Results 1 to 9 of 9

Thread: Tree Sizes

  1. #1
    Join Date
    Jan 2018
    Location
    West Palm Beach, FL
    Posts
    224
    Thanks
    1,056
    Thanked 721 Times in 128 Posts
    Mentioned
    10 Post(s)
    Tagged
    0 Thread(s)

    Default Tree Sizes

    Hello all. What size, (tall), trees do you use in your towns... and on your mountains? Thank you.

  2. #2
    Join Date
    Sep 2009
    Location
    Minneapolis, MN
    Posts
    1,090
    Blog Entries
    2
    Thanks
    1,269
    Thanked 4,744 Times in 729 Posts
    Mentioned
    80 Post(s)
    Tagged
    0 Thread(s)

    Default

    2" - 6" depending.

    I try to put tall trees only in spots like people's yards in town, or in the wild where there wouldn't have been logging in quite a while. Small trees and bushes can go anywhere.

  3. The Following 2 Users Say Thank You to Ender For This Useful Post:


  4. #3
    Join Date
    Feb 2013
    Posts
    3,857
    Blog Entries
    1
    Thanks
    13,023
    Thanked 6,375 Times in 2,411 Posts
    Mentioned
    181 Post(s)
    Tagged
    0 Thread(s)

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by Ender View Post
    2" - 6" depending.

    I try to put tall trees only in spots like people's yards in town, or in the wild where there wouldn't have been logging in quite a while. Small trees and bushes can go anywhere.
    And I place shorter trees to the back and atop hills, with taller trees to the front, generally. If it's a small grove, odd numbers are better.

  5. The Following 2 Users Say Thank You to Paul Schmidt For This Useful Post:


  6. #4
    Join Date
    May 2009
    Location
    Las Vegas, NV
    Posts
    3,083
    Thanks
    1,406
    Thanked 4,572 Times in 1,441 Posts
    Mentioned
    61 Post(s)
    Tagged
    1 Thread(s)

    Default

    It depends on the variety of tree (I have different types on my layout). Generally speaking I run 1-1/2” to 3-1/2”
    Karl

    CEO of the Skally Line, an Eastern MN Shortline

  7. The Following 3 Users Say Thank You to jpwisc For This Useful Post:


  8. #5
    Join Date
    Nov 2006
    Location
    Los Angeles, CA, USA
    Posts
    3,070
    Thanks
    1,343
    Thanked 3,027 Times in 1,044 Posts
    Mentioned
    38 Post(s)
    Tagged
    0 Thread(s)

    Default

    Trees grow in different sizes according to age and species. But do consider the scale of the trunk and branches - A 2" HO scale tree might actually be more out of scale than a 4" N scale tree.

    Also bear in mind a couple things (having planted a few trees in my life):

    * There are two general kinds of trees that would "grow" in your layout: Ornamental trees (intentionally planted by humans) and wild trees (native growth or planted unintentionally by wind/animals).
    Nearly any tree can work on your layout (especially in a location like a city/town setting), but most likely it's an ornamental tree. Those are more likely to be planted in neat rows along streets, yards or property lines, and are more likely to be pruned/trimmed. Wild trees are usually more specific to a certain geography/climate, are normally not trimmed/pruned and are somewhat more random in growth pattern.

    * Many trees have root structures that mirror their branch structures. A wide-branching tree would have a wide root pattern. This is partly for stability reasons. Do not place wide-branching trees too close to each other as they could not grow that close in real life as their roots would clash and compete for water/nutrients. However, narrow-branching trees like pines, redwoods, etc can grow in dense clusters.

    * Think about where water would likely collect; that's a more likely place for a wild tree to grow.

    * Do some quick research on tree varieties that usually grow in your layout's geography and model those as you would model a building or a locomotive, taking into account proportional dimensions.
    Last edited by MetroRedLn; 11th Mar 2020 at 01:35 AM.

    Metro Red Ln (Metro Red Line)
    Under the streets of Los Angeles

  9. The Following 5 Users Say Thank You to MetroRedLn For This Useful Post:


  10. #6
    Join Date
    Aug 2016
    Location
    New York State
    Posts
    4,483
    Blog Entries
    4
    Thanks
    7,156
    Thanked 7,240 Times in 2,395 Posts
    Mentioned
    218 Post(s)
    Tagged
    0 Thread(s)

    Default

    Anywhere from 1" to 6" but preferably 1 1/2" to 4". Consider this, 1" = 13.3' N Scale so the question should be, what size trees do you want to replicate?
    Cheers Tony

    "Knowing what to do is one thing ... being able to do it is another"
    "It is easy to criticize ... a lot harder when you have to justify it"

  11. The Following 3 Users Say Thank You to wombat457 For This Useful Post:


  12. #7
    Join Date
    Jan 2013
    Location
    Zombietopia, Washington
    Posts
    5,972
    Thanks
    20,399
    Thanked 14,370 Times in 4,052 Posts
    Mentioned
    509 Post(s)
    Tagged
    0 Thread(s)

    Default

    Da Mooses live in the Pacific Northwest, and that means real trees - Conifers!

    Yep, they range from 4.5" (60 scale feet) to 15" (200 scale feet)!
    ~ Moose (Co-founder of the Mt. Tahoma & Pacific Railroad, located some where in the Pacific Northwest)

    "Beware the Train of Thought that Carries no Freight..."

    "Reading is for morons who can't understand pictures..."

    Click Here to See Moose's Layout Thread

  13. The Following User Says Thank You to Moose2013 For This Useful Post:


  14. #8
    Join Date
    Jan 2018
    Location
    West Palm Beach, FL
    Posts
    224
    Thanks
    1,056
    Thanked 721 Times in 128 Posts
    Mentioned
    10 Post(s)
    Tagged
    0 Thread(s)

    Default

    thanks for the quick responses. i am trying to plan out the next stage of my build.

  15. The Following 2 Users Say Thank You to FrankieD For This Useful Post:


  16. #9
    Join Date
    May 2005
    Location
    Cambridge, New Zealand
    Posts
    3,022
    Blog Entries
    17
    Thanks
    3,651
    Thanked 2,666 Times in 897 Posts
    Mentioned
    32 Post(s)
    Tagged
    0 Thread(s)

    Default

    FWIW:

    I have found that visually 'N' scale trees simply don't look 'right' and as a result (and if I don't make my own, or want to create 'standing timber' in a hurry or in quantity) I use HO-scale items instead. They look good and no-one ever comments on their size. Most of the trees visible in the pic below are HO items and seem to 'fit-in' quite well.

    As I said, FWIW. I hope this helps.


    - - - Updated - -

    DSCF5356 (4).jpg
    Komata "TVR - serving the Northern Taranaki . . . "

  17. The Following 7 Users Say Thank You to Komata For This Useful Post:


Similar Threads

  1. Fan sizes?
    By tefsom85 in forum Modeling Techniques
    Replies: 5
    Last Post: 1st Jun 2015, 09:23 PM
  2. Turnout sizes
    By grweldon in forum Layouts, Design, & Planning.
    Replies: 5
    Last Post: 29th Nov 2012, 06:38 PM
  3. Wheel sizes
    By RyanMac in forum Rollingstock
    Replies: 7
    Last Post: 25th Feb 2012, 02:12 AM
  4. Drill and Tap Sizes
    By quietstorm in forum Tooling
    Replies: 7
    Last Post: 1st Aug 2010, 09:03 AM
  5. Layout sizes
    By Catt (RIP) in forum General Rail Discussion
    Replies: 28
    Last Post: 15th Oct 2005, 10:15 AM

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •