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Thread: A lifetime supply of N scale corrugated roofing for $1.57

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    Default A lifetime supply of N scale corrugated roofing for $1.57

    I want to put corrugated roofing on one of my limestone mine buildings. All the styrene "corrugated sheeting" just looks way too thick, so I looked into getting a Corrugated Iron Maker from Brunel Hobbies. It's a slick little device for making corrugated roofing from tinfoil. Unfortunately for me, there doesn't appear to be a US retailer, and shipping from Australia was $25, plus the cost of the tool itself. Being somewhat...umm, thrifty...I decided to find a better way. So, off to the Dollar Tree we go!

    Box of tinfoil $0.99
    Pocket comb $0.49
    total with tax $1.57


    I cut some tinfoil into small strips, laid it on the fine-tooth end of the comb, and ran my finger across the top. Trim them to the correct width with a pair of scissors, and voila! Corrugated roofing. I'm still working on my technique, but if I screw up the first 100 or so, it's no loss. At 37.5 feet per roll, my not-so-educated math skills tell me that a roll of tinfoil will produce around 960,000 square feet of N scale roofing.

    Once it's weathered, I think it will look pretty good. Anyone have an easier way to do this? I'm open to suggestions. Thanks!
    Attached Images Attached Images


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    Quote Originally Posted by bikerraypa View Post
    I cut some tinfoil into small strips, laid it on the fine-tooth end of the comb, and ran my finger across the top. Trim them to the correct width with a pair of scissors, and voila! Corrugated roofing. I'm still working on my technique, but if I screw up the first 100 or so, it's no loss. At 37.5 feet per roll, my not-so-educated math skills tell me that a roll of tinfoil will produce around 960,000 square feet of N scale roofing.

    Once it's weathered, I think it will look pretty good. Anyone have an easier way to do this? I'm open to suggestions. Thanks!

    Wow thanks! A standard comb might have too large a teeth, but I got this finer-toothed comb that came with my WS Static King grass applicator for brushing off excess static grass fibers.

    Now all I need to do is to perfect my rusting techniques and I can build my very own N scale Love Shack!


    Metro Red Ln (Metro Red Line)
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    I have seen this done before, a different way, but yours looks better and easier. I have seen a way to make capping for the top of the roof or apex of where the 2 sheets meet if you are interested, it is tricky but doable. I have also read in a modelling magazine, that heavy duty commercial kitchen tin foil is better for what you are doing, it is a bit thicker and more manageable.

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    A method for capping would be great. I was just going to (try to) cut a long, thin strip of tinfoil and sort of press it into place along the apex.

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    You can't do that, it is too fine. What you do is, get a steel ruler, fold it over the edge in cut sections, then cut the the edges off, so it is about 1/8 of an inch wide. Cut it as you would see it at the hardware store, and cut it and install it as you would in real life, in sections. But the industrial tin foil is much better to work with, not as fine and more user friendly for modelling. But i like the sheets that you are producing, looks like you have it down pat. Hope this helps.

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    I find that by spreading a medium thick coat of white wood glue to stick them down with, the corigations get reinforced when the glue drys and ar less likely to getting squished during handerling.
    Thanks, Tom

    Expect nothing except the opposite of what you expect, and then expect it to be something other than that ! Then that's about what it will be

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    Would something along the lines of a (children's lice) comb or dog's flea comb work for making small lines in aluminum? Just a thought...
    713MZZnatUL._AC_SL1200_.jpg 5295661.jpg
    N-joy!
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    This link showed up in the similar threads section at the bottom:

    https://www.nscale.net/forums/showth...t-metal-roller

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    I find when gluing them down (or even attaching to transfer tape), they are easily bent and crinkle. Is there someway to harden them before or just try to be extra careful?
    Just another n-scaler.

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    Quote Originally Posted by Tred View Post
    Would something along the lines of a (children's lice) comb or dog's flea comb work for making small lines in aluminum? Just a thought...
    713MZZnatUL._AC_SL1200_.jpg 5295661.jpg

    Yes, a really fine-toothed comb like the one on the right was what I was looking for, but at the Dollar Store, they have what they have and they didn't have one. I'll probably pick one up the next time I'm at the grocery store or somewhere, and give that a try as well.

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    Quote Originally Posted by schedule22 View Post
    I find when gluing them down (or even attaching to transfer tape), they are easily bent and crinkle. Is there someway to harden them before or just try to be extra careful?
    I'm experimenting with them a bit before I try them on an actual structure. So far, what I've found to work best is to spread a small surface very lightly with Aleene's, then let it set and get tacky for a few minutes. I then used fine-tip tweezers to lay each sheet into position, and it seems to work very well. I can see how, as VRB60 mentioned above, it might be a good idea to use the heavy-duty foil instead. It's quite easy to smoosh these ones if I'm not careful.

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    No matter what method you use there is one common denominator, be patient and go slow and take your time. You are going to have stuff up's because it is such delicate material, so make plenty of sheets when you are making them, then you will have spare sheets on hand. I did read, that you can try making a glue mixture that you can spray from a spritz bottle onto the sheets and let it dry, this gives them a bit more stability for moving around. But the key is patience and taking your time. Something all modellers should be used to.

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    Quote Originally Posted by VRB60 View Post
    heavy duty commercial kitchen tin foil
    Do you or anyone else know where to get the thicker foil?

    Da Mooses checked the local Dollar store, but they didn't carry anything other than the normal thin kitchen stuff...
    = >

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    Quote Originally Posted by Moose2013 View Post
    Do you or anyone else know where to get the thicker foil?

    Da Mooses checked the local Dollar store, but they didn't carry anything other than the normal thin kitchen stuff...
    My local grocery store carries it, but neither Dollar Tree nor Dollar General does. I'll pick up a roll the next time I go grocery shopping. It's really not much more expensive at all. I do the vast majority of my shopping with local businesses, and avoid the mega-sized big box retailers, but I'm sure that Wal-Mart or Target would probably have it as well.

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    Quote Originally Posted by bikerraypa View Post
    Corrugated Iron Maker from Brunel Hobbies. It's a slick little device for making corrugated roofing from tinfoil
    It certainly is. I've had one for a while now, well worth the money.
    Cheers,
    Russ

    CEO Moss Lake Lumber Co.

    Pennsylvania logging circa 1890s

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    Quote Originally Posted by bikerraypa View Post
    My local grocery store carries it, but neither Dollar Tree nor Dollar General does. I'll pick up a roll the next time I go grocery shopping. It's really not much more expensive at all. I do the vast majority of my shopping with local businesses, and avoid the mega-sized big box retailers, but I'm sure that Wal-Mart or Target would probably have it as well.
    The best place to get it is, if you have one locally, commercial kitchen outlets.

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    I was immediately thinking of a flea comb when I saw this, must be the dog person in me. They are nice and fine and straight.

    I have a little bit of the heavy duty foil. Reynolds markets it as "Heavy Duty". I'm thinking for the roofing panels thinner would actually work better, then set it in a bed of glue like someone suggested. But for things like the ridge caps the Heavy Duty might be better. Sometimes the Heavy Duty is with the disposable roasting pans which in my stores is near the baking pans for sale on the baking aisle not over with plastic wrap and waxed paper on the paper goods aisle.

    It looks like a very good technique. I'm wondering if someone could 3-D print an entire "roof" (e.g. multiple panels) in plastic that you just press a sheet over and get a single sheet roof that looks like multiple panels........
    --
    Leo Bicknell

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    Quote Originally Posted by bikerraypa View Post
    I want to put corrugated roofing on one of my limestone mine buildings. All the styrene "corrugated sheeting" just looks way too thick, so I looked into getting a Corrugated Iron Maker from Brunel Hobbies. It's a slick little device for making corrugated roofing from tinfoil. Unfortunately for me, there doesn't appear to be a US retailer, and shipping from Australia was $25, plus the cost of the tool itself. Being somewhat...umm, thrifty...I decided to find a better way. So, off to the Dollar Tree we go!

    Box of tinfoil $0.99
    Pocket comb $0.49
    total with tax $1.57


    I cut some tinfoil into small strips, laid it on the fine-tooth end of the comb, and ran my finger across the top. Trim them to the correct width with a pair of scissors, and voila! Corrugated roofing. I'm still working on my technique, but if I screw up the first 100 or so, it's no loss. At 37.5 feet per roll, my not-so-educated math skills tell me that a roll of tinfoil will produce around 960,000 square feet of N scale roofing.

    Once it's weathered, I think it will look pretty good. Anyone have an easier way to do this? I'm open to suggestions. Thanks!
    I was thinking about this last night and an idea came to mind, this is only my idea and i have no proof that it would actually work, but i think it would. You know how fine and difficult tin foil is to work with, what about this idea. Purchase an aluminium baking tray, you may have to get a couple. Cut them into sections ,say 2 inch by 4 inch. Place one of these between 2 blocks of wood and tighten them hard as you can in a vice. It may take a few attempts, but if you can thin it out enough, you should have a piece of aluminium that you can corrugate, cut to size, but will be more stable to work with and have more strength. Or if you don't have a vice, place the foil between the 2 blocks of wood and on a table or bench, flatten it with a hammer or mallet, same again, just keep working it till you get the required thickness. Just a thought.

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    @VRB60

    Pasta maker ... Just borrow yer wife's pasta maker, put it on it's thinnest setting, possibly run multiple stacked sheets together. Should save time over vices and hammers, yes?

    Just Moose's two cents...
    = >

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    Anyone got good pics of what these look like on the model when finished? How's the tinfoil like to weather and rust?

    I've had good luck with dried corn husk for corrugated tin roof, but making it look like rusting metal is an art project.

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