisest course of action.

    Not actually expecting anyone to roll their own rail, my post was intended to be a little bit tongue-in-cheek; meant to point out that there are compromises in N scale. A LOT of them. And a blanket statement like "modellers can NOT choose their own proportions" Well.... That's a fine goal. But when you start working toward the goal of true scale fidelity, you find there are compromises EVERYWHERE, and nothing off the shelf will ever please you.
    "Do Not Hump!?!?! Does that mean what I think it means?!?"--Michelle Blanchard

    "People saw wood and say nothing, but railroad men saw trains and say things that are better left unprinted."--Charles De Lano Hine

    Down with UP

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    Quote Originally Posted by victor miranda View Post
    I'd buy code 30 rail were it available, I believe I'd try to make it if I could find the proper wire.
    http://www.2mm.org.uk/products/shops.php?shop_num=1

    Code 30 "rail". Note it's really flattened wire, it doesn't have a proper profile, but it is 0.030 high.
    --
    Leo Bicknell

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    Quote Originally Posted by bicknell View Post
    http://www.2mm.org.uk/products/shops.php?shop_num=1

    Code 30 "rail". Note it's really flattened wire, it doesn't have a proper profile, but it is 0.030 high.
    it is the right material...
    can't find the cost to join...
    I can make rollers to do that...
    somewhere around here I've got a roller...
    hmmmm.....

    victor

    victor

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