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Thread: Interlaken Ost Bahnhof - attempt

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    Default Interlaken Ost Bahnhof - attempt

    Last night I was expressing my dismay that there is no model kit for the Interlaken Ost Bahnhof in Interlaken, Switzerland, and that it is too complex for me to scratchbuild. My wife reminded me of our personal family motto, "How tough could it be?", and told me to give it a try. "Really, it can't be as hard as you think."

    I have been dwelling on this the rest of the evening and all morning, and - surprise, surprise! - decided to give it a try. If it doesn't work out, nothing lost but some effort and time. Here is the prototype:

    https://media.jungfrau.ch/image/uplo...rlaken-Ost.jpg




    Wish me luck, guys!

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    piece of cake . you can do it.

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    I'm wagering on you, Gordon!

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    I would think those little rounded-top windows would be the toughest.
    interlaken-ost.JPG

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    Where do you begin on something like that? After the footprint do you attack the walls or the roof first. Materials...styrene, cardboard, wood?

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    This is a beautiful station on an incredible railroad. Good luck. I will follow your build thread eagerly.

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    Where do I start? Thinking! Research. Hmmm. Not many photos online for the track side of the Bahnhof, so I guess that means a trip....

    Materials. First floor and portico will be 1/8" MDF. The arches look like about 3 meters or 10 feet, with 1 m. or 3 ft between. Piece of cake with Forstner bits and band saw.

    Windows could be a toughy.

    Next shape rafters or roof trusses to get the shape of the different roof angles. Those little arched windows are no big deal. Cut a piece of styrene tubing on an angle and in half lengthwise, glue it to a bit of U-channel, and sand to fit.

    The roof will probably be thin styrene, 0.020, perhaps. Then an applique for the shingles.

    Now that I am almost done with the Gotthard Base Tunnel and have been giving this some thought, I'm anxious to get started!

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    The windows that will be hard will be the ones on the dormers. If you look at the 3 dormers on the right, the left hand one has one window open like a casement opening inward. The next one has the two windows tilted in at the top. Both are the same kind of window.

    If you turn the handle one way the window hinges on the side and it opens like a casement. Turn the handle the other way and the window hinges on the bottom and opens at the top. So far as I know, a uniquely European style.

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    Quote Originally Posted by el Gato Gordo View Post
    If you turn the handle one way the window hinges on the side and it opens like a casement. Turn the handle the other way and the window hinges on the bottom and opens at the top. So far as I know, a uniquely European style.
    The are called Tilt and Turn Windows. They are available in Canada but they are not very popular. We had a door like that in our house but it wasn't very good in the winter so I replaced it.
    Regards,
    Warren

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    Good luck! This is a challenge, but that will just make the final result that much sweeter.

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    Looks like a good challenge to stretch your skills.
    Completely do-able.... (although easier with blueprints... I tried searching for anything resembling a plan)

    A few track side shots show up in google image search.
    Google Earth offer a satellite view of the roof outline... albeit, fuzzy. But you can get some rough dimensional lines(?)
    interlaken.jpg

    If you have access to sheet styrene, don't overlook it as a source for the walls. I find plastic easier to layout, cut/shape, glue and paint vs wood products. The portico walls could any thickness styrene with strip styrene glued to edges (boxed) for depth.

    2 Cents of roof experience, FWIW:
    Having built many architectural models where roof plans did not always show enough details. One way to visualize is by breaking down each "segment" of the roof, similar angles and ridge lines, into squared blocks, minus slopes, and then adding in the sloped segments. Layers of a "cake". A styrene cutout of the lowest plan roof outline, a solid block layer of first level up to mid roof line, a second layer can be added. the pitched roof angles is like filling in the icing. If you guesstimate the roof dimensions in height A, depth B, and length, the angled roof pitches work themselves out as the layers will show where they need to fit. (if that makes sense...)
    ROOF.jpg
    Mitering the corners looks tricky, but again, you now can see the connecting points via the "cake" and can mark the top and bottom of the pitched styrene "icing" pieces.
    The curving roof lines do present a trial and error situation. The whole thing can be mocked up in heavy card stock and then used as templates for cutting styrene.

    A few will argue that measuring and calculating the exact angles is easy a necessary, but with this method, you really never need to play with measuring angles and pitches, which at these small dimension have no tolerances for being off even a degree.

    Good luck.

    (Started out trying to be encouraging, then got excited about your project and started rambling. Take it for what it's worth, rooting for your success, however you achieve it.)
    Steve - Jugtown Modeler..............Don't know enough about railroading yet, but scale modeling is my life..............Web-Folio

    The introduction of so powerful an agent as steam to a carriage on wheels will make a great change in the situation of man. -- Thomas Jefferson, 1802


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    Ditto what @Jugtown Modeler says, Google Earth's ruler tool is great for this sort of thing, and there are a ton of photos.
    interlaken ost.jpg
    I used it to model a bridge, same technique should work on buildings. I would start by drawing up the main floor plan and the plan for the 2nd floor, then using your copier's zoom setting to print them in N scale. With the photos you can use length to width ratios to figure out the heights and draw up some elevations. Those roofs scare me though.

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    How close to exact is your station going to be? If your just going to capture the 'feel' of the building then you could cut down these round top windows for the arched windows..
    https://www.tichytraingroup.com/Shop...0/Default.aspx
    Maybe a combination of windows can come up with the multi opening window...
    Cheers,

    Russ

    CEO of Devil's Gate Mining Co.



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    How close to prototype? Pretty close, but not obsessive. Thanks for all the suggestions, everyone!

    I have previously modelled some friends' vacation home in the Black Forest by carving it out of blue foam. I plan to do mockups of sections of the Bahnhof preparatory to building those sections: main floor, and various roof sections.

    The tip about Google Earth's measuring system is something I had forgotten. Much appreciated!

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    I've made a little progress on the Interlaken Ost Bahnhof build. I cut out the front portico, and the walls for the first and second floor. The rafters are cut. Still much figuring, contemplating, calculating to do:



    The prototype has 3 large dormers and a small one on each side of the central section. I shortened the length of the building to fit in available space, and so will be eliminating one large dormer on each side. The walls and rafters are held in place with scotch tape, awaiting a shipment of windows and doors. I want to cut the openings before assembly.

    Also have to figure out how to handle the ends of the roof, and I need more photo details of the track side of the Bahnhof, which will face the front of the layout. Other than that, this is going well - three steps forward, two steps back.


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    Progress again! Yeehaaa!

    I cut the framing pieces just at the attic line. I used the best of the cut attic pieces to be a template, marking the outline on 1/2" foam. Cut out the foam pieces, glue them together, and then measure the angle of the hip ends. Cut that off with a razor saw, and taped to a piece of styrene plastic with Scotch double sided tape.



    This is rough, and needs to be sanded before applying the red tile roof sheet. The Noch roof sheets I have used in the past are perfect for this building - but they are out of production. I had to order something that looks good on the screen, but I really don't know if it will be suitable.

    Happy with the progress thus far. Still waiting for delivery of windows and doors, and contemplating the track side of the building and how to handle that.

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    By the way, since I am not trying to reproduce the town or even the train station square (Bahnhofplatz) of Interlaken, Switzerland, the name will be "Interloafin Ost Bahnhof." The east station in the town of Interloafin.

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    Redacted and edited! I'm still waiting for the sheets of roofing tiles, but I've had this paint on hand since 2012 and, amazingly, it is still good! Windows and doors came in today, but very few are usable, and the ones that are need many more clones of themselves before I can cut openings.



    So, now I have the right photo in this post, and no, it is nowhere near finished. Sigh.
    Last edited by el Gato Gordo; 18th Sep 2020 at 08:09 PM.

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    Aaaarrrrgggghhhhhh! Posted in the wrong thread!

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