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Thread: My Round Red Barn scratch build

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    Default My Round Red Barn scratch build

    So I decided to make my first real attempt at N scale structure scratchbuilding by building a round red barn.

    I first started the build by drawing up a paper template for the top and base pieces. These two pieces are to be used to have something to glue the sides to.

    I used OpenSCAD (www.openscad.org) to draw a multi-sided cylinder at various sizes and exported the drawing for printing.

    I had originally intended to do a 16 sided barn but forget to change the number of sides (12) to 16 before printing.

    Oh well, 12 sides will be fine.
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    - Gary R.

    President & CEO
    Pinnacle & Western Railroad

    Never under-do the over-kill.

    I don't always stop for trains, but when ... oh wait!, Yes I do.

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    Default My Red Barn scratchbuild - foundation

    Once I printed the template, I checked the wall-to-wall distances and chose the 6th ring from the center. This scales out to roughly 40 feet, a decent size barn for my purposes.

    I cut the template roughly to size, then using some .040 styrene sheet, cut a top and a bottom (2 pieces).

    Since my styrene cutting skills are not so good (but going to get better), I spent some time filing the pieces until they were pretty close to the same size with the same wall widths all the way around.

    There was still some variation in the wall widths, so I marked the top on each piece and put alignment marks on 3 sides so that I could keep them in the same orientation to each other.
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    - Gary R.

    President & CEO
    Pinnacle & Western Railroad

    Never under-do the over-kill.

    I don't always stop for trains, but when ... oh wait!, Yes I do.

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    Default My Red Barn scratchbuild - cutting the walls

    Time to think about walls...

    I wanted basically a 2 story barn on a stone foundation, so how tall to make the walls?

    I reasoned that this barn was probably built in a time before Lowe's and Home Depot and that the builder would probably have milled his own lumber. This premise allowed me the freedom of choosing 12 feet per story. I also wanted approx. a 4 ft stone foundation reveal at this base. It all adds up to 28 feet tall walls.

    I had an old piece of styrene siding my stash pile that had been used for air-brush testing in the past.

    I first cut a 28 scale foot wide piece along the full 14 inch side. Then that strip was cut into 12 pieces according to my calculated wall width. (This will come back to haunt me later).
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    - Gary R.

    President & CEO
    Pinnacle & Western Railroad

    Never under-do the over-kill.

    I don't always stop for trains, but when ... oh wait!, Yes I do.

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    Default My Red Barn scratchbuild - assembly #1

    Now it's time to put the main structure together.

    It's at this point I discover the issues I had introduced earlier:

    1. Because I 'evened up' the walls on the top and base, the actual wall widths on those pieces were actually smaller than calculated.
    2. Because of #1, the width of the wall sides were cut wider than needed.

    How to fix?
    A. Trim the side pieces to closer fit ( a pain in the neck) and
    B. Finish file the side pieces to actual fit (not so bad, sort of therapeutic).

    So with the base, trim a wall, file the wall to final width, glue wall to base, wait for glue to dry. Wash, rinse, repeat until half the walls are attached to the base.

    I'm using a piece of hardware store sheet metal and some cheap hardware store magnets to hold the parts in place until the glue dries.
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    - Gary R.

    President & CEO
    Pinnacle & Western Railroad

    Never under-do the over-kill.

    I don't always stop for trains, but when ... oh wait!, Yes I do.

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    Default My Red Barn scratchbuild - assembly #2

    Once I had half (6) of the walls in place, I added the top piece, then continued trimming and fitting the remaining walls.
    Attached Images Attached Images
    - Gary R.

    President & CEO
    Pinnacle & Western Railroad

    Never under-do the over-kill.

    I don't always stop for trains, but when ... oh wait!, Yes I do.

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    Looking good!
    Daniel Dawson

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    Default My Red Barn scratchbuild - main building painting

    Once all the walls were in place and the glue dried, it was time to paint the main building.

    First question was what about the old color on the walls. Should I primer over it or leave it as an undercoat for the new color.

    The paint I had decided to use was Apple Barrel brand (from Wal Mart) Barn Red matte acrylic. By itself, it's to thick, so I thinned it with Vallejo Airbrush Thinner in about a 2 parts paint to 1 part thinner mix.

    I did a test on a piece of leftover wall material and decided not to primer over the original red color. If the brighter red shows through, it might look more like weathered paint than a primer would.

    Two coats of paint later, I'm generally please with the paint job. I can still see hints of the lighter red through the darker, but it does add a nice variation to the paint color. More weathering later on will dull it even further.
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    - Gary R.

    President & CEO
    Pinnacle & Western Railroad

    Never under-do the over-kill.

    I don't always stop for trains, but when ... oh wait!, Yes I do.

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    Default My Red Barn scratchbuild - main roof

    The next item on the agenda is the main barn roof.

    My first thought was to dust of the old college trig book to refresh but then decided I'm too allergic (to both the dust and the trig).

    Then I remembered @Janbouli's barn build thread (https://www.nscale.net/forums/showth...444#post320444).

    The roof shown in janbouli's contents photo is basically 14 triangles (that's a 14 sided barn) arranged in a circle with room for a 15th triangle. The magic is the missing 15th triangle. Without it, one can join the unattached long sides of the 1st and 14th triangles, and when that's done, a cone is formed.

    To adapt that to my build, I went back to my OpenSCAD and printed out a cylinder with 13 sides (12 sided barn), drew lines from the corners to the middle, cut out 1 triangle, then taped the two unattached long sides together.

    Once trimmed for overhang, the roof mockup is on the main building for a test fit.

    I don't have enough .040 styrene on hand to cut out the roof and besides, I think it will be too thick to bend easily.
    I also think .010 styrene will be too thin to hold it's shape without sagging.

    I have some .020 styrene sheet already on order, so I think I'll wait to proceed until that arrives.
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    - Gary R.

    President & CEO
    Pinnacle & Western Railroad

    Never under-do the over-kill.

    I don't always stop for trains, but when ... oh wait!, Yes I do.

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    Looking good Gary , I presume there will be no windows , cause it will be tough to cut them out now.
    As long as I can model in N-scale, I know I'm not old

    My Flickr Pages

    http://www.janbouli.com

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    Quote Originally Posted by Janbouli View Post
    Looking good Gary , I presume there will be no windows , cause it will be tough to cut them out now.
    I decided to proceed without windows for the time being as I don't have enough in the parts bin to do the whole building. I didn't want to mix window styles.

    But I have a plan ...

    Years ago, a dentist friend gave me some dental burrs (sales samples he'd received from his supplier). When the time comes to install the windows, I'll chuck one of them into the Dremel and carve out the window openings. I'll just have to remember to put the windows in before the final assembly.
    - Gary R.

    President & CEO
    Pinnacle & Western Railroad

    Never under-do the over-kill.

    I don't always stop for trains, but when ... oh wait!, Yes I do.

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    Hi Gary. Nice build!

    You might want to check out my build in the downloads section (https://www.nscale.net/forums/downlo...?do=file&id=46) It has windows. Provided templates make it easy to cut out parts. Provided directions make assembly easy.
    Charter member of CAMRRA.

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    This is perfect as I have been thinking of starting a similar scratch build myself. I don’t have your skills but your detailed explanation of the build is sure to be invaluable. Thanks for posting this when you did. It’s looking great.

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    Quote Originally Posted by New View Post
    This is perfect as I have been thinking of starting a similar scratch build myself. I don’t have your skills but your detailed explanation of the build is sure to be invaluable. Thanks for posting this when you did. It’s looking great.
    @New: What skill's? - Honestly, this is my first 'serious' scratch build so you're probably not to far behind in skill level. Just plan as best you can, take your time, and be ready to adjust or rehash if necessary.
    - Gary R.

    President & CEO
    Pinnacle & Western Railroad

    Never under-do the over-kill.

    I don't always stop for trains, but when ... oh wait!, Yes I do.

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    Quote Originally Posted by gary60s View Post
    Hi Gary. Nice build!

    You might want to check out my build in the downloads section (https://www.nscale.net/forums/downlo...?do=file&id=46) It has windows. Provided templates make it easy to cut out parts. Provided directions make assembly easy.
    @ gary60s

    Yes, I have downloaded several of your plans and hope to build them over the next few weeks / months. Thanks.
    - Gary R.

    President & CEO
    Pinnacle & Western Railroad

    Never under-do the over-kill.

    I don't always stop for trains, but when ... oh wait!, Yes I do.

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    Quote Originally Posted by Gary Rowan View Post
    @New: What skill's? - Honestly, this is my first 'serious' scratch build so you're probably not to far behind in skill level. Just plan as best you can, take your time, and be ready to adjust or rehash if necessary.
    Hahaha Gary,
    I’ll give mine a start this weekend and load some pics here. I’ve started scratch building a few things but don’t even have a layout yet. We can compare disaster reports. Yours is looking great!

    Chad

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    Default My Red Barn scratchbuild - main roof - part 2

    Now that the styrene sheet has arrived, it's time to get on with red barn build.

    So which to use? .020? .030. Let's start with the .020 and see how that works.

    Step 1. Take the paper mockup (which was also the template) and cut the tape so that it lays flat again.

    Step 2. Take the template and starting on one of the edges of the triangle that was cut out, tape the template to the styrene on all edges, making sure the template stays flat.

    Step 3. Cutting around the outside edge of the template, remove the excess. I found that with enough passed of the exacto knife, I could get a clean cut all the way through. This helped minimize most of the cleanup on the cut edges. Once the outside is cut out, score along the lines from the edge points to the center, (the spokes) just enough to establish a line for the upcoming bending.

    Step 4. Drill a relief hole in the center where all the spokes meet in the middle. I used the tip of the exacto knife to get the hole started, then enlarged it with a round needle file.

    Step 5. Cut out one of the segments. Remember from earlier that the template had thirteen segments and the barn has 12 sides.

    Step 6. This is the tricky part - bending along the lines. This is the perfect time to inspect the score lines and re-score any light ones. The first one I tried was to light and the piece had a more rounded bend than I wanted. I also found that using a metal straight-edge on top along the score line and another straight edge underneath helped in getting a sharper bend. Take care during the bend that you don't overbend. I went to far on one and heard the styrene start to crack. If that happens, slap a piece of painters tape over it to hold it together. You can reinforce it later from underneath.

    Step 7: Once all the bends are done, bring the two long sides of the missing triangle together and glue. I used a piece of .010 x 0.125 styrene strip underneath to hold the joint together. Once the glue dries, test fit on the barn. If it doesn't fit exactly, you can adjust the bends (up to a point) to get a closer fit.
    Attached Images Attached Images
    - Gary R.

    President & CEO
    Pinnacle & Western Railroad

    Never under-do the over-kill.

    I don't always stop for trains, but when ... oh wait!, Yes I do.

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