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Thread: No-ox-id and insulated frogs

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    Default No-ox-id and insulated frogs

    Facing my annual round of "let's scrape all the gunk off the test track," I have sprung for a bottle of the magic elixir. (And have the the old no-ox thread bookmarked, after learning the hard way that the search bar hates two letter words and thinks 'no-ox' is two two-letter words.)

    Here's a question for you all:

    If you accidentally put on a little too much of it... is there any risk of it forming a conductive path between the switch frog and the adjacent rails? ME Code 55 turnouts, if it matters -- they have air gaps cut in next to the frog, all 4 rails, but the gaps are verrry thin, too-narrow-to-run-your-fingernail-through-the-gap thin, one or two pieces of paper thin.

    It seems like if you had a glob of goo even a millimeter across on your finger, you would fill that gap, and have a bear of a time clearing it out.

    I didn't see that particular hazard mentioned in the big no-ox thread.. but wanted to ask how scared I should be of it / how I should plan to recover from it, before I started spreading goo on the track.

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    A gob? Might be applying too much. When I did it I barely wet (greased?) my finger. Slid my finger until there was no grease - you can feel the rubbing resistance - then moved or twisted said finger to apply more. In the end there was only a small dip in the surface of the stuff in the container, that's how little I used. Worked great. Probably have enough left for a couple dozen more applications.

    Only issue I had was loss of traction, by maybe 5%.
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    Quote Originally Posted by NtheBasement View Post
    A gob? Might be applying too much. When I did it I barely wet (greased?) my finger.
    Geeze, give the OP some credit. He's not asking how to apply it and he's not applying with a spatula, he said "If you accidentally put on a little too much of it... "

    I don't think the No-Ox is conductive, it just keeps the surface free of oxidation.
    If anything it'll act like a layer of insulation?

    If you get too much in there, I would think a hobby knife or razor blade wrapped with a tissue should get the worst of the excess out.
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    To make the liquid to bridge a gap and to make a short or grounding, smaller or bigger, it's hard. Do not be afraid, nothing will happen. I paint one steam loco wheels and conecting rod with Neolube 2. I paint also the axle end on both adiacent wheel. Perfect grounding as you think. When o put on track, the cab fill the short and triped. I just go with loco on DC track, i put the power over 60% and thin layer of graphite make just small spark where was bridged and loco start to move. I did not try to scrub or clean the graphite. I use also ACC 6000 conductalube on my track, not any short on turnout or crossings. It will be okay.
    I LIKE TO WORK WITH BIG SHIP ENGINES BUT I SPEND MY FREE TIME AROUND N SCALE TRAIN MODELS.

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    Quote Originally Posted by Siegmund View Post
    If you accidentally put on a little too much of it... is there any risk of it forming a conductive path between the switch frog and the adjacent rails?
    No. The reason it won't is because of what it is. Paragraph six of the superb Track Cleaninbg NoOx thread states:

    "An explanation of what No-Ox is, and what it does, is needed at this point. No-Ox (plastic safe) is a rust preventive with a corrosion inhibitor system that prevents the formation of oxides. It penetrates and chemically treats metals to convert the insulative, naturally occurring, oxide coatings to a surface that is a conductor."

    It won't conduct. It is used to modify the surface of the rails to avoid oxidation and its inherent insulation between the rails and the locomotive wheels.

    Just use a toothpick to get out any over-application. There are a handful of different sizes of toothpicks, too, as well as wood and plastic ones.

    All the best, you'll love the results, I did mine over a year ago and things are still great over the entire layout.

    It's easier to find that NoOx link by searching on "Track cleaning" - https://www.nscale.net/forums/conten...cott-and-No-Ox
    Monopoly & Octopus (modified & expanded) (starts on page 1, Post #29)
    https://www.nscale.net/forums/showthread.php?15459-Monopoly-and-Octopus-RR-Layout/


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    Thanks to all for replies.
    I figured there must be some reason it wasn't likely to be a problem if I hadn't read about it already.

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    Quote Originally Posted by Allen H. View Post
    If anything it'll act like a layer of insulation?
    If that were the case, then locomotives wouldn't run after it was applied to the rails.

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    Insulation?
    Quote Originally Posted by donzi View Post
    If that were the case, then locomotives wouldn't run after it was applied to the rails.
    donzi, please see my quote and link to the Track Cleaning, Linn Wescott & No-Ox thread. The idea that locomotives wouldn't run on it is not how it works and why it needs to be left on the rails for 24-48 hours and then wiped off before operation. It is a chemical reaction on the rails to avoid the oxidation and it is the oxidation that creates the insulation which is why trains don't run well.
    Monopoly & Octopus (modified & expanded) (starts on page 1, Post #29)
    https://www.nscale.net/forums/showthread.php?15459-Monopoly-and-Octopus-RR-Layout/


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    Quote Originally Posted by Stu View Post
    Insulation?


    donzi, please see my quote and link to the Track Cleaning, Linn Wescott & No-Ox thread. The idea that locomotives wouldn't run on it is not how it works and why it needs to be left on the rails for 24-48 hours and then wiped off before operation. It is a chemical reaction on the rails to avoid the oxidation and it is the oxidation that creates the insulation which is why trains don't run well.
    Yep, well aware of how it works. Even if not completely wiped off, the loco’s will still “run”, but will be unable to gain traction and will have excessive wheel slip. No-ox is not an insulator, but rather forms a barrier to keep oxygen from the surface of what it’s applied to, thus oxidation/corrosion will not form.
    The OP ponders if an excessive amount might form a bridge between two conductive surfaces, (I read that to ask if there is risk of shorting) there is no risk of that happening.
    We are on the same page.

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    Quote Originally Posted by Allen H. View Post
    If anything it'll act like a layer of insulation?


    Quote Originally Posted by donzi View Post
    If that were the case, then locomotives wouldn't run after it was applied to the rails.
    What I was referring to was that if it was built up between the stock rail and point rail that much, when the point is thrown towards that stock rail, it wouldn't physically allow the rails to actually touch therefore acting like insulation.

    Here I thought that everyone knew that you didn't leave No-Ox on the track but you actually remove it?
    You may actually want to go back and reread the thread.


    https://www.nscale.net/forums/conten...cott-and-No-Ox
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    You seem to have a problem with reading and comprehension.
    Go back and slowly read the OP question again.
    Quote Originally Posted by Siegmund View Post
    is there any risk of it forming a conductive path between the switch frog and the adjacent rails? M
    He states nothing about stock rails and point rails. If you will re-read it slowly, he asks about the frogs and adjacent rails.

    Try ,to the best of your ability, (Well, maybe you did, understanding your comprehension level) to respond to what a poster asks, and you could benifit to educate yourself before responding.
    Surely you could google for a basic course on reading and compression on the internet.
    If not, there are local community colleges who would be happy to help you.
    Best of luck with that.

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    Quote Originally Posted by donzi View Post
    You seem to have a problem with reading and comprehension.
    Go back and slowly read the OP question again.

    He states nothing about stock rails and point rails. If you will re-read it slowly, he asks about the frogs and adjacent rails.

    Try ,to the best of your ability, (Well, maybe you did, understanding your comprehension level) to respond to what a poster asks, and you could benifit to educate yourself before responding.
    Surely you could google for a basic course on reading and compression on the internet.
    If not, there are local community colleges who would be happy to help you.
    Best of luck with that.
    Moose sorry, but this has Moose rolling on floor... No offense intended towards Allen. Hopefully, people here can tune it down a bit. Everyone is here to enjoy the hobby, engage in some commradery, and hopefully learn from each other. Please assume that people have their best intentions when posting responses. And before you post, consider if what you post is three things: 1. Truthful, 2. Nice, and 3. Necessary. If not, consider not posting, so the rest of the fine folks here on nSn can enjoy this forum....

    P.S. After posting this, Moose has to wonder if some of what Moose just wrote might have violated the three rules that Moose just suggested...
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    Quote Originally Posted by Moose2013 View Post
    And before you post, consider if what you post is three things: 1. Truthful, 2. Nice, and 3. Necessary. If not, consider not posting, so the rest of the fine folks here on nSn can enjoy this forum....
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